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Full text of "Essex Institute historical collections"

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449195 



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GENEALOGY 



LECTiON 



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I ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01103 0530 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/essexinstitutehiv24esse 



ESSEX INSTITUTE 



HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS 



VOLUMOXIV 




974 ¥0/ 

SALEM, MASS. 

PRINTED FOR THE ESSEX INSTITUTE 

1888 



PRINTED AT 

THE SALEM PRESS, 

8ALEM, MASS. 



1449195 



CONTENTS 



PARTS I, II, III. 

A Contribution to the History of the Ancient Family of Wood- 
bury, communicated by Kobert S. Rantoul, ... 1 

Early Settlers of Rowley (continued), 43 

Half-mile Stone, Wenham, 71 

Inscriptions from the Old Burying Ground, Wenham (contin- 
ued), 72 



Parts iv, v, vi. 

Negro Slavery in Massachusetts ; portions of a paper read be- 
fore the Beverly Lyceum, April, 1833, by Robert Rantoul, 
Senr., • « 81 

Inscriptions from the Old Burying Ground in Dodge's Row 

(North Beverly), copied by Wellington Pool, . . 109 

Sketch of Mrs. William Jarvis of Weathersfield, Vt., by Mrs. 
Mary Pepperell Sparhawk Jarvis Cutts, edited by Cecil 
Hampden Cutts Howard, 123 

An "Epicedium," composed in 1752 by Rev. John Cleaveland of 
Chebacco (now Essex), in Ipswich, Mass., by E. P. Crow- 
ell, 140 

Inscriptions from the Old Burying Ground at Lynnfleld Centre, 

copied by John T. Moulton, . . . . . .146 

(iii) 



IV CONTENTS. 

Pay Roll of Cap* Jn<> Dodge's Company of Guards, found among 

the papers of Enos Gallop, 1834, 157 

Salem Military Company — Names of the Volunteer Artillery 

Corps, . . . . . ' . . . • . .160 



PARTS VII, VIII, IX. 

Gleanings relative to the family of Adam Hawkes, one of the 
early settlers of the third plantation of Massachusetts, con- 
tributed by Nathan M. Hawkes, 161 

Early Records of the Church in Topsfleld, communicated by 

John H. Gould, 181 

Sketch of Mrs. William Jarvis (continued), .... 206 

Genealogy of the Allen Family of Manchester, Mass., from the 

earliest settlement to the year 1886, by John Price, . 223 



Parts x, xi, xii. 

Our New Domain, 241 

A History of Methodism in Salem, by James F. Almy, . . 275 

Allen Family (continued), 302 

Notes and Queries, 313 



HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS 

OP THE 

ESSEX INSTITUTE. 

Vol. XXIV. Jan., Feb., March, 1887. Xos. 1, 2, 3, 

A CONTRIBUTION TO THE HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT 
FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 



COMMUNICATED BY ROBERT S. RANTOUL. 



No less than nineteen towns and one or more counties, 
located in fourteen different states of the Union, bear the 
name of Woodbury. It is a name which fills no inconsid- 
erable space in the library catalogues and in the dictionaries 
of authors. It is the name of an ancient, numerous, wide- 
spread and substantial family. Risdon, writing before 
1640, cites the Woodburvs as having been among: the 
conspicuous families of southern Devon, and Polwhele, 
writing later and evidently following the same authorities, 
says of the Damarells of Stoke Damarell, near Plymouth, 
" This family was connected with many distinguished 
houses, such as Woodbery," and others. 1 Possibly it may 
be able to claim amongst its sons so interesting: a charac- 
ter as that old knight, Sir Ralph de Wodeburg of Not- 



1 See Tristram Risrlon's Survey of Devon, p. 207; also Richard Polvvhele's His- 
tory of Devonshire, Vol. Ill, p. 450. 

(1) 



2 NOTES ON THE 

tingham, whom the chronicle exhibits buckling on his 
armor for the Welsh wars which gave Eel ward the Plan- 
tagenet, first of the sovereigns of England, undisputed 
dominion over that Celtic province, and his infant son, 
first of the long line of heirs of England, the title of 
Prince of Wales. 2 

Later it produced such a man as John Woodbury, the 
pioneer of Cape Ann ; four years in New England before 
the arrival of Endecott ; first envoy to the mother country ; 
first constable of Salem ; the "father Woodbery" of our 
early records, to whom one of the five farms of two hun- 



2 From 1267 to 1284, Llewellyn ap Gryftith, the acknowledged Welsh chief, was 
constantly invading England and inflicting incalculable losses upon the southern 
counties. This chief died in battle, and the unruly principality at last succumbed 
in 1284. The spirit of the times is well embodied in these burning words which the 
poet Gray puts into the mouth of his Welsh bard : 

" Ruin seize thee, ruthless King I 

Confusion on thy banners wait; 

Though fanned by Conquest's crimson wing 

They mock the air with idle state 

Helm nor hauberk's twisted mail, 

Nor e'en thy virtues, Tyrant 1 shall avail 

To save thy secret soul from nightly fears, 

From Cambria's curse — from Cambria's tears! 



Weave the warp and weave the woof, 
The winding-sheet of Edward's race I 
Give ample room and verge enough 
The characters of Hell to trace !" 



In July, 1277, the writs for military service, for the fifth year of Edward I, show 
Radulphus deWodeburg', knight, performing duty under a summons from the con- 
stable of England, returnable at a muster at Worcester on the octave of St. John 
the Baptist; and again, in a record of " Wages of Knights and Esquires in the 
Welsh Wars" for 1282-4, the tenth and twelfth years of Edward I, Sir Ralph appears 
in the following entry : "Friday, 19th June, for Sir Ralph de Wodeburg, with lour 
horses and trappings from Monday, 15th June, to the vigil of St. John the Baptist, 
9 days, XLV shillings wages." And in the "Fine Rolls" of the thirteenth year of 
Edward I (1285) Henry de Woddebur (described in "Testa de Nevill" as " films et 
heres Rad'i") appears as executor of the will of Rad.' de Wodebur. But Robert 
Thoroton in his Antiquities of Nottingham (1(>77) cites the "Pipe Roll" for the sixth 
year of Richard I, and names one Ralph de Wudebure who in that year (1195) gave 
account of twenty marks lor having the king's good will. 



ANCIENT FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 



3 



dred acres each, "by the great pond side," was voted by the 
colony in 1635. 3 

In our own day it can claim men of such eminence as 
the Honorable Peter Chardon Brooks of Boston, with his 
distinguished descendants bearing the names of Adams, 
Frothingham and Everett, as well as the Reverend Phil- 
lips Brooks, a grandson of his brother. 4 And it may 

3 The Honorable Charles Levi Woodbury, formerly United States attorney for 
the district of Massachusetts, has lately printed an admirable monograph upon the 
"Old Planter," to which and to its distinguished author I am largely indebted. The 
honorable position in which John Woodbury's name occurs in the Town Records 
of Salem, notably in the contract with John Pickering in 1638 for the enlargement 
of the "meetinge howse" where he signs next after Endecott and is followed by 
Hathorne, Leech and Conant, gives some hint at the estimation in which his neigh- 
bors held him. See Hist. Coll. Essex Institute, Vol. IX, pp. 81-2. 








1CH&— 



Fragments of Woodbury genealogy, tracing branches of the family since John 
Woodbury's arrival in Massachusetts in 1624, may be found in ''The Old Planter in 
New England," above cited, and in Benedict's History of Sutton, Mass., Cochrane's 
History of Antrim, N. H., Cogswell's History of New Boston, N. H., Woodhury's 
History of Bedford, N. H., Merrill's History of Acworth, N. IL, Stark's History of 
Lunbarton, N. H., Savage's Genealogical Dictionary. Vol. IV, Fiske's Genealogy 
of the Fiskes of Amherst, D wight's Dwight Genealogy, Babson's History of 
Gloucester, Mass., Stone's History of Beverly, Mass., N. E. Hist, and Gen. Reg., 
Vol. VII, pp. 187,322, and Hist. Coll. Essex Institute, Vol. I, et seq. 

* For a sketch of Peter C Brooks, reprinted from the N. E. Hist. Geneal. Reg- 
ister, Vols. VIII and IX, contributed by Edward Everett to "Hunt's Lives of 
American Merchants," see Vol. I of that work, pp. 133-183; and for genealogical 
matter, see Brooks' History of Medford, Bond's History of Watertown, Vol. II, 
pp. 726-7, and Proceedings Mass. Historical Society, Vol. XVII, pp. 98-100. Mr. 
Brooks' maternal grandfather, the Reverend John Brown of Haverhill (H. C, 
1714) was a great-grandson of John Woodbury, the "Old Planter," through his son 
Peter, known as " Sargent" and " Deacon" Peter. 



4 NOTES ON THE 

claim another distinguished son in the gallant young sol- 
dier, Lieutenant Colonel Hodges of Salem, who was 
killed at Petersburg, Virginia, July 30, 1864, and who, 
having been commissioned as major November 7, 1862, is 
thought to have been the youngest officer who left Massa- 
chusetts with that rank during the War of the Rebellion. 5 

But the most conspicuous of all those who have borne 
the name was also a man of our own time, the Honorable 
Levi Woodbury of New Hampshire, Governor and twice 
Senator of his state ; Secretary of the Navy and of the Treas- 
ury under Jackson ; and the successor of Judge Story as 
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United 
States. 6 

I shall be able further to establish the interesting fact 



6 Lt. Col. John Hodges, of the 59th Massachusetts Regiment of Infantry, was 
born at Salem, Dec. 8, 1841, and left Harvard College, at the outbreak of the war, 
to serve the country. His maternal grandmother was Mehetable, a daughter of 
John and Hannah (Woodbury) Batchelder, who was a daughter of the fourth 
Peter Woodbury, and therefore a great-great-granddaughter of the first Peter 
known as "Sargent" Peter and " Deacon" Peter. Lieut. Col. Hodges was com- 
missioned Major of the 50th Massachusetts Regiment at the age of twenty years 
and eleven months, and in that capacity commanded a brigade at Port Hudson. 
See Harvard Memorial Biographies, Vol. II, pp. 285-293, and Report of Adjutant 
General of Massachusetts for 18G2, p. 456. 

6 Judge Woodbury, at the time of his death in Sept., 1851, was the probable 
candidate for the Democratic nomination for the presidency, which, falling the 
next year to General Franklin Pierce of New Hampshire, resulted in the election 
of the latter. Judge Woodbury's father, who was a man of mark in New Hamp- 
shire, was born at the old homestead in North Beverly " by the great pond side," 
a picture of which will be found in the monograph on the "Old Planter," p. 81. 
He removed with his parents, when a child, to the neighborhood of Amherst. N. H. 
He was a great grandson of John Woodbury the " old planter" through his son 
Peter. See " Writings of Levi Woodbury, Political, Judicial and Literary," three 
vols., 1852; also Woodbury and Minot's Reports for First Circuit, 1847-1852, 3 Vols.; 
"An Eulogy pronounced at his funeral at Portsmouth, N. II.," Sept., 1851, by 
Robert Rantoul, jr.; also Loring's "Hundred Boston Orators," pp. (J60-U4; "In- 
ternational Magazine," Vol. IV, and "National Portrait Gallery," Vol. 11. The 
admirable likeness of Judge Woodbury which precedes this paper is from a dimin- 
ished copy in marble of the bust by Hiram Powers. The head itself, which is 
in my possession, was turned on a lathe from the life-sized original, by the Blanch- 
ard process for turning irregular forms, described in Harper's Magazine for 1881, 
Vol. LXIII, p. 257. I had hoped to produce this sun-picture by the much-admired 
process known as Woodbury type, but Gliding it ill-adapted to the purpose, I have 
availed myself of another method employed by the Ileliolype Printing Company 
of Boston. 



ANCIENT FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 5 

that for eight completed centuries, and probably for a very 
considerable fraction of the thousand years which preceded 
them, the name of Woodbury has maintained an unbroken 
hold upon a portion of the soil of Devon. 

Let me dismiss at once, as briefly as may be, the matter 
of spelling. I shall use the letters Woodbury, except 
in cases where it seems better to reproduce some quaint, 
archaic orthography, because most of the persons now 
living, who bear the name, use that combination of letters ; 
because the maps, hand-books and railway guides of the 
day so designate the localities I am to speak of; and be- 
cause, upon the whole, it represents, as well as any, the 
sound of the name and the varied modes of spelling which 
the records exhibit. There is no conceivable way of ex- 
pressing the sound in written characters which has not 
been practised in those illiterate ages when the pen was 
not vaunting itself mightier than the sword, when there 
were no dictionaries and no newspapers, nor any other 
common standard of spelling, when reading and writing 
were costly accomplishments to all but the priesthood, and 
when even royal personages did 'well if they could affix 
a legible signature, by way of sign-manual, to a decree or 
charter. The Honorable Charles Levi Woodbury tells me 
he has the name in more than forty variations. His im- 
pression is that the "Old Planter," on the whole, preferred 
W t oodbury. 7 

If the name may legitimately begin with either the let- 

7 See "An Old Planter in New England" pp. 95-98, where the m<itteris discussed 
with a good deal of curious learning. Also, Benjamin Thorpe's '« Diplomatarium 
Anylicum JEvi Saxonici'" pp. 608-10. Also note to very learned preface of •'Bos- 
worth's Anglo Saxon Dictionary," p. xviii. Also "Reflections on Names and 
Places in Devonshire, London, 1845;" Isaac Taylor's "Words and Places;" Devon- 
shire Domesday," pp. 44-46. 

The Criminal Legislation of a later time put a premium upon this accomplish- 
ment of reading and writing which is known in modern phrase as "benefit of 
clergy." At Exeter, in the fortieth year of Elizabeth (1598), seven culprits were 
"branded and set free, being able to read," who would otherwise have been hanged 
for thefts as eight others, who could not read, were treated in the same year for the 
same offences. 



6 NOTES ON THE 

ters Wnde, Wud, Wode, Wod, Wodde, Wbode, or Wood, 
and end with either the letters bury, biry, bvy, birig, bere, 
beare, beer, bery, berie, burie, bur, burg, or the like, and 
we find all these forms, the philologist will see at a glance 
what a generous choice of interpretation as well as of 
spelling is open to him. 

The Domesday spelling (A. D. 1085-86), viz., Wode- 
berie, Latinized Udeberga and Udeberia, and the three spell- 
ings found in a Saxon Chronicle (A.D. 1072-1103) viz., 
Wudeburg, Wudeburge and Wudebirig are the earliest forms 
known to me. The syllable Wode or Wude would seem to 
be referable to a Saxon origin, and to associate itself readily 
with the family of words meaning mad, furious, frantic, to 
which belongs "Odin" or "Woden" the Norseman's wrath- 
god or Gothic Mars. 8 And the terminal syllable bwc, 
birg, or bury, the letters y and g being always freely inter- 
changeable in these dialects, would seem to mean a strong- 
hold, castle, fort or earthwork on a hill, easily allying 
itself with the German Jbtrg or trurfj and furnishing one of 
the most common endings for the name of a large town to 
be found in England. The broad license practised in the 
spelling of this terminal syllable is well illustrated by Sir 
William Dugdale in his "Antiquities of Warwickshire" 
where he speaks of " Rugby" as called " Rocheberie " in 
Domesday, and interprets this ancient form of "Roxbury" 
as meaning "Roche, rock ; Berie, a court or habitation of 



8 The word Woodhas retained this meaning as late as Shakespeare's time. Thus 
in "Two Gentlemen of Verona," Act II, Scene 3, "O I that the shoe could speak now 
like a wood woman." And in "A Midsummer Night's Dream," Act. II, Scene 1, 

"Thou told'st me they were stolen into this wood, 

And here am I, and wood within this wood, 

Because I cannot meet my Hermia." 
And in Henry VI, Part One, Act. IV, Scene 7 : 

"How the young whelp of Talbot's, raging wood, 

Did flesh his puny sword in Frenchmen's blood!" 
The Saxon root survives in Wednesbury, a famous battlefield in Warwickshire, 
and in Wednesday, the Anglo-Saxon Wodnesdmg; also in Wodensburge and Wo- 
densdike iu Wiltshire. See Camden (A.D. 158(3), 3d edition, pp. 101-127. 



ANCIENT FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 7 

note." No chance collection of letters could have found 
its way into such general favor as this termination bury 
enjoys. Amongst the larger towns of England I find no 
less than fifty-eight whose names end in bury, and most of 
these in the southern counties ; and if the list were ex- 
tended so as to include the obvious modifications of bury 
already alluded to, the number might be doubled. If we 
are to look for the origin of this terminal syllable among 
the Danes or Norsemen rather than among the Saxons, 
such works as "Reflections on Names and Places in Devon- 
shire" and Taylor's "Words and Places" are of great assists 
ance. The last named author cites, as Norse names found 
near Plymouth, Langabeer, Beardon, Beer Alston, as well 
as Bury and Beara, both near water-ways, and all these he 
associates with byr, the Danish word for water. But what 
is more to our purpose is this : Taylor finds that fortified 
camps, whether of British, Roman, Saxon or Danish con- 
struction, are very commonly marked with this suffix bury. 
In Wiltshire alone he finds military earthworks to the num- 
ber of twenty-five, now or lately in existence at places 
whose names end in bury, as well as one at Bury Wood, 
and the sites of six others of British or Saxon origin are 
named, which have been utilized in the erection of Nor- 
man castles. 9 

I find in England at the present time several localities 
bearing the name of Woodbury. In the centre of Dorset- 
shire, near Bere Regis, is an ancient circular camp of about 
ten acres, "tripple trencht, with ditches and ramparts deep 
and high," on a hill "whereon is kept a considerable fair 
and market \_feria mercatoria] established in the time of 
King John" (1199-1216). The "Wodeburyhyll fair" is 
mentioned in the valuation of the manor and hundred of 

»See 'Words and Places," Chap. VIII, p. 104, also Chap. X, p. 178. 



8 NOTES ON THE 

Bere in the Valor Ecclesiasticus of Henry VIII (1509- 
1547) and survives to-day. In 1332 Wodbury was named 
among the estates on which the Prioress and Convent of 
Esebourne held a claim in Dorset. Close by was Dor- 
chester, the seat of the Dorchester Company, where the 
Reverend John White lived and ministered, whence John 
Woodbury departed for America, and where Endecofct, who 
sailed from its harbor in 1628, is thought to have been 
born. 

In Somersetshire also, a county likewise bounding Devon 
on the east, and north of Dorset, we have an estate bear- 
ing the name of "Wodebergh Hamlet," inventoried in In- 
quisitiones post mortem, for the year 1304 and again in 
1418, spelled Wodeberwe, in 1437, spelled Wodeberewe, 
and in 1443. It figures also in a suit at law in 1318. 
This may or may not be identical with the tumulus de- 
scribed at the head-waters of the Exe, from which Roman 
coins have been unearthed, and now called Wooclborough, 
supposed to be identical with the Udeberga of the Exon 
Domesday. John Woodbury, the "Old Planter," came from 
Somersetshire. 

In Wiltshire again another tumulus of the same charac- 
ter is called Woodborow, and the lexicographers tell us 
that the termination berry (Anglo-Saxon beorli) is cor- 
rupted from barrow or burrow, a heap or hillock. This 
Wiltshire estate had manorial rights. The Maneria et Ec- 
clesia de Wodeberg are mentioned in Hotuli Finium in 
1258, and again in Inquisitiones post mortem in 1278, and 
ten times thereafter ending with the year 1430, under the 
new forms of "Wodberwe," "Wodebirghe," "Wodebore," 
"Wodeborgh" and "Wodeberwey." Conveyances appear in 
1330, 1346 and 1364 in the Exchequer Originalia. We 
seethe last of it in Queen Elizabeth's time (1558-1603), 
when the estate of "Woodburgh" or "Woodborough" dis- 






ANCIENT FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 9 

appears in the Court of Chancery. But as early as 1227, 
Johannes deWudeberg', of Wiltes, the earliest John Wood- 
bury, by the way, who has yet been discovered, was acquit- 
ted, by a jury of the vicinage, of the accidental killing of 
his eldest son, while castigating an unruly ox in plough- 
ing. 10 The Dammorys had estates called "Wodepyry," 
" Woclepury" and " Wodpiry " in Wiltes and Oxfordshire, 
and the Wiltshire Gazetteers still give us a parish of Wood- 
borough. 

Of the Nottinghamshire estate we know little except 
that it seems to have been held of the honor of Peverell. 
In Rotulus Oancellarii for Nottingham, one GalPdeWude- 
burc sustains an adverse judgment for the sum of two 
and one-half marks in 1202. On March 15, 1205, one 
Rad' de Wudeburc', probably the grandfather of our old 
friend Sir Ralph, whom we left with his foot in the styrrup, 
starting: out to fight the Welshmen, was licensed to sell 
eight acres of his woodland in Wudeburc', so it might be 
sett off without injury to the Royal Demesne, as appears 
from Rotuli Patentium de Terris Novmannis datis and 
Rotidi Litterarum Clausarum, for the sixth year of King 
John. In 1275, Radulphus de Wodeburg' appears as as- 
sessor of the counties of Nottingham and Derby, and at 
the end of the century Testa de Nevill names Henr* de 
Wodeburgh,^' <& heres Rad'i de Wodeburgh, as holding 
half a Knight's fee in that name in Nottingham. The manor 
of Woodborough in Nottingham was in the Court of Chan- 
cery in the time of Elizabeth (1558-1603) and there is a 
' parish of Woodborough to-day which Robert Thoroton, in 
1677, took to be identical with the Udeburgh of ihe Exon 
Domesday. 



10 An interesting account of the proceedings in the case may be read in medie- 
val Latin in" Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum in Turri Londinensi Asservath" Anno IT 
Henr. III. 

HIST. COLL. XXIV 1* 



10 NOTES ON THE 

Of the Woodbury estate in Hampshire still less has come 
to light. In 1297, "Wodeburgh Villa" appears in Inqui- 
sitiones post mortem for that county, and William de Alba 
Marlia or Daumerle had died seized in capiie of lands 
thereabouts in 1289, which reappear in the records in 1336. 
This is the family of Damarell, which Polwhele says inter- 
married with the Woodbury s of Devon. Their ancestor, 
says Lysons, held seventeen manors at the time of the 
Domesday survey. In 1321, a successor to Sir William's 
name and title, probably his son, was taken in arms against 
Edward II, having espoused the fortunes of the Earl of 
Lancaster and the barons then in rebellion, and was granted 
his life and enlarged from duress and pardoned, on pay- 
ment of forty shillings and the giving of a bond for good 
behaviour and an oath to perform military service to the 
king when required. He was summoned January 7, 1325, 
under the condition of this pardon, to perform military 
duty in Guyenne, beyond seas, under the command of the 
Earl of Warrenne, and to report at a muster at Ports- 
mouth, on Sunday next after Midlent, March 24, 1325. 11 
Some William de Albemarle was summoned by the sheriff 
of Devon, the year before, under the name and style of 
"Willielmus Daumarl de Wodeburi, Man-at-Arms," to at- 
tend the Great Council at Westminster on Wednesday 
next after Ascension. 

A pretty good account can be given of "Woodbury Hall" 
or "Court" in the west of Cambridgeshire, from the time 
of Edward I (1272-1307). From that time on, this manor 
was, says Camden who wrote in 1586, the seat of the Bab- 
ington family who held it for many generations. In 1476, 
it was inventoried, together with Gamelyngey, in the name 
of Mar gar eta Taylard, Vidua. From these it passed to 



u The "War Summons." painted by George Leslie, It. A., of London, now in the 
possession of the Essex Institute, has an interest in this connection. 



ANCIENT FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 11 

Delves and Sheffields, being named in the records of the 
Chancery Courts of Elizabeth's time as "Lands in Woodburie 
and the manor of Woodburie," and again as the "Manor 
of Woodbery and a messuage and 150 acres of land near 
to the same," the estate having been sold during that reign 
by Edmund Lord Sheffield, the same influential statesman 
and member of the Plymouth Company who, in 1623, is- 
sued and signed the original patent for the settlement at 
Cape Anne now hanging on the walls of the Essex Insti- 
tute. [See Thornton's "Landing at Cape Anne."] In the 
reign of Charles I (1625-1649) the estate passed to Sir 
John Jacob and so by purchase and through female heirs 
to the Earl of Macclesfield who held it at the close of the 
last century. It now (1886) belongs to Sir Williamson 
Booth, Baronet. Close by it is Gamlingay, the elegant 
seat of Sir George Downing, Baronet, founder of Down- 
ing College, Cambridge. 12 That Willielmus de Wodeburg, 
knight, who is accredited with performing military duty 
in July, 1277, in the writs and returns of military sum- 
mons for the fifth year of Edward I, seems to have been 
a Cambridgeshire Woodbury. 

In Worcestershire again we have another Woodbury 
Hill, with its camp known as "Owen Glendower's Camp," 
but, says Camden, probably older. Gough's edition of 
Camden gives a plan of this camp. It is single-trenched 
and encloses an area of about twenty-seven acres. It is 
nine miles northwest from the city of Worcester. Here 
Glendower with his force of Welsh and French skirmished 



12 He died at Gamlingay, in 1749. He was a grandson of that Sir George of un- 
savory memory, who was the first Salem graduate of Harvard College, a member 
of the first class ever graduated there, and the son of Emanuel Downing who 
lived on the site of Plummer Hall and married the sister of Governor Winthrop. 
From Sir George, last-named, Secretary to the Treasury in 1(507, Downing street, 
Whitehall, London, took its name. See Lysons' "Magna Britannia," Vol. II, pp. 
200-201, Gough's Camden, Vol. V, p. 527, Sibley's Harvard Graduates, Vol. 1, pp. 
28-51. 



12 NOTES ON THE 

with Henry IV for eight days in 1405, with a loss of two 
hundred men. 

We now come to the County of Devon, which I sup- 
pose to be the original habitat of the Woodbury family, 
because I find the name existing here at an earlier date 
than elsewhere, and more extensively identified with the 
soil. Two several Woodbury localities exist in Devon. 
The chief of these, of which I shall speak first, includes a 
parish, a manor, and a fortified hill or castle. It is the 
earliest spot known to me with which the name has been 
associated. It has borne the name of Woodbury, and no 
other, since the Norman Conquest. It has every appear- 
ance of having borne it much longer. If Westcote and 
other high authorities are right in supposing that family 
names, where they are identical with names of places, 
have been derived from those of places, 13 then it is fair to 
presume that the family name Woodbury, whatever it may 
mean, is derived from this locality by the side of the river 
Exe. Accordingly, I shall devote some space to as accu- 
rate an account as I can give of this interesting region. 

With a single exception the earliest mention of it with- 
in my reach occurs in a Saxon Chronicle the date of which 
is fixed by the allusion it contains to the Bishop Osbern. 
This "Osbern" or " Osbert," who was probably a brother 
of the fighting Earl of that name, though church grandees 
bore arms in those days, was a partisan of the Conqueror 
and was consecrated as Bishop in 1072 and died in office 
in 1103. The passage in the Saxon Chronicle, which, it 
is to be regretted, cannot be reproduced in all its quaint 
originality of phrase and written character, begins thus : 



I3 For a discussion of this subject see Lysons' "Magna Britannia," Vol. VI, pref- 
atory " general history of Devonshire, " p. Ixxxii, a, and a note from Thomas 
Westcote, who wrote in KIJO. The learned author of the Magna Britannia haz- 
ards the opinion that not one estate in the County of Devon remains at the time of 
his writing (1822) in the possession of a descendant of any person who held it at 
the time of the Domesday Survey. 









ANCIENT FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 13 

" On Criste's naman, & Ses Petrus apostolus, an gild- 
scipe is gegaderod on Wudeburge lande" u 

Paraphrasing the original in the language of to-day, the 
Saxon record continues — " And the Bishop Osbern and the 
Canons within St. Peter's monastery at Exeter have 
adopted the same society in fellowship along with the other 
brethren \_gegyldan~] . They will now, as an acknowledg- 
ment, pay to the Canons yearly, for every hearth, one 
penny at easter ; and also for every departed gild-brother, 
for every hearth, one penny as soul-scot, 15 be it a man, be it 
a woman who belongs to the gildship, and the Canons are 
to have the soul-scot and to perform such service for them 
as they ought to perform. And here follow the names of 
those who are in the gildship." 16 

While I am obliged to treat this as the earliest estab- 
lished date, save one, at which an allusion to Woodbury 
can be quoted, I am led to suppose, partly from the tone 



u These guilds or gildships " gathered in the name of Christ and Saint Peter " 
were associations for mutual protection and relief formed under Saxon laws pro- 
mulgated as early as the time of the great King INE, of glorious memory, who 
reigned in Wessex from A. D. 688, " for thirty-seven winters." But Thorpe thinks 
that guilds, which became so common among the Saxons, were of Roman origin, 
and very ancient. For an exhaustive treatment of the wliole matter, consult Benj. 
Thorpe's " Liplomatarium Avglicum JEvi Sacconici", pp. 6('8, 10; Rev. Geo. Hickes' 
( Dean of Worcester) " Dissert. EpUt.," pp. 18-25; Sharon Turner's v ' History of the 
Anglo-Saxons," Book II, Chap. X; Dr. Lappenberg's " History of England under 
the Anglo-Saxon Kings," translated by Thorpe, Vol. I, p. 36, Vol II, p. 333; Kern- 
ble's " Saxons in England,-" Vol. I, p. 249, and Edward A. Freeman's "Old English 
History." See, also, " Freeman's Norman Conquest," Vol. IV, p. 254. 

15 Mass-money. This word " scot," (sometimes •' shot ") survives in the famil- 
iar phrase '• scot free." " Scot and lot " is rather obsolete now, but it was good 
enough English for Sir Jack Falstaff. — See Shakespeare's Henry IV, 1st Part, Act 
V, Scene 4. '"Snloodl 'twas time to counterfeit or that hot termagant Scot had 
paid me scot and lot too." Also, Act V, Scene 3, " 'Though I could 'scape shot- 
free at London, I fear the shot here: here's no scoring but upon the pate." 

16 Some of the names which follow are Leofric,Ealdwine, Alfric, Eadmar, Osgod 
Godric, Godwine. The record proceeds " In Wudeburgland there is also another 
gildship gathered to Christ and St. Peter, and they pay at Martinmas from every 
hearth one penny to St. Peter's monastery for the Canons, and also every soul- 
shot, for every hearth, one penny. And these are the names of the men :" Alwyne, 
Theodiic, Bytel, Edwine, etc. 



14 NOTES ON THE 

in which so eminent a local antiquary as Shortthas written, 
that the period at which the name of Woodbury attached 
itself to this region midway between Exeter and Exmonth, 
was of a high antiquity. Lysons begins his notice of the 
"Manor of Woodbury" by saying that it "was part of the 
royal demesne and had been settled on Editha, consort of 
Edward the Confessor," who reigned from 1042 until the 
conquest, but he cites no authorities and gives no dates. 17 
And the Exeter Domesday states that Gytha held it at the 
decease of the Confessor, A. D., 1066. At some time 
before these dates — how long before I must leave the 
reader to conjecture — either in the Saxon, the Roman, or 
possibly in the earlier British period, the place had ac- 
quired a name whose modern equivalent is that of the 
Woodbury family. 

In quoting at some length from the learned works of 
W. T. Peter Shortt, A. M., entitled "Sylva Antiqua Is- 
cana" and " Collectanea Curiosa Antiqua Dunmonia" I 
shall at once exhibit what is known of the Roman or earlier 
British origin of the castle at Woodbury and possibly throw 
some new light on the derivation of the name. He says, — 
"This very interesting work, completely unique in form, 
and altered and enlarged as occasion required, was proba- 
bly an outpost of some note in the latter days of the Roman 
Empire, against the Saxon pirates." Here the learned 
author introduces and discusses a full-page lithographic plan 
of the work and adds : "It is the opinion of an intelligent 
friend who visited the camp lately that these out-works 
may have been added in much later times ; that the small, 
original, oval camp was greatly enlarged on the southeast 
and strengthened on the northwest and that as a whole, 
after the introduction of firearms (probably when the first 

17 See Lysons' Mayna Britannia, Vol. VI, pp. 571-2. 



ANCIENT FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 15 

Lord Russell, Earl of Bedford, on his march to relieve Ex- 
eter in August, 1549', gave the rebels who besieged that 
city so signal a defeat at Woodbury) it was rendered more 
secure by the addition of out-works on the south-south- 
west and north sides. There is a spring flowing from a 
bed of red sandstone formation just without the fosse. 
The origin of Woodbury," says this author \ without qual- 
ification, "is the British Vydhieu or Guydieu, meaning 
wood, and the Saxon byrig. Hence the Vodii and Udice 
(woody territory) of Ptolemy." 18 

In another passage, commenting on the "Alauna" men- 
tioned in Ravennas, Shortt continues : "the alauna Sylva 
at Woodbury Hill is from the British Alaun-iu, evidently 
signifying the full river or plenus amnis. There was also 
a Woodbury Hill in Worcestershire, says Camden. The 
Woodbury of Devon was probably once a pebbly sea-beach, 
upheaved by igno-aqueous agency and so were many other 
hills in the neighborhood. Woodbury camp or castle over- 
looks a great extent of country ; to the east, the Quintock 
Hills and the Isle of Portland; to the south, Berry Point 
and the rocky heights of Dartmoor. I visited it May 16, 
1836. It is of an oval or frying-pan shape, now planted, 
as well as its fosses, with fir trees by Lord Rolle. Its 
area is five acres. Woodbury, as connecting the inland 
with the maritime camps, was, it is said, of most preemi- 
nence during the time of Constantine the Great, (306-337) 
when the Saxons began to invade the shores of Britain and 



18 Exeter was besieged for thirty-five days in 1549, the ecclesiastical revolution 
under Hemy VIII being not yet lorgotten, by the men of Devon and Cornwall who 
rose in defence of the "old religion." I shall not follow Shortt in his examination 
of the works of Ptolemy, the Alexandrian geographer, who wrote about Britain in 
the second century; of the anonymous British geographer Ravennas, of the seventh 
century; nor of the "Antonini Itinerarium" a sort of Domesday Survey ordered 
by Julius Caesar, B. C. 44, the fifteenth and last iter of which ends at Exeter, the 
Excecter or Castra on the Exe. Byrig, in Saxon, means a city. 






16 NOTES ON THE 

their depredations had arrived at such a height that it was 
deemed necessary to appoint an officer entitled 'Count of 
the Saxon shore/ — Comes Saxonici JLittoris, — and dig 
nified with the appellation of jSpectabilis, 'the Honorable, 
to guard against these pirates." 

To some extent a military character has thus clung about 
the spot from the first. It seems to have been a position 
of military value as late as the ecclesiastical disturbances 
of 1549, and in the apprehension of a French invasion in 
1798 Woodbury Castle was chosen for a camping ground 
for several regiments. A park of artillery was planted 
within the old entrenchments. The same thing happened 
under like circumstances in 1803, and to-day the spot is a 
favorite parade for the reviews of the militia of Devon. 
A single vallum, about five hundred feet in length and 
about half as wide, encloses it within the ramparts, and 
Lysons says there are tumuli near it, and he thinks it of 
British origin. 19 

The natural features of this spot have been frequently 
described. A recent writer speaks with enthusiasm of 
several of them. "The extensive views and bracing air, 
mixed with the aromatic odor of wild thyme and heath 
cannot fail to exhilarate the spirit;" and again, "The bogs 
on the common, which is at the top of the ridge, are cov- 
ered with beautiful yellow flowers of bog-asphodel and 



19 See Lysons' Magna Britannia, Vol. VI, pp. cccxiii and cccl. Another eminent 
authority, Lewis of Iloniton, had addressed to the Society of Antiquaries in 1780 
a Memoir in which he traced the chain of camps which he supposed Roman sta- 
tions, afterwards occupied by the Danes, between Honiton and Exeter. Of these 
he finds that Woodbury and Hembury seem not to have assumed the form appro- 
priate to any particular people, but to have taken shape altogether from local cir- 
cumstances. The high hills of this region are to this day covered with fortifications 
known as "Dane Castles" and Risdon aupposes them to have been erected by the 
Saxons against the Danes, who greatly infested this county, and that Woodbury 
Castle was one of them. The Danes were most troublesome from 980 to 1016, but 
Alfred the Great defeated them at Exmouth, as early as 807. 



ANCIENT FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 17 

white, downy heads of cotton-sedge. The geologist should 
not fail to note the water-worn pebbles on the ridge, de- 
rived from an extensive pebble-bed which crops out on the 
summit of the range of hills and yields the pebbles which 
form the beach at Budleigh-Salterton." This writer adds 
"The ancient earth- works are still in excellent preservation 
and planted with trees which occupy the summit of the 
hill. This is called Woodbury Castle and was originally 
a British work. It was called Alauna Sylva by the Ro- 
mans." 

Risdon had spoken thus in 1630 of the place which he 
calls Woodberg and Wood bury e. "Upon the Top of a 
Hill in the waste ground the Remains of an old Fortress, 
environed with great Ditches and Banks of Earth, remain 
to be seen," and he names Woodberie in the list of "Towns 
and Places which be priviledged and free from Tax and 
Toll, such as we, in common speech, call custom-free by 
ancient Demesne." Polwhele, writing in 1797, devotes 
some space to a detailed account of the locality, from which 
an extract must suffice. He says, "Of the Hills between 
the Clyst and the Otter, Woodbury is the most remarka- 
ble. To the northeast we see from Woodbury, Black- 
down and the Quantock hills, and through a clear 
atmosphere the isle of Portland ; to the south and west, 
Berry Head and a great part of Dartmoor ; and returning 
from the extensive survey to the nearer distances we ob- 
serve the river Exe at our feet, — a beautiful line of light, 
— the richly cultivated grounds that adorn its banks, — 
and lastly the sea itself. The Parish is four and one-half 
miles long and three and one-half broad, lying on a gen- 
tle declivity and bounded by the river Exe to the west. The 
soil is the common red clay of Devon. Several streams 

HIST. COLL. XXIV 2 



18 NOTES ON THE 

rise in Woodbury. This Parish abounds with oak, elm 
and ash and the roads are good, consisting of gravel and 
pebble-stones. Woodbury Castle, that crowns the com- 
mon, gives a noble effect to the prospect. From it could be 
seen the Roman intrenchment on Windmill hill in Farring- 
don. There are eight villages in the parish. The farm 
houses are seventy. Upwards of seventy paupers are 
monthly relieved and the number of inhabitants amounts 
to 1,500." 

Partly from Polwhele, partly from the Reverend George 
Oliver's "Ecclesiastical Antiquities in Devon, " and partly 
from original sources I learn that the parish church which 
stands on a knoll near the centre of the parish, stood there 
as early as 1205, that upon the death of Sir William Bon- 
ville in 1407, who left funds for a belfry, the church was 
rebuilt with a stately campanile tower and dedicated to St. 
Swithin and reconsecrated in 1409 by Bishop Stafford. 
The church profits and rentals had been granted by Bishop 
Marshall at some unknown date to the twenty-four vicars 
of the Cathedral at Exeter " in consideration of the fatigue 
which they had to undergo in performing the Divine office 
by day and by night," and the grant was confirmed by 
Bishop Brewer in 1217. The church is of durable stone 
with a slated roof. It is eighty-five feet in length, forty in 
width, and twenty feet high. The tower, which is eighty 
feet high, is square, has two strong buttresses at each cor- 
ner, and has on its top sixteen battlements, with a weather- 
cock. It contains six deep-toned, musical bells, five of them 
bearing date respectively, A.D. 1605, 1624, 1629, 1677 
and 1737. The sixth has no date but bears a prayer to the 
Virgin, cast in the metal in old English characters. The 
church-yard is near an acre. The living in Polwhele's time 
was a vicarage with twenty acres of glebe and a residence 



ANCIENT FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 19 

in the gift of the Custos and College of Vicars Choral in 
Exeter Cathedral. The rectory is the property of these 
Vicars who are improprietors, and the officiating clergy- 
man, a perpetual curate. The parsonage house is about 
one-fourth of a mile from the church, — an old building 
not annexed to the curacy. There is, says Polvvhele, "a 
modus for cyder in the parish at 3d. a hogshead, and for 
hay, 4d. an acre ; for a cow that has a calf, 3d. ; for one 
milked without a calf, 3d." The parish registers date from 
a period not long after the dissolution of religious houses 
in 1539. The record of baptisms begins September 20, 
1557 ; that of burials, in November, 1575, and that of 
marriages in November, 1582, but neither of them con- 
tains any trace of the family name of Woodbury. The 
parish contains a commodious court house and prison for 
the use of the county magistracy. In addition to the par- 
ish church it has at Gulliford, one of its eight villages, a 
Unitarian chapel, and a Free Church built ill 1851 at 
another, as well as a meeting house supported by the fam- 
ily of Thomas Huckell Lee, Esquire, of Ebford House, 
near Lympstone. Religious differences seem not to have 
cea'sed to agitate this parish with the discipline adminis- 
tered by Earl Russell in 1549. The Dissenters had a 
chapel at Woodbury from which a much-revered pastor 
was ejected as a non-conformist, upon the restoration of 
Charles II (1660) and the "Act of Uniformity" which soon 
followed. As lately as 1850-52, a Puseyite agitation 
seems to have invaded this staid old community, which I 
find alluded to in an interesting letter printed in the His- 
tory of Bedford, New Hampshire, from the late Colonel 
Isaac O. Bjirnes, who married a sister of Judge Levi 
Woodbury, describing his visit to the parish of Woodbury, 
in Devonshire, in the summer of 1850. He says that the 



20 NOTES ON THE 

curates of the neighborhood were " hisrh-church" in their 
proclivities, while the people were all of the opposite per- 
suasion. And this difference culminated two years later 
in a very singular controversy, and a pamphlet printed at 
Exeter in 1852, bearing on its cover the following astound- 
ing title : 

INTONING : 

OR THE POSSIBILITY OP 

SAYING PRAYERS 

WITHOUT MAKING 

A SLOW PROTRACTED NOISE : 
Duly considered in a correspondence between 

THE CHURCH WARDENS AND INCUMBENT OF 

WOODBURY ; 

AL APPEALS TO 
AND HIS REPLIES THERETO. 

The parish of Woodbury is approached by rail at a sin- 
gle point. It has a station of the London and Southwest- 
ern Railway on the riverside about two miles from the 
Castle and this is known as Woodbury Road Station. No 
Woodbury s are to be found living in the neighborhood, 
nor buried there since the period within which "Decay's 
effacing fingers" still permit us to read the "sermons in 
stones" that lie scattered amongst the churchyard mould. 
No trace of Manor House nor Knightly Hall remains, with 
which the name of Woodbury can be connected — no 
stately effigy, no storied urn, no bronze memorial nor clois- 
tered vault to show that such a race had ever been. And 
we are as completely thrown back upon our unaided fancy 



ANCIENT FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 21 

to reproduce the stirring scenes and romantic incidents of 
the times of the Conquest and of the Crusades, — of the 
recalcitrant Barons and the weak King John, — as though 
no Domesday Survey had ever catalogued each ox and 
sheep, cotter and serf and mill and plough upon that old 
domain ; as though no castellan of " our Castell of Ex- 
cester" had ever signed himself " Lord of Woodbiry by 
ye Kinge's grant ;" as though no Baron summoned for 
high treason as "de Wodbyry, Miles," had ever defied 
King John and been restored to his estates by his son and 
successor Henry III ; as though the Manor of Wuclebury 
had never been held in capite of the King (in the language 
of the Rotuli Clausi for the tenth year of Edward III) 
upon a fine or rental of three barbed arrows and one oat- 
meal cake of the value of half a farthing, to be rendered 
as often as the kin": should go hunting in the forest of 
Dartmoor. 20 



20 From the Placita de Quo Warranto for the year 9-10 of Edward I, it appears 
that in the year 1282 the title to Woodbury Manor was put in issue by the erection 
of a gibbet and stocks thereon, a mode of asserting baronial rights in vogue as 
late as the French Revolution and resorted to among others by Voltaire at Fer- 
ney, and also by the claim of an assize of bread and ale and of free warren and of 
the power of life and death generally, and William Albemarle de Wodebery was 
summoned to Exeter to show by what right he set up these claims of seigniory. 
He satisfied a jury that he and his ancestors had held from a time "a quo non ex- 
istat memorial And it appears from a list of Devonshire fees and holdings in. 
Testa de Nevill (1216-1307) that, through their ancestor Geoffrey, the family had 
held since Henry I (1100-1135) :•" Galfridus de Alba Mar' tenet Manerium de W'debir' 
cumpertinentijs, in capite de domino Jlege, per servicium unius militis, de dono Regis 
H.prirni antecessor ib us suis per idem servicium. ,> And it further appears from the 
same source that some "de Wodebery" had been in default in this condition of 
furnishing for forty days a knight accoutred at his own cost, and hence some of 
their dignities had been forfeited accordingly. " Sergantia Reginaldi de Alba Mar- 
Ha in Wodebery pro qua debuit invenire domino Regi unum servientem equitem et 
armatum per xl dies super custum proprium in exercitu suo alienata est in perpetui- 
tate." All this just after the death of King John. How far these matters connect 
themselves with the disturbances which resulted in the signing of Magna Charta 
by that unhappy monarch, under a sort of duress, June 15, 1215, I cannot deter- 
mine. But Henry III came to the throne in 1216, and among the first acts of his 



22 NOTES ON THE 

But whatever mystery may enshroud the origin or the 
final disappearance of the famous family so long identified 
with the Manor of Woodbury, the history of that ancient 
estate is perfectly well made out from the Norman Con- 
quest down to the time of the departure of the "Old 
Planter," John Woodbury, to take his part in the planting 
of New England. Before twenty years of his usurpation 
were complete, William the Conqueror had procured to 
be made, through a royal commission, an exhaustive in- 
ventory of the realm of which he had so unceremoniously 
possessed himself, and this has been sacredly preserved, 
and forms to-day the basis of all land tenures in a large part 
of England. It has been well described by Lowndes as 
"the most ancient record in the Kingdom and the register 
from which judgment was to be given upon the value, 
tenure and services of the land therein described," and 
by Taylor as " one of our most precious national pOSSeS- 



reign we find him making haste to restore the status quo ante helium. For we read 
in Iiotuli Litterarum Clausarum for the first half year of Henry III u Begin? de 
AlbemarV rediit ad fidem et seroicium nostrum." Having thus renewed his alle- 
giance, Sir Reginald is to have instant seizin of all his inheritance in Devonshire 
6iieh as his father, Geoffrey, had on the day of his treason to King John, — "die qua 
recessit a fide et servicio do mini Begis J. patris nostri." 

Before the end of the century the Lords of Woodbury seem to have been in full 
favor. The writs for 1277 show Willelmus de Alba Marl' (and de AubemarV) of 
Devon represented in the expedition of that year against " Lewelin, Prince of 
Wales" by the service of half a knight's fee in Wodebir performed by Beginaldus 
de Ilouleham, Serviens, on his behalf. And ten years later the same William is 
commissioned by Edward I, one of the Conservators of the Peace for the County 
of Devon. Testa de Nevill covers the period from 1216 to 1307, and records in his 
list of Knights' Fees, held in the County of Oevon, one held by Wilt'us de Wodebere in 
Wodebere, of the honor of Gloucester, and one held by Begin'' de Alba Mara in 
Wodebire, "de domino Bege." I find from the writs for 1316, that the Villa de Wode- 
bury with NotewUle and Limeneston, " qum sunt membra, ad eandem," were still 
among the King's possessions in IJudlcigh Hundred, and that Golfridus JJaumarle 
was Lord of theni all. And in 1337 it appears from the Botuli Clausi that the 
Manor of Wodcbyry had been held of the King, by William the son of William de 
Aumarle upon the nominal fine and rental named in the text, and a life interest 
for the life of William senior seems at that time to have beeu given to the parson 
(" persona ecclesiai") of the church of Alvardeston. 



ANCIENT FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 23 

sions ; a unique treasure, the like of which no other land 
can show." This remarkable survey is called " Domesday 
Book," — perhaps a corruption of Domus Dei, because the 
two originals were early deposited for safety in the Cathe- 
drals at Exeter and Winchester. The copy known as the 
Exeter or Exon Domesday is thought to be the earlier, since 
it is fuller in detail. The other, the Exchequer Domesday, 
more condensed but covering substantially the same matter, 
is thought to have been prepared from the returns embod- 
ied in the first, and to have been intended as the final and 
official form of this most interesting work. The survey was 
completed in the years 1085-6, the last year of William's 
life and reign. I am fortunate in being able to present to 
the curious reader an exact reproduction of the passage in 
the Exchequer Domesday which relates to the Manor of 
Woodbury. 21 The great record is divided first by counties. 
Then- under each county we have in subdivisions the 
names of the manors and other estates held by the King 
and those claiming under him by royal gift, and by the 
church, and then follow the estates of other persons of 
various degrees of consideration. Under the general head 



21 The fac-simile introduced corresponds with the original in size and in every 
particular save color, being executed by a process which cannot err. Of course 
the ink of Domesday is faded and the vellum upon which it is engrossed is tinged 
with age. The capital letters in Domesday are picked out in vermilion and the 
proper names, such as" Wodeberie" and "St. Michael," seem to be emphasized by 
a line running through, rather than under them, which is of the same strong color. 
I omit the long catalogue of the copious Domesday literature which has accumu- 
lated mainly since the reign of George III, because the eighth centennial celebra- 
tion of the completion of the Survey has just occurred and has produced a new 
crop of studies, commentary, criticism and discussion, soon to appear in print, 
which may be expected to supersede to some extent the older works. It will 
perhaps suffice to cite Sir Henry Ellis"-General Introduction to Domesday Book;" 
Robert Kelham's " Domesday Illustrated;" Rev. R. W. Eyton's "Key to Domes- 
day," and the Devonshire Historical Association's "Devon Domesday." Some 
valuable observations will be found in Charles Gowen Smith's " Translation of 
Domesday for Lincolnshire," pp. xiii to xlviii and 26i-8. 



24 NOTES ON THE 

of "Devenescire, Terra Baldwini, vice Com'tis," sixth 
in a list of nine estates reserved by the Conqueror himself 
[Rex Willelmus Tenet] to his own use [Terra Regis] 
under a subcaption which reads "H^o subsequentia 
Maneria tenuit Ghida, Mater Heraldi Comitis," we 
have the following entry : 

Amplifying this much condensed statement into the 
barbarous Latin of the period, it reads thus : 

( Wodeberie T. R. E. [tempore regis Eduuardi] gel- 
dabat pro x Jtidis. Terra est xxxv carucis. In dominio 
sunt ii carucas et vi servi et xxx villani et xxii bordarii cum 
xx carucis. Ibi molinus reddens vii solidos et vi denarios. 
Ibi xxx acrce prati et ccc acrce pastures, Silva i leuca 
longitudine et dimidia leuca latitudine. JReddit xxiii li- 
bras ad pensum. Ante Balduinum xviii libras. 

" Ecclesia Saudi Michaelis tenet cecclesiam hujus Ma- 
nerii cum i liida et una virgata et dimidio ferling. Valet 
xx Solidos. " 

From the Exeter Domesday I extract the following, 
transmuted like the former passage into the corrupted 
Latin of the time : 

' r Udeberia. Bex habet i Mavsionem quas vocatur Wode- 
heria quam tenuit Guitda ea die qua rex Eduuardus fuit 
uiuus et mortuus et reddidit gildum pro x hidis. Has 
possunt arare xxxv carrucas. Inde habet rex v hidas et ij 
carucas in dominio. Et uillani v hidas et xx carrucas 



ANCIENT FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 25 

lbi habet rex xxx uillanos et xxij bordarios et vj servos et ij 
roncinos et xv animalia et iiij porcos et Ix oues et i molendi- 
num qui reddit vij solidos et vi denarios i leugam nemoris 
in longitudine et dimidiam in latitudine et xxx agros prati 
et ccc agros pascuce. Hcec reddit xxiij libras ad pensum 
et quando Balduinus recepit xviij libras. 

" Inde habet abbas 8ancti Michaelis de Monte ecclesiam 
et terram quam tenuit sacerdos ea die qua rex Eduuardus 
fuit uiuus et mortuus. Hoc est dimidia hida et i uirga et 
dimidium ferlinum et ualet per annum xx solidos cum 
communi pascua." 

From all this the Latin scholar, though he might have 
found very serious difficulty in deciphering the barbarous 
contractions, elisions and omissions of the original man- 
uscript, will very readily gather that the Manor of Wood- 
bury during a portion of the reign of Edward the 
Confessor, which covered the period from A. D. 1042 to 
1066, and on the day of his decease, was in the possession 
and enjoyment of the Countess, sometimes called Queen 
Gytha, Ghida, or Guecla, the mother of Earl Harold who 
fell at Hastings, herself a sister of the King of Denmark. 
That it then had a mansion and paid tax for ten hides to 
the Dane-geld. That it embraced as much land as could 
be cultivated with thirty-five ploughs. Five hides of the 
land and two ploughs belonged to the King in demesne, 
and the villeins or farm-hands had the other five hides and 
twenty ploughs. Of these villeins or farm-hands the King 
had there thirty, with twenty -two bordars, or cotters, and 
six serfs or house-servants. It had a mill which rendered 
seven shillings and six pence, and it was stocked with two 
pack-horses, fifteen head of cattle, four swine and sixty 
sheep. It comprised thirty acres of meadow or mowing 
land, three hundred acres of pasture, and woodland one 
leuga or league in length and half as wide. The Manor 

HIST. COLL. XXIV 2* 



26 NOTES ON THE 

■was, under the Normans, doomed for twenty-three pounds 
by weight of metal, but before the time of Baldwin it only 
paid eighteen pounds. This Baldwin who raised the taxes 
seems to have been no other than Earl Baldwin de Sap, 
one of King William's generals at Hastings, a favorite who 
married a niece of the Conqueror and was by him created 
hereditary sheriff of Devon and was required by the 
King's order, out of the perquisites of this lucrative 
w Sherriffewicke of Devenescire," to build Exeter Castle. 22 
This famous record concludes by stating that the abbot 
of St. Michael de Monte had the right of presentation to 
the church of the Manor, and held the lands which were 
in the occupancy of the priest on the day on which King 
Edward was alive and dead — the last day of his life. 
These were worth yearly twenty shillings with common of 
pasture. There seems to be a question whether the Saint 
Michael's referred to was the church of St. Michael de 
monte, on the coast of Cornwall, or the earlier, greater 
and richer St. Michael de monte inpericulo maris across 
the channel, the famous Norman monastery of the eighth 
century, built on a storm-lashed, isolated rock, three hun- 
dred feet high and accessible only at low tide, of which the 
Cornish St. Michael's was a dependency before 1085 and 
to which the Manor of Budleigh, Roger Conant's birth- 
place, adjoining Woodbury, in fact belonged. 23 

" See Freeman's " Norman Conquest," Vol. IV, pp. 99-108 ; Vol. V, pp. 490-494, 
Appendix A. The microscopic scrutiny, to which Woodbury Manor and every 
other estate covered by the Domesday survey was subjected by the Conqueror, 
will be found to justify the complaint of the contemporary Saxon Chronicler of 
1085,— "So very narrowly he caused it to be traced out that there was not one sin- 
gle hyde nor one yard of land, nor even an ox nor a cow nor a swine was left, that 
was not set down in his writ." 

"Pole writing before 1035 says, p. 94, "Budleigh, whence the whole hundred 
hath its name, was sometyme belongingeunto y e Abbey of S fc . Michael de Monte in 
J'ericulo Maris," which Kelham in his "Domesday Illustrated" has described as a 
magnificent Benedictine Abbey, romantically situated on a rock three hundred 
feet high, covered with the sea twice a day, much resembling its namesake on St. 
Michael's Mount in Cornwall, annexed to it by Robert Earl of Moreton and Corn- 
wall before 1085. See "Dugdale's Monasticon," Vol. II, p. 949 and "Alien Priories," 
Vol. I, p. 145. 



ANCIENT FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 27 

After the death of William the Conqueror (1087) , I find 
no trace of Woodbury Manor until the reign of his second 
son Henry I, who succeeded William Rufus, A. D. 1100. 
Sir William Pole says of Woodbury, "This mannor did 
Kinge Henry I give unto Eogerus de Maunsdevilla, Cas- 
tellan of his Castell of Excester." So then the Mande- 
villes were the ancestors (antecessores) from whom Geof- 
frey Daumerle or Damarell proved his title in the time of 
Henry III, and William Damarell in the time of Edward 
I. "Stephan de Maunsdevilla, his sonne," continues Pole, 
« w th ye ii cens f Kinge Henry II, granted y e same unto 
Will a m Carbonell and Roger de Maunsdevill confirmed y e 
grant of Stephan, his father, unto Will a m, sonne to y e said 
Will a m Carbonell." Doubtless the elder William had mar- 
ried a daughter of Mandeville. Both the Mandevilles and 
the Carbonells were known after the fashion of the times, 
as de Woodbury. Here then was a "distinguished house" 
of de Woodbury with which the Damarells might have 
connected themselves, as Polwhele says they did, and in 
this he follows Risdon's remark about the ancient Lords 
Damarell, "a name that dispersed itself into many families, 
as Woodberg, ..." But Pole leaves no doubt on the 
point. He shows "Mabill, y e daughter of Carbonell," 
married unto Galfride de Albamarlea, who became "Lord 
of Wodbiry"in the reign of Richard I (1189-1199). < 24 > 
Through a long line of descent carefully traced by Pole and 
quoted by Polwhele, which I will not insert, the manor 
came, on the death of Sir William Damarell, Knight, 
"wh ch died Anno 36 of Kinge Edward III [1363] leaving 
issue Marg'et, wife of Sir Will a m Bonvill of Shute, 



24 This was "Coeur de Lion," the first Sovereign of England who fought in the 
Crusades. See Mills's "History of Chivalry," Vol. I, p. 252. 



28 NOTES ON THE 

Knight," to the Bonvills. The Bonvills shared the com- 
mon fortunes of those 

"Brave days of old 
When Knights were bold 
And Barons held their sway," 

and after them we hear little of the Manor of Woodbury. 
In 1449, William, LordBonville was summoned to parlia- 
ment as Baron Bonville. He was beheaded after the bat- 
tle of St. Alban's, 1461, by Queen Margaret of Anjou for 
having espoused the cause of Edward IV. His only son 
had died in battle at Wakefield a few months before, and 
his granddaughter and heiress was married to Thomas 
Grey, Marquis of Dorset. Her son Henry Grey, Duke 
of Suffolk and Marquis of Dorset, possessed the Manor 
of Woodbury in 1554, when he lost his estates and his 
head in an attempt to place that ill-starred beauty, his 
daughter Lady Jane, on the throne of England. "And 
soe," continues Pole of the Manor of Woodbury, "beinge 
escheated into the Crown, John Pridaux, Sergeant-at-law, 
purchased the same, and it is nowe [1604-1635] the land 
of Sir Thomas, his grandchild." 

But while the records give us little further trace of a 
Woodbury Manor or a Woodbury family in the ancient 
parish since Edward III (Lysons says the " Damarells of 
Woodbury" became extinct through failure of issue male, 
in the reign of Edward III) another Manor in the Parish 
of Woodbury comes into notice whose history is full of 
interest. This is the estate now known as Nutwell 
Court, and formerly as Notewille, and Notewell, thought 
to be a corruption of " Neot's Well," the Saxon word for 
a well being wille. Oliver de Dinham seems to have 
held it as early as Henry II (1154-1189) and Geoffry 
Dammerle de Woodbiry, Knight, in the Keign of Edward 



ANCIENT FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 29 

II (1307-1327), but in the time of Richard II (1377- 
1399) it seems to be again in the possession of a Johan- 
nes de Dynham, Miles, together with Woodbury Manor 
and Villa and a long list of other estates. Pole has said 
of it, " Nutwell was long tyme sithens given by y e ances- 
tors of Dinham unto y e priory of Dinham or Dynam, 
in little Britayne, and, after y e resumynge of y e lands 
y* aliens held, restored unto Sir John Dinham, whoe 
bwylded a fay re howse and dwelled there." He then 
traces its descent, through Sargeant John Prideaux, the 
same who purchased Woodbury Manor on the attainder 
of Suffolk, and says he " hath left it for the dwellynge 
howse of his posterity and nowe [1604-1635] it is the man- 
sion howse of Sir Thomas Prideaux, Knight." 25 Tristram 
Risdon has described it at about the same period. "In this 
parish of Woodburye is Nutwell, sometime a castle, but 
when it came to the Lord Dynham" [John Dinham, born 
1430, probably at Nutwell ; by Henry YII made Lord 
High Treasurer, Knight of the Garter, etc. ; died 1502] 
w he altered it and made it a fair and stately dwelling- 
house. It lieth very low by an arm of the sea, so as the 
high floods rise almost to the House. It is open only 
to the West, being defended otherwise with little Hills. 
This Nutwell Court (which signifies a mansion-house in a 
seigniory) came to the family of Prideaux and is now the 
dwelling of Sir Thomas, Knight, etc." Lysons, Pol- 
whele, and the Reverend John Prince give further account 
of this famous old manor. Says Prince in his " Worthies 



25 Of these Prideauxs was undoubtedly that Brigadier General John, son of Sir 
John Prideaux of Devonshire, baronet, who was killed in the trenches before 
Niagara in the " old French war," July 19, 1759. He had been entrusted by Pitt 
with the difficult task of reducing Fort Niagara, then one of the most formidable 
works in the country. See Drake's " American Biography." 



30 NOTES ON THE 

of Devon" 26 written before 1697 : "Nutwell in the Parish of 
Woodbiry is about six miles south from Exeter on the 
east side of the river Exe, just opposite to Powderham 
Castle, which stands on the west." 27 This writer follows 
the authorities I have cited and speaks of the "little hills 
that semi-circle it," and of the spring tides which "at high 
flood rise almost to the outer gate of the house, unto 
which is belonging a very handsome chappel adjoyning to 
a spacious dining-room at the east end thereof." 28 

The Earl of March, soon after crowned as Edward IV, 
was engaged, in 1460-1, in a sanguinary effort to wrest 



28 " Lives of Most Famous Divines, Statesmen, Swordsmen, Physicians, Writ- 
ers and other eminent persons, natives of that most noble province, from before 
the Roman Conquest down to the present age, are memorized in an alphabetical 
order out of the most approved authors both in print and manuscript." All this 
and more on the title page of the " Worthies of Devon" with the following admi- 
rable motto, which I have seen elsewhere on the arms of Edward Chester, and the 
author's quaint if inelegant rendering of it. 

" Nam Genus et Proavos el quaz non fecimus ipsi, 
" Vix ea nostra voco!" 

Ovid, Metam., Lib. XIII. 
" Those mighty glorious things I 

" Our ancestors have done 
" But ha'n't performed ourselves 
44 We scarce may call our own." 
27 Powderham Castle is and has long been the seat of the Earls of Devon. 
When it was besieged by the Parliamentary forces during the Commonwealth, 
Nutwell was garrisoned for that army also. The river Exe, flowing between them, 
is a mile wide at this point— an arm of the sea. Rev. Hugh Peters' " Relation" of 
the fall of the Royalist Stronghold is as follows: " Powtheram Castle taken, 1646, 
by Sir Thomas Fairfax, with the Governour, Major, 120 officers and common soul- 
diers, 5 barrells of Gunpowder, great store of Match & Bullet & all the Prince's army 
& ammunition therein. 40 horse taken in pursuit of the enemy, Lord Wentworth's 
letter, the Scout-Master General's letter and other letters that were sent from 
Prince Charles unto the King." 

38 Since Edward III (1327-1377) the Dinhams have held Nutwell and have al- 
ways been Knights and always named John, and accordingly " being denomi- 
nated from this their seat," have been continuously known as Sir John Dinham 
of Nutwell. The family was French and had a " Castel Dinant" in Brittany. An 
Oliver de Dinant " came into this realm in assistance of William the Conqueror." 
Lord Dinham dying in 1502 without issue, the estate passed to Sergeant John Pri- 
deaux, and so to its present owners. 



ANCIENT FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 31 

from Margaret of Anjou, consort of the imbecile Henry 
VI, the supremacy of England. During the varying for- 
tunes of the struggle his partisans were once reduced to 
the extremity of secreting the young prince in the neigh- 
borhood of Exeter, and with the Earls of Salisbury and 
"Warwick in his suite he repaired to Nutwell. Perhaps 
this is the most notable event in the history of that manor- 
house, although for centuries (Lysons, Vol. VI, pp. iv- 
xx) the Welsh and the Danes vied with each other in 
making life uncertain in the southern country, and the 
"Wars of the Roses and of the Revolution surged about its 
walls, and later still, in 1688, William of Orange landed 
at Torbay and marched by on his way to Exeter to pro- 
claim himself King of England. The event is chronicled 
in the " Worthies of Devon" where it appears that these 
august fugitives were brought safely into Devonshire and 
"hid themselves awhile at this gentleman's [the last Sir 
John's] house at Nutwell." This and other services so far 
endeared him to the young prince and the Duke of York, 
his father, that upon the accession of the former he found 
himself in high favor at court, and ultimately rose to be 
Lord High Treasurer of England. In the twelfth year 
of Edward IV, we find him "retained to serve the King 
in his fleet at sea with 3,580 soldiers and mariners," and 
three years later again, " for four months with 3,000 men." 
As late as Charles I [1625-1649], says Pole, the title 
of Nutwell was still in Sir Thomas Prideaux, and about 
1660, Sir Henry Ford, twice Secretary of State for Ireland 
under Charles II, a famous wit and bon vivanl of his day, 
purchased, says Prince, "the Manor or part of the Manor 
of Woodberry and therein Nutwell Court and Barten, 
which he made the place of his future abode. He died 
here about the sixty-fifth year of his age and lieth interred 



32 NOTES ON THE 

in the parish church of Woodberry unto which his house 
belongeth." 

About 1700 this now famous seat seems to have belonged 
to a son of Sir Henry Pollexfen, Lord Chief Justice of the 
Common Pleas, and through an intermarriage with the 
Drakes to have come to Sir Francis Henry Drake, the col- 
lateral representative and heir of Sir Francis Drake, the 
great admiral of Queen Elizabeth's reign, circumnaviga- 
tor of the globe, and destroyer of the Armada. 29 Drake 
left no issue. There is at Nutwell Court a portrait of the 
old Sea-fighter, represented as wearing the miniature of 
Elizabeth, which was given him by that Queen herself. 
This very miniature, the work of Vincentio Vincentini, is, 
with other relics, in the possession of the present occu- 
pant. Nutwell is embowered in trees and shrubbery in 
the midst of a park of seventy-six acres and is to-day the 
seat of Sir Francis George Augustus Fuller Eliott Drake, 
Baronet. A sister of Sir Francis Henry Drake was the 
wife of a famous military hero, Lord Heathfield, 30 and Sir 
Francis, dying in 1794, left Nutwell Court to his nephew, 



29 Carew, a contemporary eulogist, applied to Drake words which would seem to 
be the antitype of one of Webster's best known and most admired periods, in speak- 
ing of" that liquid line, wherewith (as an emulator of the Sonne's Glorie) he en- 
compassed the world." 

»° The Right Honorable George Augustus Eliott, Lord Heathfield, Baron Gib- 
raltar, was a very conspicuous figure at the close of the last century. He was a 
most accomplished soldier. His education comprised a university course at Ley- 
den, a military course in Vauban's Ecole Royale and volunteer service in the army 
of Prussia. All this before his eighteenth year, which found him in the engineer 
corps at Woolwich, and soon after he was acting as adjutant in the horse-grena- 
diers. In the service of Germany, which he entered next, he was wounded at 
Dettingen, and after several promotions he became aid-de-camp to King George 
II. He created the first corps of light dragoons, known as "Eliott's Light Horse." 
After many marked distinctions he was, at a most critical period, made Military Gov- 
ernor of Gibraltar, and there, with a mere handful of men, withstood for the four 
years from 1779 to 1783 the combined fury of the French and Spanish attack. The 
skill and spirit displayed in this crisis have had few parallels. Closely shut up; 
threatened with famine and disease as well as continuous assault; the little gar- 



ANCIENT FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 33 

the second Lord Heathfield, but it has reverted to and still 
remains in the Drake family. 

I shall close this paper with a brief allusion to another es- 
tate in Devonshire known from 1243 to this day as Wood- 
bury Court. It lies at Plymtree, an hour's drive from 
Exeter, and doubtless was once the seat of some cadet 
branch of the Woodbury family, although the rector of 
the parish assures me that it has not been the property of 
any person bearing that name since the fourteenth cen- 
tury. The parish register of Plymtree covers the period 
from 1538 to 1648 and no trace of such a family appears 
there. Lysons says the Court "gave name to a family," 
and spells the name Woodbeare. Pole says of "Wood- 
beere near Plymtree," "Will a m de Woodbeare held anno 
27 of Kinge Henry 3 [1243] & anno 24 of Kinge Edw. 
[1296] Kobert de Woodbear ; from Woodbeare by Julian 
(de Woodbeare) it came to Will m Daunay & contynewed 
unto Kinge Henry 4 tyme, y* John Dauney left it unto 
his daughters." Pole traces the estate to a much later day 
when it came to an heiress "whose daughters' husbands 
dismembered the same amongst the tenants and others." 
There seem to be now a higher or upper Woodbury, a 



rison was stimulated by his faith and controlled by his will until the complete mas- 
tery he gained over the natures of the men whose fate was in his hands, and the 
success which resulted, made him the hero of the hour. The first man in the for- 
tress to greet the morning sun and the last to retire, alert and unwearied, a model 
for everybody of abstemiousness in food and wine, habituated to severe exercise 
and rigid discipline, generous to others as he was pitiless to himself, it was found 
impossible to starve out a position with such a commander, or to capture it by sur- 
prise, or to weaken it by disease. The eyes of Europe were watching his achieve- 
ment and its final triumph won him every honor. A grand historic painting of the 
" Siege of Gibraltar," by John Singleton Copley, Lord Heathfield being the cen- 
tral figure and giving orders for the rescue of some drowning sailors from a hostile 
frigate wrecked by his guns, may be seen in the recently formed gallery of the 
City of London at Guild Hall, and a portrait of Lord Heathfield, summoned by 
the Spanish commandant to deliver up the keys of the fortress in 1782, one of the 
noblest works from the brush of Sir Joshua Reynolds, hangs at the National Gal- 
lery in Trafalgar Square. 

HIST. COLL. XXIV 3 



34 NOTES ON THE 

lower "Woodbury and a middle Woodbury. Polwhele, 
quoting Pole, adds of Plymtree parish, "it seems to be 
disfranchised in the upper part, Woodbeer claiming one 
part, Little Woodbeer another and the Dean of Exeter 
another. . . . Towards the northeast part of the parish 
is an old mansion called Woodbeer Court. . . . The 
mansion house is built of cob and thatched, the walls be- 
ing above four feet thick. It is surrounded with gardens 
and orchards and high walls and has a dreary appearance, 
resembling those mansions of old said to be haunted with 
ghosts and spectres. It is let to a farmer." 31 

Later travellers have described it differently, and the 
photographic views before me give the old mansion, sur- 
rounded with its fresh Devonshire sward, shrubbery and 
hedge rows and its ample barns, anything but a dreary 
aspect. In restoring an old porch a few years ago the 
material at that point was found to be very small sun-dried 
brick, which carries its origin back to a very remote date. 



81 The church of St. John Baptist at Plymtvee is gothic and is one of the finest 
and most ancient, besides being the chief, in the Deanery. Nicholas Monk, a 
brother of the famous general and soldier of fortune, George Monk, was Rector 
here in 1625-1G43. It is a stone structure of eighty by thirty-five feet, with roof of 
6late, and a square, ivy-mantled tower sixty feet high and crumbling with age. 
It consists of a nave and chancel at the angle of which traces of a confessional are 
still to be made out. It has four bells, two of them extremely old and bearing mot- 
toes cast in their metal ; the others showing only their dates. One motto reads, in 
old British characters, 

"|)r0t£ge, sUJirgo |)ia! 

"(IjJiios Confaaco, jsantta gparia!" 
a universal prayer which has been roughly rendered: 
"Holy Virgin I Prosper all 

"Whom, with brazen lips, I call 1" 
and the tower bears on its western corner a mutilated statue of the Virgin and 
Child. There are scraps of stained glass in this little village church and the 
ecreen, which dates from Henry VII, is famous. Beautifully carved and gilded, 
its lower panels present figures of various Saints painted in the manner of the il- 
luminations of ancient popish missals and manuscripts of the early church. They 
are the delight of art-students, are often photographed and painted, and have 
been thought of sufficient art- value and archaic interest by the present rector to 
justify him in the publication of an illustrated volume depicting and describing 
thorn. For a full account of IMymtree, see Polwhele, Vol. Ill, pp. 262-5, Lysons, 
Vol. VI, pp. 417-18, Mozley's "Henry VII, Prince Arthur and Cardinal Morton," 
pp. 4, 187-0. 






1449195 

ANCIENT FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 35 

It is a quaint, low-roofed old farmhouse with rambling 
passage ways, rough, hand-hewn rafters and a prodigious 
kitchen, and shows many traces of its extreme antiquity. 
''The house," says the present rector, "is so substantially 
built that it is likely to last little changed for centuries 
more. There are but two estates in the parish of more 
value and importance." 

I would be glad to designate some single spot as cer- 
tainly, or at least presumably, the birthplace of John Wood- 
bury, the pioneer, but this I am unable to do. Further 
research may yet bring to light the needful facts. I state 
what I know, and leave the wide and inviting field of con- 
jecture to those who have a fancy to wander in it. What 
is known on this point is briefly told. "Humffrey", the 
son of the "Old Planter", made a deposition in 1680, the 
last year of his life, from which it appears that he was liv- 
ing in "Summersetshire" in 1624, when his "father John 
Woodberye did remove for New England," and that he 
"then travelled with him as far as Dorchester." An estate 
of Wodebergh and a family of Daumerle or Damarell, 
have been traced in Somerset from 1304. Burlescombe, 
a Devon parish just on the border of Somerset, shows more 
Woodburys on its register from 1580 to 1632 than any 
spot yet found in England. It is the next parish to Hal- 
berton where John de Albemarle was a landholder in 
1256, and to Ash or Esse, where Pole finds Julian de 
Woodbeare holding an estate in 1346 as well as at Plym- 
tree, and where Testa de Nevill shows Will'us de Wode- 
bere holding a Knight's fee at some date between 1216 
and 1307. Sir John Popham, the famous Chief Justice of 
the King's Bench, who was so deeply interested in the 
New England venture, had "a stately dwellinge howse" 
five miles away, as well as another at East Buclleigh. 
There were John Woodburys taxed here at the end of 



36 NOTES ON THE 

Elizabeth's reign and the beginning of that of King James. 
And wherever there were Woodburys there were Johns. 
In 1355-7, John de Wodebur appears in the Koll of Arch- 
ers on Foot for ninety-one days' service. It was then 
that three armies were marshalling for France and the 
army for Giiyenne under the Black Prince fought Septem- 
ber 19, 1356, the decisive battle of Poictiers in which the 
English foot-archers did such fearful execution on the 
French, and in which King John of France was taken pris- 
oner. In 1390 the "de" in these names is falling into dis- 
use 32 and we have plain John Wodebury recovering £10 
and costs at an assize in that year, the thirteenth of Rich- 
ard II, in an action for disseizin near Teignmouth. In 
1407, Johannes Wodbury signs a bond in administration 
on the estate of Thomas Gorges, and in 1525 and 1543 
one or more Johns Wodebury, Woodbeare, Woodbayre 
and Woodbirre are taxed as domiciled between Exeter and 
the Somerset border. 

The Burlescombe family also bore other common Wood- 
bury names besides John, such as William, James or Jacob, 
and Nicholas ; in fact, the neighborhood swarmed with them. 
Close by Burlescombe is South Petherton where the Old 
Planter's brother William, who followed him to New Eii£- 
land before 1631 and became the progenitor of a numer- 
ous and distinguished family in Maine and New Hampshire, 
intermarried with Elizabeth Patch, January 29, 1616. In 
1618, their son Nicholas, in 1620, their son William, and 
in 1622, their son Andrew, were baptized in the same 
parish, and all these came with their parents to Salem. 
The Assize Rolls for the twenty-second year of Henry III 



» 2 As late as 1343 one "William de Wodyabera with William his son" is litigating 
at the Devon Assizes over an estate within a half hour's walk of Woodbeare Court 
and, in J:570, "William Wodebere, the son of William" [having dropped the Norman 
de] was still engaged in litigation over a portion of the same disputed acres. 



ANCIENT FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 37 

show us an earlier William de Widebergh or Wudber who 
seems, in 1237-8, to have been in too active sympathy with 
the church militant. He is complained of with four others, 
one of whom is Parson John of Hambury, " for that they 
took the complainants and detained them and carried off 
their belts and their horns and the corn of two acres of 
land. " "William de Widebergh came into court and was 
in mercy." But the King's Bench records for 1248-9 show 
this same William in the estimable character of peace- 
maker, for he settles a family feud by buying out his kins- 
man Roger, the son of Richard de Wodeburghe, and pays 
him twelve marks of silver for a quit-claim of his land in 
Wydebyrre. This may be the William who in 1276 set 
up a gallows in the beautiful Manor of Lustleigh, near 
Exeter, with other claims of lordship all of which were 
challenged in court, but I do not know the issue. In 1527 
and 1581 Woodburys bearing the name of William were 
still paying taxes near Exeter. 

The name Nicholas Woodbury, which appears in the tax 
and subsidy lists of the neighborhood from 1327 to 1543, 
seems to have been borne in the former year by a repre- 
sentative of the family, Nicholas de Wodebury, whose in- 
clinations were somewhat iconoclastic and who was not as 
careful as William of the "belts and horns" had been, a cen- 
tury before; to indulge his pugnacity in the interest of the 
church. We find him arraigned at the Easter Week As- 
sizes for the nineteenth year of Edward II (1326), with 
a number of co-respondents of eminent respectability, 
charged with disseizing the Abbot of Tor of twenty -six 
acres of land with appurtenances. Next, we find him at 
Hilary Term among thirty defendants, charged by the 
Abbot of Tor and Benedict, a brother Canon, with grossly 
assaulting the latter, and at Michaelmas Term the case 



38 NOTES ON THE 

still drags along, being still farther aggravated and embar- 
rassed by the subsequent pounding and general maltreat- 
ment administered, during its progress, to still another 
Canon of Tor Abbey. This Tor Abbey, a little south of 
Exmouth, was a monastery of the order of monks calling 
themselves Prsemonstratensians and, if anything could 
palliate the offence committed, it would seem that such a 
name as that ought to be taken into consideration. 

In the Burlescombe parish records, the first John men- 
tioned is Johannes Woodberye, who intermarries with 
Joanna Humffreys, June 21, 1596. Humffrey, the Old 
Planter's son, it is asserted, upon what authority I do not 
know, was born in 1607, 8, or 9, — evidently conjecture 
and not the testimony of an English record. The temp- 
tation is very strong to regard this Johannes of Burles- 
combe as the father, and Joanna Humffrey as the mother 
of Humffrey Woodberye. But on the one hand we are 
confronted with the fact that the name Humffrey does not 
then appear in the family for the first time, for among 
other instances there is a summons against Umfredum de 
Wodyber in the King's Bench for the thirteenth year of 
Edward 1(1285). On the other hand it should be known 
that one "Joanna, wife of John Woodberye" was buried at 
Bnrlcscombe, June 5, 1601. John and Joanna are both 
names of frequent occurrence there and this last named 
Joanna may have been another than Joanna Humffreys. 
Or the birth of Humffrey Woodbury may have been erro- 
neously placed too late. If born before 1601, his journey 
to Dorchester, to see the Old Planter off for New England 
in 1624, would seem to have been a more natural, because 
a more helpful proceeding than if he were born in 1609. 
For sentimental journeying was not in vogue with the 
Devonshire roundheads of those days. We have only to 



ANCIENT FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 39 

await the facts and welcome new light, prepared to aban- 
don, if we must, this Burlescombe entry as the veritable 
record of the marriage of the Old Planter. 

I must leave it to others to trace out the record of this 
sturdy Devon family since their appearance in New Eng- 
land. The story does not lack incident. Early inter- 
marriages with Conants, Thorndikes, Reas, Putnams, 
Herricks, Trasks, Batchelders and Dodges show that they 
were careful to mingle theirs with as good blood as the little 
colony afforded, and town and parish records in Beverly and 
other homes of their adoption show that the blood did not 
degenerate. John, the pioneer, spoken of with a certain 
kindly reverence not often to be Looked for in official rec- 
ords, as "brother Woodbry" and as "father Woodbry,'' 
though by no means an elder in years, did what one reso- 
lute man could do to defeat the ambition of Richelieu and to 
give us a New England instead of a New France between 
the Hudson and the Bay of Fundy and, having accomplished 
this, died full of honors if not of years in 1641. Hum- 
phrey, the son who came with him from Somerset on his 
return in 1628, lived long and well and dying forty years 
later left behind him a numerous and worthy progeny, 
losing a son with the "Flower of Essex" at Bloody Brook, 
in 1675, and another dying in 1690, on his way home 
from "Phips's wild crusade against Quebec." Peter, 
another son of the Old Planter, born just before his fath- 
er's death, left many and w T ell-known descendants and 
was the Deacon Peter and Sergeant Peter of the town and 
parish records. For the rest there have been thrifty far- 
mers among them, hardy fishermen, shrewd and fearless 
captains of trading craft, ingenious mechanics and inven- 
tors, successful master-builders, estimable doctors and 
clergymen, public-spirited citizens, honest neighbors. 



40 NOTES ON THE 

Some have spun out at home the quiet, uneventful life of 
the New England Deacon ; others have died abroad, by 
flood and field on every sea and shore. "Taken by the 
French while fishing," — "Lost with seven men and two 
boys at sea," — " Died in captivity," — "Missing abroad for 
a long while," — "Lost on a home voyage from the West 
Indies," — or the "Carolinas" — "Died from wounds on 
board H. M. King George's Frigate Apollo," — "Fell 
overboard and drowned in the waters of Virginia by the 
breaking of a thole-pin while rowing in James River," — 
"Died in the French and Indian War," — "Killed at Can- 
ton, China," — "Died on passage from Coast of Africa," — 
"Lost in the Bay, " — " Washed overboard from Ship Co- 
lumbia on homeward passage from Liverpool" — "Died in 
Mill Prison," — 33 such are some of the sadly suggestive 
epitaphs to be read by scores in the short and simple an- 
nals of this stalwart, coast-reared stock. Few "enterprises 
of great pith and moment" were set on foot in the colony 
except a Woodbury was of the party, and they seem to 
have been ready early and late, whether in humble or 
conspicuous station and whatever might betide, to bear a 
man's part. Two Beverly Woodburys piloted the little 
fleet to the capture of St. John's and Port Royal in the 
New England Expedition of 1654. And a full century 
later a Beverly Woodbury stood by the side of Wolfe as 
he fell in victory upon the plains of Abraham, and wore 
that day a sword which is still an heirloom with his 



88 It is recorded of "Madame Andrew" Woodbury that yellow fever destroyed 
her husband and four children in a lew weeks in 1757, and her negro man and two 
negro infants in 1762. The "Widow Mary" Woodbury's "Negro man Cuff" had 
died in 17(31 and in 1769 she sold her ten years old "negro boy Fortius" to Mr. 
BarUet for forty pounds. Robert Mingo, a negro slave from whom Mingo Beach 
is thought to have taken its name, was in 1707 the property of Thomas Woodbury 
of Beverly. The number of slaves in Beverly in 1754 was but twenty-eight, so the 
Woodburys seem to have had a partiality for that sort of chattel movable. 



ANCIENT FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 41 

descendants. The man who lost a thumb while at the 
wheel of the Frigate "Constitution" during the first action 
of the War of 1812, in which she captured and destroyed 
H. B. M. Frigate "Guerriere," was a Woodbury of Bev- 
erly. And it was reserved for the Honorable Levi Wood- 
bury of New Hampshire, Jackson's Secretary of the Navy, 
to pen orders which opened to our commerce the ports of 
Siam, brought the weak-headed Bourbon, who was playing 
at kingcraft at the time in Naples, to a sense of his obli- 
gations to our insulted flag, and inspired the craven cut- 
throats of Sumatra, who had just massacred a portion of 
the crew of the "Friendship" of Salem at Qualla Battoo, 
with a salutary terror which made navigation and traffic 
safe from that day on, even in the Indian Archipelago. 
In our intervals of prosperity and peace the name of 
Woodbury has made itself known in poetry, literature 
and music, in mechanics and engineering, in philanthropy 
and religion, in politics and law. In the great civil war, I 
do not know how often it may be traced among those 
serried lines of headstones which guard, on so many a 
well-contested field, the "bivouac of the dead." But I 
find in the historian of the "Burnside Expedition and the 
Ninth Army Corps," and of the First and Second Rhode 
Island Volunteer Regiments, a Beverly Woodbury who 
was actively engaged at Bull Run, in July, 1861, with the 
Rhode Island First, of which, as early as April 18th, he 
had been commissioned chaplain, and another Beverly 
Woodbury in the Sergeant who rose to be commissioned 
by Governor Andrew a Lieutenant Colonel, September 
20, 1864, and in a New Hampshire Woodbury the Major 
General who was engaged as engineer on the defences of 
Washington in 1861-2, who commanded the Engineer 
Brigade before Richmond and Fredericksburg in 1862-3, 

HIST. COLL. XXIV. 3* 



42 ANCIENT FAMILY OF WOODBURY. 

and who was Chief Engineer of the Department of the 
Gulf for 1863-4. And I find it easy to believe that the 
old blood is as young and lusty yet as it was in that earlier 
age when, seen through the hazy atmosphere of a roman- 
tic past, some Sir Ealph or Sir Eeginald, on his heavy 
Norman charger, comes clattering over the draw-bridge 
of his castle moat, plume and pennant dancing in the 
breeze, his three blood-red, rampant lions freshly blazoned 
on his blue and silver shield, the crimson rose of Lancas- 
ter blushing at his belt, and his doughty retainers, each in 
complete steel, all marshalled at his back. 



EARLY SETTLERS OE ROWLEY, MASS., INCLUDING 

ALL WHO WERE HERE BEFORE 1662. 

WITH A EEW GENERATIONS OE THEIR DESCENDANTS. 



BY GEO. B. BLODGETTE, M.A. 



[Continued from page 309, Vol. XXIII.] 

TENNEY. 

108 Thomas Tenney , brother of Deacon William 109 , 
had an acre and a half house-lot, 1643. He brought with 
him wife Ann, who was mentioned as " sister" in the will 
of Dea. Thomas Mighill 70 . She was buried 26-7mo., 
1657. He married (2) 24 Feb., 1657-8, Elizabeth, 
widow of Francis Parrat 79 . 

He was styled " ensign" and died in Bradford, 20 Feb., 
1699-700. 

Children by wife Ann : 

108-1 John 2 , b. 14-10mo., 1640; m. Mercy Parrat 79 " 4 - 

108-2 Hannah 2 , b. 15-lmo., 1642; m. (before 1667) Joseph Johnson 

of Haverhill. 
108-3 Mary 2 , b. 17-4mo., 1644; m. 22 Nov., 1664, Thomas Hardy of 

Bradford. 
108-4 Thomas 2 , b. 16-5mo., 1648; m. Margaret Hidden 45 " 3 - 
108-5 James 2 , b. 15-6mo., 1650; m. Abigail Lambert 62 " 8 - 
108-6 Daniel 2 , b. 16-5mo., 1653; m. Elizabeth Stickney. 

108-1 John Tenney (Thomas m ) born 14-10mo., 
1640; married 26 Feb., 1663-4, Mercy, daughter of 
Francis Parrat 79 . She died 27 Nov., 1667. He married 
(2) in Merrimac Village, 2 Dec, 1668, Susannah Wood- 
bury of Beverly. She died in Bradford, 9 April, 1716, 
in her 68 year (gravestone) (see will of her mother Eliz- 
abeth Woodbury, Hist. Coll., Vol. IV, p. 235). 

(43) 



44 EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 

He bought land in Bradford, 1664. He then styled 
himself of "Kowley;" he was of Bradford, 1669. 
Children, by wife Mercy, born in Rowley : 

108-7 Sarah 3 , b. 17-8mo., 1665; m. in Bradford, 23 July, 1684, Capt. 
Philip Atwood of Bradford. She died 2 April, 1739, in he', 
74th year (gravestone in Bradford). He died 13 April, 172j, 
in his 64th year (gravestone in Bradford). 

108-8 Samuel 3 , b. 20 Nov., 1667; lived for a time with his great uncle 
William 109 . He settled in Bradford and was deacon of the 

church there. He m. , Abigail, dau. of Deacon Joseph 

Bailey. She died in Bradford, 28 Nov., 1689. He m. 2nd, in 
Bradford, 18 Dec, 1690, Sarah Boynton 12 ' 9 . She died 3 April, 

1709, in her 38th year (gravestone in B.). He m. 3rd, , 

Hannah . 

The history of the First Church in Bradford, recently pub- 
lished, speaks of him as a man long remembered for the pe- 
culiar sweetness of his Christian character. He was a fine 
singer and led the service of song for twenty-five years. His 
house stood near where T. H. Finney now (1886) resides and 
there he died Feb. 3, 1748, in the 81st year of his age. 

108-4 Thomas Tenney (Thomas 108 ) born 16-5mo., 
1648 ; married 8 Sept., 1680, Margaret, daughter of An- 
drew Hidden 45 . I find no mention of her death. 

He died 7 Aug., 1730, "an old man" (Chh. JR.). 

Children : 

108-9 Margaret 3 , bapt. 13 Nov., 1681; m. 30 Dec, 1701, Jacob Bar- 
ker 6 - 21 . 

108-10 Ann 3 , b. 26 Aug., 1683; m. 23 Oct., 1704, Aquilla Jewett 54 21 - 

108-11 Sarah 3 , bapt. 24 May, 1685; m. 17 Dec, 1705, Thomas Ten- 
ney 108 - 24 . 

108-12 Elizabeth 3 , b. 23 April, 1687; m. 23 May, 1710, John Sawyer 93 " 9 - 

108-13 Hannah 3 , b. 27 Jan., 1689-90; (probably m. Jeremiah Ells- 
worth 33 3 ). 

108-14 Samuel 3 , b. 21 Aug., 1692; m. (about 1712), Ann Cressey. She 
died 22 Dec, 1717. He m. 2nd, 18 Dec, 1718, Sarah Duty. 
He died 6 Feb., 1746-7, "suddenly" (Chh. R.). 

108-15 Ruth 3 , b. 26 Feb., 1694-5; m. 1 Oct., 1718, Samuel Duty. 

108-16 Mehitable 3 , b. 29 July, 1699; m. 5 Feb., 1722-3, Jonathan 
Shepherd. 



EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 45 

108-5 James Tenney (Thomas 108 ) born 15-6mo., 
1650; married 3 Oct., 1684, Abigail, daughter of John 
Lambert 62 " 1 . She died in Byfield Parish, 3 March, 1756, 
* aged ab* 90 years" (Byfield Chh. R. ) . He died . 

Children : 

108-17 James 3 ,„bapt. 2 Aug., 1685. 

108-18 Abigail 3 , b. 12 Dec, 1688; ra. in Newbury, 31 Aug., 1715, Rob- 
ert Cole of " Great Brittain." 

108-19 John 3 , b. 6 April, 1692; d. in Byfield Parish, 29 Jan., 1772, in 
his 80th year. 

108-20 Hannah 3 , b. 4 April, 1695; m. in Newbury, 1 Dec, 1717, Nich- 
olas Cheney of Newbury. 

108-21 Gershom 3 , b. 19 May, 1698. 

108-22 Benjamin 3 , b. 26 Jan., 1703-4. 

108-23 Philip 3 , b. 25 Nov., 1706. 



108-6 Daniel Tenney (Thomas m ) born 16-5mo., 
1653 ; married 21 July, 1680, Elizabeth, daughter of 
Lieut. Samuel Stickney (see Stickney Family, p. 443). 

She died 12 June, 1694. He married (2) , Mary 

. He may have been the Daniel Tenney whose 

intention of marriage with Elizabeth Woodman was pub- 
lished 27 May, 1712, and she may have been the widow 
Elizabeth Tenney who died 5 Sept., 1749, "over 80." I 
suppose his home was in Byfield Parish, Rowley, and that 
he died there. I have not been able to determine much 
concerning the family of Thomas 108 or any of his descend- 
ants. 

Children, by first wife, born in Bradford : 

108-24 Thomas 3 , b. 28 May, 1681; ra. 17 Dec, 

ney 108 " 11 . 
108-25 Daniel 3 , b. 8 June, 1684; d. 2 Dec, 1689. 
108-26 Sarah 3 , b. 28 Nov., 1687. 
108-27 Daniel 3 , b. 2 March, 1689-90. 



46 EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 

Children by second wife, born in Rowley : 

108-28 John 3 , b. 14 Oct., 1696. 

108-29 William 3 , b. 23 Oct., 1698; m. , Mehitable Pearson 80 " 49 . 

She died 1 March, 1774, "almost 79" (Byfield Chh. R.). He 

died . 

108-30 Richard 3 , b. 3 April, 1701. 
108-31 Ebenezer 3 , b. 12 Aug., 1703. 
108-32 Mary 3 , b. 24 Oct., 1705. 

109 Deacon William Tenney, brother of Thom- 
as 108 , had an acre and a half house-lot in the second divis- 
ion lying between the lots of Mark Prime on the north 
and Thomas Miller on the south, with the east end on the 
street. He was ordained Deacon of our church 3 Feb., 
1667-8. His wife was Katherine. He died 5 Aug., 
1685 (see inventory). His will, dated 3 Aug., 1685, 
mentions : wife (unnamed) and four daughters, Elizabeth, 
Mary, and Ruth as married, Sarah as unmarried, also 
nephew Samuel Tenney to have £20 if he " stay with his 
aunt till he arrives at the age of 21 years" (Essex Probate) . 

10 May, 1698, widow Katherine Tenney, then of Brad- 
ford, sold to James Bailey and Samuel Prime the house- 
lot in Rowley, where her late husband formerly dwelt, of 
about one and a half acres bounded "on ye East end on ye 
Town Street, on ye North side on land of ye said Prime, 
on ye West on ye brooke that runs through ye town and 
on ye South on land of Mr. Woodman" (Essex Deeds 
12 : 118). Widow Katherine died in Bradford, 13 Oct., 
1700. 

Children : 

109-1 Elizabeth 2 , b. 9-2mo., 1643; m. , Woodbury of 

Beverly. 
109-2 Mary 2 , b. 24-7mo., 1646; m. , Thomas West of Bradford. 

He died 23 Dec, 1720, in his 90th year (gravestone in B.). 

She died 12 May, 1731, in her 85th year (gravestone in B.). 

An interesting mention of her appears in our Church Record. 






EAKLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 47 



109-3 Samuel 2 , b. 6-2mo., 1650; buried 5 Aug., 1660. 

109-4 Sarah 2 , b. 15-2mo., 1652; buried 10 April, 1653. 

109-5 Ruth 2 , b. 16 March, 1653-4; m. in Bradford, 3 May, 1678, Wil- 
liam Hardy of Bradford. 

109-6 Sarah 2 , b. 20-7mo., 1656; m. 22 July, 1687, John West, prob. 
of Bradford, but of Ipswich, 22 Feb., 1691-2 (Essex Deeds, 
5Ips.,535). 



THORLEY. 

110 Richard Thorley had a two acre house-lot, 1643, 
He sold his property in Rowley to Capt. John Johnson 5 
and was of Newbury, 1651, with his wife Jane. 

(This name is now written " Thurlow") . 

Children born here : 

110-1 Lydia 2 , b. l-2mo., 1640. 
110-2 John 2 , b. 19-5mo., 1644. 

He had other children, among them : 
110-3 Martha 2 , who m. 27 Nov., 1662, Lieut. John Dresser 30 - 1 * 



TILLISON. 

Ill John Tillison had an acre and a half house-lot in 
the second division about 1645. He soon removed to 
Newbury and was there 1655. It is doubtful if he actu- 
ally resided here. 



TODD. 

112 John Todd, not of the first, but was here very 
early, probably 1648. He brought with him his wife Su- 
sannah. Her maiden name may have been Hunt. She 
is mentioned as "sister" in the will of Mary, wife of John 
Grant 35 " 1 . Ann, wife of Thomas Wood 116 , is also men- 



48 EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 

tioned as "sister." They are both mentioned as being 
about 60 years old in 1697 (see affidavit on file with will 
of Mary Grant in Essex Probate) . John Todd kept the 
"Ordinary" (Book of Grants, 37). 

He died 14 Feb., 1689-90. His will, dated 13 Feb., 
1689-90, proved 25 March, 1690, mentions : wife (un- 
named) ; sons John, Timothy, Samuel and James ; daugh- 
ters Mehitable, Euth and Mary who have had their por- 
tion ; also "Brother hunt" (Essex Probate 3 : 227). His 
widow Susannah died 18 Nov., 1710 (see Thomas 
Wood 116 ). 

Children : 



112-1 Mehitable 2 , b. 10-llmo., 1649 m. 1 . 

112-2 John 2 , b. — 12mo., 1655; buried —12 mo., 1655. 

112-3 Ruth 2 , b. ll-2mo., 1657; m. in Ipswich, 1 May, 1678, Samuel 
Hunt of Ipswich. 

112-4 Mary 2 , b. 10 June, 1659; m. . 

112-5 John 2 , b. — , 1661; m. Elizabeth Brocklebank 16 " 7 . 

112-6 Susannah 2 , b. 5 Sept., 1664; buried 15 Nov., 1664. 

112-7 Thomas 2 , b. 3-10mo., 1665 ; not mentioned in father's will; prob- 
ably died without issue ; was the widow Rachel Todd who m. 
in Ipswich, 15-8mo., 1684, Joseph Goodhue, a widower, the 
widow of this Thomas? 

112-8 Timothy 2 , b. 2 May, 1668; was in the Canada Expedition, 1690; 
probably died there and "without wife or child, as I find re- 
ceipts of his brothers for their shares of his estate (see Es- 
sex Deeds 66: 92). 

112-9 Samuel 2 , b. 9 July, 1670; m. widow Priscilla Bradstreet. 

112-10 James 2 , b. 8 Feb., 1671-2; m. Mary Hopkinson 49 ' 8 . 

112-5 John Todd {John 11 ' 2 ) born , 1661 ; mar- 
ried 14 March, 1684-5, Elizabeth, daughter of Capt. 
Samuel Brocklebank 16-1 . She died 5 April, 1725, in her 
64th year (gravestone). He married (2; 12 July, 1725, 
Jemima, widow of William Bennett and daughter of Capt. 
Philip Nelson 73 " 1 . He died 21 Feb., 1740-1. 

1 Goodman Center was son-in-law of John Todd before 1G87 (Chu. R.). 



EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 49 

His widow Jemima married (3) 21 Dec, 1742, Ebene- 
zer Parsons of Gloucester, and died in Gloucester, 25 
April, 1752, in her 66th year (Gloucester Record). 

Children by wife Elizabeth : 

112-11 Haunah 3 , b. 12 Jan., 1685-6; m. 16 March, 1708-1), John Dole. 

112-12 John 3 , b. 16 April, 1688 ; ra. Ruth Lunt. 

112-13 Elizabeth 3 , b. 15 Sept., 1690; m. (pub. 19 May), 1711, Nath'l 

Donnell of Boston. 
112-14 Samuel 3 , b. 9 May, 1693; m. Lydia Coffin. 
112-15 Mary 3 , b. 21 Sept., 1696; m. 4 April, 1715, Joshua Jew- 

ett 55 " 37 . 
112-16 Thomas 3 , b. 29 April, 1699; d. 11 Jan., 1700-1. 
112-17 Thomas 3 , b. 18 Aug., 1701. 
112-18 Joseph 3 , b. 26 Oct., 1704; m. Ann Toppen. 

Children by wife Jemima : 

112-19 Joshua 3 , bapt. 18 Sept., 1726. 

112-20 Jane 3 , bapt. 2 Feb., 1728-9; d. 7 April, 1734. 

112-9 Samuel Todd {John 112 ) born 9 July, 1670 ; 
married 26 April, 1694, Priscilla (Carrell) Bradstreet, 
widow of Nathaniel. She died 25 May, 1725, in her 63rd 
year (gravestone). He married (2), published in Ips- 
wich, 11 Dec, 1725, Sarah Newman of Ipswich. 

He died 20 Nov., 1743. His will, dated 24 Jan., 1742, 
proved 5 Dec, 1743, mentions: wife Sarah ; daughter 
Susannah, wife of John Johnson ; son Daniel to whom 
most of the estate is given and who is named executor 
(Essex Probate 25: 178). His widow Sarah died 1 
Sept., 1758 "in her 81 year" (Chh. R.). 

Children : 

112-21 Samuel 3 , b. 2 June, 1696; d. 6 Feb., 1741-2; unm. His will, 
dated 14 Sept., 1741, proved 15 March, 1741-2, mentions: 
brother Daniel Todd, sister Mary, wife of Daniel, and nephew 
William, son of Daniel (Essex Probate 25 : 6). Value of es-. 
tate £835.00. 

HI8T. COLL. XXIV 4 



50 EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 



112-22 Abner 3 , b. 12 July, 1700; m. Abigail . 

112-23 Susannah 3 , b. 25 Sept., 1702; m. 7 June, 1726, John John- 
son 59 " 6 . 
112-21 Daniel 3 , b. 20 June, 1706; m. Mary Newman. 
112-25 Priscilla 3 , bapt. 20 June, 1708; d. 27 June, 1708. 

112-10 James Todd (John 112 ) born 8 Feb., 1671-2 ; 
married 22 June, 1699, Mary, daughter of Jonathan Hop- 
kinson 49 ' 2 . She died 10 Nov., 1749, in her 81st year 
(gravestone). Her will, dated 20 May, 1741, proved 25 
Dec., 1749, mentions: sons Jonathan and Jeremiah; 
daughters Mary Payson, wife of Eliot ; Hannah Boynton, 
wife of Nathan ; Mehitable Dole, wife of Edmand ; and 
Ester Todd (Essex Probate 29 : 44). 

He died 17 June, 1734, in his 63rd year (gravestone) 
"of the Palsie" (Chh. K.). His will, dated 9 April, 
proved 8 July, 1734, mentions : wife Mary and ehildren 
as below (Essex Probate 21 : 142). 

Children : 

112-26 Mary 3 , b. 15 April, 1700; m. 7 Nov., 1722, Eliot Payson. She 

died 8 Sept., 1758, in her 59th year (gravestone). 
112-27 Esther 3 , ^ twins . b 10 } cl. 26 Oct., 1772, ;iged 71yrs. ; umn. 
112-28 An infant 3 , S Mar ' 170 j_ 2 . > d. 11 March, 1701-2, "unbaptized" 

* '3 (Chh. R.). 
112-29 Jonathan 3 , b. 28 Dec, 1704; m. Hannah . 

112-30 Jeremiah 3 , b. 17 March, 1707-8; m. Joanna Kilborn 60 " 28 . 

112-31 Mehitable 3 , b. 3 Aug., 1711; m. 12 Sept., 1735, Edmand Dole. 
She died 24 July, 1779, aged 68 years. 

112-32 Hannah 3 , b. 23 May, 1714; m. 10 Aug., 1738, Nathan Boyn- 
ton 12 " 53 . 

112-12 John Todd (John 11 ™, John m ) born 16 April, 
1688; married 23 Feb., 1715-6, Ruth Lunt. She died 
19 Sept., 1732. He married (2) in Ipswich, 16 Feb., 
1734, Abigail (Perley) Jewett, widow of Aaron Jew- 
ett 50 " 42 . She died 1 Sept., 1768. His intention of mar- 
riage with widow Mary Warner of Ipswich was published 
7 Jan., 1769. 



EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 51 

He died 18 Sept., 1770, "by a fall down stairs, set. 83" 
(Ckh. R.). His will > dated 1( > May, 1766 > proved 30 
Oct., 1770, mentions: wife Abigail; daughters Ruth 
Jewett, Mary Palmer and Elizabeth Pearson ; sons John, 
Thomas, Daniel who is given one-half real estate, and 
Samuel and Benjamin have the other half; son Daniel ex- 
ecutor (Essex Probate 46 : 185). 

Children, by wife Ruth : 

112-33 John 4 , b. 27 Feb., 1716-7; m. 11 Jan., 1741-2, Abigail dan. of 
Samuel and Ruth (Lee) Parsons of Gloucester. She was born 
in Gloucester, 26 July, 1721. 

112-34 Ruth 4 , b. 8 Feb., 1719-20; m. 28 Oct., 1736, Purchase Jew- 
ett 35 27 . 

112-35 Daniel 4 , b. 12 Jan., 1721-2; d. 21 March, 1735-6. 

112-36 Mary 4 , b. 5 Sept., 1723; m. 4 Dec, 1744, Stephen Palmer 78 " 23 . 

112-37 Elizabeth 4 , b. 11 July, 1725; d. 21 June, 1736. 

112-38 Thomas 4 , b. 6 Dec, 1728; m. 22 March, 1753, Susannah Hib- 
bert. She died 9 Aug., 1753. He m. (2) in Bradford, 22 Oct., 
1754, Elizabeth Carlton of Bradford. 

112-39 Ebenezer 4 , C twins; b. 27 C d. 9 Sept., 1731. 



C twins; b. 27 C d. 
I Aug., 1731; id. 






112-40 Infant*, t Aug., 1731; t cl. 27 Aug., 1731 



Children by wife Abigail : 

112-41 Sarah 4 , bapt. 11 Jan., 1735-6; d. 30 April, 1736. 

112-42 Elizabeth 4 , b. 9 May, 1737; m. 10 Dec, 1760, Samuel Pearson. 

112-43 Daniel 4 , b. 11 Oct., 1739; m. 7 Aug., 1770, Jane, dau. of Jona- 
than Pickard 82 - 32 . She died 11 Dec, 1826, aged 86 years. 
He lived in the house now (1887) standing on the corner of 
Central and Bennett streets. He died 30 March, 1824. His 
children were Mary 5 , Jane 5 , Abigail 5 and Daniel 5 . 

112-44 Samuel 4 , b. — Feb. ; bapt. 7 Feb., 1741-2. He served as drum- 
mer in three campaigns in the Revolutionary War and died at 
Albany, Vermont, — June, 1840, aged over 98 years (see 
Gage's Hist. Rowley, p. 282). 

112-45 Benjamin 4 , b. 15 Oct., 1744; m. 15 July, 1773, Elizabeth Saun- 
ders. He was then of Newbury, though soon of Rowley. He 
died 22 July, 1823, aged 79 years. She died 14 July, 1836, 
aged 82 years. His house in Rowley was on the westerly 
corner of Main and Hammond streets. 



52 EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 

112-14 Samuel Todd (John™- 5 , John 112 ) born 9 
May, 1693 ; married in Newbury, 28 March, 1717, Lydia, 
daughter of James Coffin of Newbury. She died 7 Feb., 
1719-20, in her 27th year (gravestone in Rowley). He 
married (2) in Newbury, 21 March, 1722-3, Elizabeth 
Toppen of Newbury. 

His home was in Newbury and he died there. His will, 
dated 3 March, 1740-1, proved 25 May, 1741, mentions : 
son Nathaniel Todd, "whom I had by my first wife, to 
have all that land in the town of Wells in the County of 
York called r Cogs-hall' which land I lately purchased 
of my Brother Richard Toppen ;" wife Elizabeth to be ex- 
ecutrix and have all the estate in Newbury and Rowley, 
etc. ; children Samuel, Moses, Thomas, Elizabeth and 
Sarah (Essex Probate 25 : 4 and 5). Value of estate by 
inventory £2621-18. His widow Elizabeth married in 
Newbury, 20 Oct., 1741, Samuel Bailey of Newbury. 

Children, by wife Lydia, all born in Newbury : 

112-46 Nathaniel 4 , b. 15 April, 1718. 
112-47 Brocklebank 4 , b. 24 Sept., 1719. 

Children by wife Elizabeth : 

112-48 Samuel 4 , b. 19 Jan., 1723; m. in Newbury, 27 Nov., 1747, Eliz- 
abeth Perkins of N. 

112-49 Moses 4 , b. 14 March, 172G; m. in Newbury, 20 Sept., 1744, 
Elizabeth Sweasey of N. He died in Seabrook, 5 Sept., 1796 
(Newburyport Record;. 

112-50 Thomas 4 , b. 31 Oct., 1727. 

112-51 Elizabeth 4 , b. 16 Feb., 1729. 

112-52 Sarah 4 , b. . 

112-18 Doctor Joseph Todd (John 112 - 5 , John 112 ) born 
26 Oct., 1704; married in Newbury, 2 Nov., 1727, Ann 
Toppen of Newbury. She died 17 May, 1732. He 
married (2) 7 May, 1733, Elizabeth, daughter of Ephraim 
Nelson 73 " 24 . 



EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 53 

He died in Bristol, England, , 1744 (Gage). 

His widow Elizabeth married (2) 22 Sept., 1748, John 
White of Wenham (see will of Ephraim Nelson 73-24 ). 

By the return to the Court of Sessions for Essex 
County, 1743, Joseph Todd with his wife Elizabeth and 
children Joseph, Elizabeth and Susanna were warned out 
of Rowley. This is the only record found of these chil- 
dren. 

Child : 

112-53 Nelson 4 , b. 15 Nov., 1744; m. 25 Dec, 1770, Hannah, daughter 
of John Jewett 55 " 60 . She died 8 June, 1778. He in. (2) 8 
Aug., 1780, Hannah Bailey 3 " 47 . . She died 9 July, 1804, aged 51 
years. He died 20 Dec., 1821. 

112-22 Abner Todd (Samuel 1 ' 2 - 9 , John 112 ) born 12 
July, 1700; published 19 Feb., 1723-4, to Elizabeth 
Worcester of Bradford. He married , Abigail . 

He died 21 April, 1737, aged 37 years. His will, 
dated 9 April, 1737, proved 16 May, 1737, mentions : wife 
Abigail who is named executrix, daughters Priscilla and 
Martha (Essex Probate 22: 27). 

His widow Abigail married (2) 11 April, 1738, Dr. 
Philip Fowler of Ipswich, as his third wife. She died in 
Ipswich, 28 Dec, 1783, aged 84 years. 

Children baptized in Byheld Parish : 

112-54 Priscilla 4 , b. 16 Jan., 1724-5; m. 10 May, 1744, Abraham Fos- 
ter (or Fowler) of Ipswich. 

112-55 Martha 4 , bapt. 17 Jan., 1730-1; died soon. 

Baptized in our Second Parish, now Georgetown : 

112-56 Martha 4 , bapt. 29 Oct., 1732; d. 11 Jan., 1737-8, aged 5J. 

112-57 Abner 4 , bapt. 15 Jan., 1737-8; d. 15 Oct., 1749, "by a fall from 
a tree," aged 12. 

112-24 Daniel Todd (Samuel 112 - 9 , John 112 ) born 20 
June, 1706. He married 6 Feb., 1728-9, Mary Newman, 
probably daughter of his father's second wife. She died 
1 Aug.," 1771. 



54 EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 

He died 6 Oct., 1782, aged 76 years. 
Child : 

112-58 William 4 , b. 12 Dec, 1729; m. 24 Jan., 1754, Ednah, dau. of 
Capt. Geo. Jewett 55 " 75 . She died 31 Jan., 1810, aged 80 years. 
He died 8 Dec., 1815, aged 8G years (gravestone). His home 
was the house in Rowley now (1887) owned by Woodbury 
Smith, Esq. His children were: I George*, b. 1 Dec, 1754. 
II Daniel*, b. 17 March, 1757; d. 31 Aug., 1839, aged 82 years 
(gravestone). Ill William*, b. 18 July, 1759. IV Moses*, b, 
22 July, 1761; d. 5 Oct., 1764. V Mary*, b. 15 Sept., 1763. 
VI Elizabeth*, b. 26 Nov., 1765. VII Hannah*, b. 18 Sept., 
1767; d. 1 April, 1774. VIII Ednah*, b. 6 Oct., 1769. IX Mo- 
ses*, b. 2 July, 1772. 

112-29 Jonathan.Todd (James 112 - 10 , John 112 ) born 28 

Dec., 1704; married , Hannah . She died 

21 April, 1774, in her 67th year (gravestone). 

He died 29 March, 1775, in his 71st year (gravestone). 
His will, dated 4 April, 1766, proved 2 April, 1776, men- 
tions : wife Hannah ; sons James ; Asa ; Nathan, who 
has the homestead ; and daughter Mary Todd (Essex Pro- 
bate 51: 267). 

Children : 

112-59 Sarah 4 , b. 16 March, 1729-30; d. 24 March, 1733-4. 

112-60 James 4 , b. 4 May, 1732; ra. 7 Dec, 1756, Ann Sawyer, dau. of 
Ezekiel 9J - 12 . She was born 28 July, 1736 and died 19 Aug., 
1813, aged 77 years. He died 17 June, 1808, aged 76 years. 

112-61 Jonathan 4 , bapt. 27 April, 1735; d. 8 May, 1735. 

112-62 Jonathan 4 , bapt. 18 April, 1736; d. 29 April, 1736. 

112-63 Asa 4 , b. 10 March, 1737-8; m. 30 May, 1765, Elizabeth, second 
dau. of Col. Thomas Gage. She died 23 July, 1776, in her 
34th year (gravestone). He died 14 Nov., 1795, aged 56 (of 
Gloucester). 

112-64 Nathan 4 , bapt. 7 June, 1741; ra. 26 March, 1776, Jane Scott, 
daughter of Joseph 97 " 27 - She died 2 March, 1830. He died 
25 June, 1808, aged 67. His home was at "Kittery," in Row- 
ley, near the house now (1887) owned by Samuel Searle, Esq. 

112-65 Mary 4 , b. 22 April, 1746; m. 8 Sept., 1768, Moses Scott, son of 
Joseph 97 ' 27 , lie died 8 Dec, 1817, aged 75 years. She died 
30 Aug., 1828, aged 84 years. 

112-66 William 4 , bapt. 24 May, 1752; d. 26 May, 1752. 



EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 55 

112-30 Jeremiah Todd (James 112 - 10 , John 112 ) born 
17 March, 1707-8; married 27 Sept., 1739, Joanna, 
daughter of Joseph Kilborn 60 " 9 . She was born 7 Dee., 
1717, and died 10 May, 1807, aged 89 years. 

He died . 

Children : 

112-67 Eben 4 , bapt. 14 Dec, 1740; d. 25 Dec, 1740. 

112-68 David 4 , b. 7 Oct., 1742; m. (pub. 21 Sept.) 1765, Sarah Has- 
kell of Ipswich. He died 15 July, 1811, aged 69 years. She 
died 12 April, 1825, aged 79 years. His home was the farm 
in Rowley now (1887) owned by Samuel Searle, Esq. 

112-69 Jeremiah 4 , b. 27 Nov., 1745. 

112-70 Eben 4 , b. 2 Sept., 1748; in. in Ipswich, 9 Oct., 1781, Huldah, 
dau. of Sampson Kilborn 60 " 54 . She died 28 Feb., 1787, "in 
child bed." He died 20 June, 1786, "aged 39 years." 

112-71 Joanna 4 b. 10 Oct., 1750; m. (pub. 14 Nov., 1787) Purchase 
Jewett of Ipswich. She died 9 Dec, 1825, aged 82 (?). 

112-72 Jonathan 4 , b. 4 March, 1752; m. (pub. 7 Aug.) 1778, Sarah 
Pickard. She died — June, 1838, aged 84 years. He died 2 
Dec, 1801, aged 49 years. 

112-73 Joseph 4 , "| f m. 4 Nov., 1779, Mercy Smith. He 

! f^r^o k 07 I lived in the house on Central St. 
i twins ; \). si i 

' April 1754-^ lately owned by Wm. Moody. He 

' j died 6 Aug., 1838, a^ed 84 years. 

112-74 An infant 4 , J Id. 27 April, 1754. 



TRUMBLE. 

113 John Trumble, freeman 13-3mo., 1640, had an 
acre and a half house-lot, 1643 ; succeeded Francis Par- 
rat 79 as Town Clerk, 1655, and so continued until his 
death. ^ He brought with him wife Ellen who died before 
1650. " 

He married (2) — 6mo., 1650, Ann, widow of Michael 
Hopkinson 40 . He was buried 18-5mo., 1657. His fam- 
ily received pay after his decease for his " keepeing of a 
scoolle". 



56 EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 

• His widow Ann married (3) 1 March, 1658-9, Richard 
Swan 107 . 

Children by wife Ellen : 

113-1 John 2 , b. about 1639; m. Deborah Jackson 61 " 4 . 

113-2 Hannah 2 , b. 14-12mo., 1640. 

113-3 Juclah 2 , b. 3-4mo., 1643; removed to Conn, and there raised up 
a large family (see Savage's Gen. Diet., Vol. IV, p. 337). 

113-4 Ruth 2 , b. 23-2mo., 1645; m. 15 July, 1664, Samuel Perley of Ips- 
wich. 

113-5 Joseph 2 , b. 19-3mo., 1647; m. Hannah Smith 100 " 4 . 

Children by wife Ann : 

113-6 Abigail 2 , b. 10-10mo., 1651; m. , Deacon Joseph Bailey of 

Bradford. He was only son of Richard 4 and he died in Brad- 
ford, 11 Oct., 1712. She died in Bradford, 17 Nov., 1735. 

113-7 Mary 2 , b. 17-4mo., 1654; m. 30 May, 1678, Joseph Kilborn 60 ' 2 . 

113-1 Deacon John Trumble (John 113 ) born prob- 
ably in Roxbury about 1639 ; married 14 May, 1662, 
Deborah, daughter of William Jackson 51 ; was ordained 
Deacon of our church 24 Oct., 1686, and was Lieutenant 
of the military company, 1689. He died — March, 
1690-1. The inventory of his estate was taken 20 Mar., 
1690-1, and his widow Deborah was appointed adminis- 
tratrix, 22 April, 1691. She died 20 Nov., 1709. 

Children : 

113-8 John 3 , b. 3-12mo., 1666; buried 26 July, 1667. 
113-9 Deborah 3 , bapt. 2 July, 1671; died soon. 

113-10 Mary 3 , b. 13 March, 1673-4; m. 18 Jan., 1697-8, John Nel- 
son 73 " 7 . 
113-11 Judah 3 , b. 30 July, 1676; m. Elizabeth Acy 2 " 7 . 
113-12 Deborah 3 , bapt. 10 June, 1683; d. 5 June, 1704. 

113-5 Joseph Trumble (John m ) born 19-3mo., 
1647 ; married 6 May, 1669, Hannah, daughter of Hugh 
Smith 100 . J 

He sold his homestead to Daniel Wicom, 4 June, 1675 1 



EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 57 

(Essex Deeds, 5 Ips., 154), and soon removed with his 
family to Connecticut. He was dismissed from our church 
24 May, 1680, to the "Church of Christ at Springfield" 
and died before 1687. It was his widow Hannah who 
married John Strong, not his daughter, as shown by the 
following extract from our Church Record : " Hannah 
Strong sometime the wife of Joseph Trumbl, & daughter 
to Br Smith now wife of Goodm : Strong dismissed to 
the Church of Xst at Winsor Novemb 1 1687." 
Children born here: 

113-13 John 3 , bapt. 27 Nov., 1670. 
113-14 Hannah 3 , b. 9 May, 1673. 
113-15 Mary 3 , bapt. 28 March, 1675. 

He had others born in Connecticut. 



113-11 Judah Trumble {Deacon John 11 *' 1 , John 113 ) 
born 30 July, 1676. rfe married 11 Nov., 1698, Eliza- 
beth, daughter of John Acy 2-2 . She died . He 

married (2) 2 , Judith . She died in Ips- 
wich, 19 June, 1749 (Ips. Eec). 10 May, 1714, the 
town voted Judah Trumble overseer of the poor ; 7s. per 
week for keeping John Jackson (Book No. 1 : 90). 

He, then of Rowley, was a witness to the will of John 
Dresser, 22 Jan., 1735 (Essex Probate 22 : 1). 

He died in Ipswich, 29 Sept., 1751 (Ips. Eec). 

Children : 

113-16 Mary 4 ,b. 23 March, 1700-1; m. 15 Dec, 1726, Joseph Goodhue, 
junior, of Ipswich. 

113-17 Hannah 4 , b. 20 Dec, 1705; m. 20 Jan., 1725-6, Daniel John- 
son 59 " 8 . 



2 See Haverhill Records for marriage of a Judah Trumbull to Grace Foster, 18 
Jan., 1732-3. They had a child Mary, born 1 Sept., 1735; died 29 July, 1736. It may 
have been Judah 1 "- 11 . 

HIST. COLL. XXIV 4* 



58 EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 



WICOM. 



114 Richard Wicom had an acre and a half house-lot 
1643. In 1661, he gave all his estate to his son John in 
consideration of support of self and his wife Ann during 
life ; in the deed he mentions his son Daniel as having re- 
ceived enough already (Essex Deeds ). 

He was buried 27 Jan., 1663-4. His widow Ann was I 
buried 25 Aug., 1674. 

(Called Richard Nalam in Gage's Hist., p. 130). 

Children : 

114-1 Daniel 2 , b. in Eng. (about) 1635; m. Mary Smith 100 ' 2 . 

114-2 Thomas 2 , b. ; buried 6 July, 1660. 

114-3 John 2 , b. (about 1647) ; m. Abigail Kimball. 

114-1 Capt. Daniel Wicom (Richard 11 *) born in j 
Eng., 1635; married 14 Oct.,' 1658, Mary, daughter of I 
Hugh Smith 100 . She died 29 Jan., 1690-1. He married j 
(2) 11 Nov., 1691, Lydia, widow of Lieut. Abel Plats 83 " 2 
and daughter of James Bailey 3 . She died 24 Nov., 1722, j 
aged 80 years (gravestone). He was a carpenter, and I 
captain of the military company. He died 15 April, j 
1700, aged 65 years (gravestone). In the division of his I 
estate the court assigned one-third to widow Lydia, the j 
remainder to only son Daniel, he to pay his three sisters, ] 
Frances Johnson, Rebecca and Martha Wicom, etc. (Es- j 
sex Probate 7 : 14 and 54 and 55). 

Children, all by wife Mary : 

114-4 Mary 3 , b. ; buried 1 Feb., 1660-1. 

114-5 Sarah 3 , b. 27 Dec, 1661; died before 1700 without issue. 

114-6 Daniel 3 , b. ; m. Sarah Hazen. 

114-7 Mary 3 , b. 11 Nov., 1667; died before 1700 without issue. 
114-8 Thomas 3 , bapt. 14 July, 1672; died before 1700 without issue. 



EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 59 

114-9 Frances 3 , b. 29 March, 1675; m. 31 May, 1694, Samuel John- 
son 59 * 5 . 

114-10 Rebecca, 3 b. 7 Dec, 1677; unmarried 1700. 

114-11 Martha 3 , b. 6 March, 1679-80; m. 15 Jan., 1701-2, Daniel Hardy 
of Bradford. 

114-12 Hannah 3 , b. ; cl. 24 Feb., 1689-90. 

114-3 John Wicom (Richard m ) born about 1647 ; 
married 14 May, 1673, Abigail Kimball. 

He was of Newbury 5 Sept., 1702 (Essex Deeds, 4 
Norfolk, 70). He died 1 April, 1715, aged 68 years 
(gravestone in Byfield Parish) . 

Children : 

114-13 Ann 3 , b. 1 April, 1674. 

114-14 Abigail 3 , b. 10 March, 1675-6; m. 2 Dec, 1702, Richard 
Clark 22 " 5 . 

114-15 John 3 , b. 28 Nov., 1677; buried 12 June, 1679. 

114-16 Mary 3 , bapt. 18 Jan., 1679-80; m. 24 Jan., 1699-700, Jonathan 
Jewett 54 ' 20 . 

114-17 Mehitable 3 , b. 5 Sept., 1682; m. (pub. 26 May) 1703, Joshua 
Woodman, Jan., of Newbury. 

114-18 Sarah 3 , b. 29 Aug., 1688; m. in Newbury, 15 Nov., 1715, Zach- 
ary Boynton 11 ' 10 . 

114-19 Thomas 3 , b. 6 May, 1692; m. in Newbury, 16 Jan., 1718-9, 
Hannah Hale. He m., 2nd, in Newbury, 1 April, 1728, Ann 
Bailey 3 " 28 . They lived in Newbury. His estate was divided 
3 April, 1731; widow Ann, son William 4 , daughters Hannah 4 , 
Anna 4 and Sarah 4 each received a portion (Essex Probate 19 : 
132). His widow Ann m. , Daniel Tenney. 

114-6 Daniel Wicom ( Oqpt. Daniel 114 ' 1 , Richard 114 ) 
born . He married 27 June, 1690, Sarah, daugh- 
ter of Edward and Hannah (Grant 35 " 2 ) Hazen 44 . She was 
born 22 Aug., 1673, and died 9 April, 1706, "in her 33 rd 
year" (gravestone). He married (2) , Jane . 

17 Feb., 1712, he conveys land in Rowley to his son- 
in-law James Barker, who is to pay £3 each to Daniel's 
fivc3 daughters, viz. : Mary, Hannah, Hephzibah, Elizabeth 
and Priscilla (Essex Deeds, 4 Norfolk: 33). 



60 EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 

Children by wife Sarah : 

114-20 Mary 4 , b. 4 June, 1691; died soon. 

114-21 Sarah 4 , b. 27 June, 1694; m. 7 May, 1711, James Barker " 25 . 

114-22 Mary 4 , b. 15 Jan., 1696-7; m. 3 July, 1719, James Jarvis of 

Newbury. She died 30 April, 1726. 
114-23 Hannah 4 , bapt. 12 March, 1698-9; m. 5 Aug., 1718, Jonathan 

Crosby of " Oyster River." 
114-24 Hephzibah 4 , b. 22 April, 1701; m. 17 April, 1722, Amos Stick- 

ney (Stickney Genealogy). 
114-25 Elizabeth 4 , bapt. 19 Dec., 1703. 
114-26 Priscilla 4 (Hannah on Town Record), b. 9 April, 1706; m. in 

Boxford, 19 Oct., 1724, Nathaniel Danforth (County Rec). 

Child by wife Jane : 
114-27 Daniel 4 , b. 22 April, 1712; d. 25 June, 1713. 

WILD. 

115 William Wild, "carpenter," had an acre and a 
half house-lot 1643. He was first of Ipswich and again of 
Ipswich, 1661, and probably much earlier. 



WOOD. 

115 Thomas Wood married 7-4mo., 1654, Ann 
(see John Todd 112 ). 



She died 29 Dec, 1714. He was buried 12 Sept., 
1687. He was about 40 years old 1675, and called John 
Todd "l)rothcr" (C. C, Vol. 23 : 27-8-9). 

Children : 

11G-1 Mary 2 , b. 15-lmo., 1G55. ;*. 

11G-2 John 2 , b. 2-9mo., 1G5G; m. Isabel Ilazcn. 

116-8 Thomas 2 , b. 10 Aug., 1G58; m. Mary Hunt. 

11G-4 Ann 2 , b. 8 Aug., 1GG0; in. 15 Jan., 1078-9, Benjamin Plummer 

(called " Mary" in record ol marriages, but " Ann" was the 

mother of his children). 



EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 61 

116-5 Kuth 2 , b. 21-5mo., 1662; m. 16 Jan., 1680-1, Capt. Joseph Jew- 

ett 55 * 8 . 
116-6 Josiah 2 , > twins; b. 5 < m. Sarah Elithorp 3 *" 11 . 
116-7 Elizabeth, 2 S Sept., 1664; X did she m. Capt. Joseph Boynton? 
116-8 Samuel 2 , b. 26 Dec., 1666; m. Margaret Elithorp 32 " 8 . 
116-9 Solomon 2 , b. 17 May, 1669; m. 15 Oct., 1690, Mary Haseltine. 

They settled in Bradford and had children born there. 
116-10 Ebenezer 2 , b. 29 Dec, 1671; m. Rachel Nicholls. 
116-11 James 2 , b. 22 June, 1674; d. 18 Oct., 1694. 



116-2 John Wood {Thomas 116 ) born 2-9mo., 1656; 
married 16 Jan., 1680, Isabel, daughter of Edward Ha- 
zen 44 . 

He was of " ye village" (now Boxford) 20 June, 1680, 
and of Bradford, 13 Feb., 1683-4. 

Children (first four baptized in our church). 

116-12 John 3 , bapt. 20 June, 1680; died soon. 

116-13 Hannah 3 , b. 20 Jan., 1681-2; m. in Bradford, 14 July, 1702, 
James Bailey 3 " 13 . 



Born in Bradford : 

116-14 John 3 , b. 13 Feb., 1683-4. 

116-15 Priscilla 3 , b. 27 Aug., 1686. 

116-16 Edward 3 , b. 7 Sept., 1689; m. in Newbury, 23 Dec, 1713, Mary 

Spofford of Eowley. He was then of Bradford. 
116-17 Thomas 3 , b. 28 Nov., 1691. 
116-18 Samuel 3 , b. 18 Nov., 1693. 
116-19 Joseph 3 , b. 5 May, 1696. 
116-20 Ebenezer 3 , b. 8 Sept., 1698. 
116-21 Bethiah 3 , b. 19 Jan., 1702-3. 
116-22 Richard 3 , b. 30 Jan., 1705-6. 

116-3 Thomas Wood (Thomas 116 ) born 10 Aug., 
1658; m. 6 June, 1683, Mary Hunt. 

He was buried 1 Dec, 1702. His estate was divided 
25 May, 1713 ; all his children except Nehemiah were 
then living (Essex Probate). 

In our church record is the following: " Sept r 18 1726 
Mary Davis formerly ye Relict of Tho. Wood dismissed 
to ye chh. in Mansfield." 



62 EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 

Children : 
116-23 Mary 3 , b. 29 Aug., 1684; m. 16 July, 1701, James Dickin- 



son 



29-12 



116-24 Thomas 3 , b. 28 Sept., 1686. 

116-25 Nehemiah 3 , b. 14 July, 1688; cl. 4 Aug., 1688. 

116-26 Ephraim 3 , b. 13 Oct., 1689; was of Concord, Mass., 26 June, 

1713 (Essex Probate 11 : 15). 
116-27 Samuel 3 , b. 31 May, 1692. 
116-28 Elizabeth 3 , b. 8 April, 1694. 
116-29 Mehitable 3 , b. 18 Dec, 1695. 
116-30 Ann 3 , b. 11 April, 1700. 
116-31 Hannah 3 , b. 21 May, 1703. 

116-6 Josiah Wood 3 {Thomas m ) born 5 Sept., 1664 ; 
married 5 March, 1685, Sarah Elithorp 32 " 11 . She died 9 
Jan., 1688-9. He married (2) 17 Oct., 1689, Mary 
Felt. 

They were dismissed 15 Jan., 1710-1, from our church 
to Concord. 

Child by wife Sarah : 
116-32 Joseph 3 , bapt. 18 Sept., 1687. 

Children by wife Mary : 

116-33 Samuel 3 , b. 4 Nov., 1691. 
116-34 Sarah 3 , b. 15 Feb., 1692-3. 
116-35 James 3 , b. 9 April, 1695. 
116-36 Mary 3 , b. 28 Jan., 1698-9. 
116-37 Josiah 3 , b. 14 March, 1700-1. 
116-38 Ruth 3 , b. 4 June, 1704. 
116-39 Elizabeth 3 , b. 26 May, 1706. 
116-40 George 3 , b. 13 Aug., 1708. 

116-8 Samuel Wood (TMmas m ) born 26 Dec, 
1666; married 21 Jan., 1688-9, Margaret, daughter of 
Nathaniel Eli thorp* 12 - 1 . He died "comcing from Canady," 
25 Nov., 1690. 

3 T5y the records two persons. named Josiah Wood were here at the same time, 
one having wile Margaret and children: I Benjamin, b. 22 Sept., 1689; JI Jacob, 
b. 7 April, 170:5. The Church Record mentions the father of this last child as " Jo- 
siah sen." 



EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 63 

His widow Margaret married (2) 19 Aug., 1691, Jon- 
athan Harrirnan 37 " 4 . 
Child : 

116-41 Thomas 3 , b. 4 Nov., 1689; m. Sarah How. 

116-10 Ebenezer Wood (Thomas 116 ) born 29 Dec., 
1671 ; married 5 April, 1695, Eachel Nicholls. 

They were dismissed 14 July, 1717, from our church 
to Mendon : 

Children born here : 

116-42 James 3 , b. 28 April, 1696. 
116-43 Ebenezer 3 , b. 6 Dec, 1698. 
116-44 Jonathan 3 , b. 2 Nov., 1701. 
116-45 David 3 , b. 30 May, 1704. 
116-46 Samuel 3 , b. 21 May, 1706. 
116-47 Jane 3 , b. 2 March, 1708-9. 
116-48 Moses 3 , b. 3 April, 1712. 
116-49 Eiiphalet 3 , bapt. 15 Aug., 1714. 

116-41 Thomas Wood {Samuel 11 ™, Thomas 116 ) born 
4 Nov., 1689; married 28 Feb., 1711-2, Sarah, daugh- 
ter of John How of Ipswich, where she was born 8 Feb., 
1692-3. She died 21 Jan., 1714-5. He married (2) 
30 Sept., 1715, Sarah, daughter of Thomas Gage. She 
died 17 April, 1731. He married (3) 27 March, 1733, 
widow Susannah Candige of Gloucester. She died 6 
April, 1754. He died 10 Jan., 1765. 

Child by first wife : 

116-50 Thomas 4 , b. 11 Jan., 1712-3; m. 2 June, 1736, Margaret Chap- 
lin 21-17 . She died 31 March, 1770. He m. 2nd, 9 Sept., 1771, 
Elizabeth, widow of Isaac Burpee 19 ' 35 . He died 20 May, 1779. 
His widow Elizabeth m. 3rd, 1 Dec, 1782, David Hammond 
of Ipswich, and died here 21 Oct., 1815, aged 92 years. 

Children by second wife : 

116-51 Sarah 4 , b. 22 Aug., 1717; d. 13 May, 1736. 

116-52 Samuel 4 , b. 5 Feb., 1719-20; m. (pub. — Feb., 1744) Mary 

of Attleborough. She died . He m. 2nd (pub. 10 Nov., 

1753) Hannah Webster of Kingston. 



64 EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 

116-53 Jonathan 4 , bapt. 25 Feb., 1721-2; d. 11 March, 1721-2. 
116-54 Jonathan 4 , b. 5 Juue, 1723; in. 17 July, 1749, Hannah Dresser 

He died 17 Feb., 1805. 
116-55 Margaret 4 , b. 15 July, 1725. 



WORM WELL. 

117 Joseph Wormwell, 1642, was here a short 
time with his wife Miriam. In 1645, Mr. Thomas Nel- 
son 73 mentions in his will a parcel of ground near the mill 
" which was lately in the occupation of Joseph Worma- 
hill." He died at Scituate (see abstract of his will, Hist. 
Gen. Register, Vol. VI, p. 94). 

Child born here : 

117-1 Josiah 2 , b. — 8mo., 1642, the last on my alphabetical list; and, by 
a tradition, the first born here, which honor belongs to Ed- 
ward Carlton 20 - 2 . 



SUPPLEMENT. 



In the change of the boundary line between Rowley and 
Ipswich in 1784, two farms were annexed to Rowley, 
viz. : those originally owned and occupied by Cross, 
and Bradstreet. In 1784 the Cross farm was in the 
ownership and occupancy of the Rowley family of Harris, 
while the Bradstreet farm was still owned and occupied 
by the Bradstreets and so remains to this day. For this 
reason the Bradstreet family was omitted in the alpha- 
betical order. 

1 Humphrey Bradstreet came from Ipswich, Eng- 
land in the ship Elizabeth, — William Andrews, master — 
the last of April, 1634, bringing with him his wife Bridget, 
aged thirty years and children, Hannah, aged nine years, 



EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 65 

John, aged three years, Martha, aged two years and Mary, 
aged one year. At this time he was forty years old. He 
had a grant of land in Ipswich, Mass., north of Egypt 
river. He was made freeman 6 May, 1635, and was rep- 
resentative for Ipswich, 1635. He died in the summer of 
1655. He was a member of the church in Rowle}', and was 
buried in Rowley. His will, dated 21 July, 1655, proved 
25-7mo., 1655, mentions : wife Bridget ; son Moses is to 
have the homestead after the decease of his mother ; son 
John is to have the farm at Muddy river ; daughter Hannah 
Rofe ; daughter Martha Beale ; daughter Mary Bradstreet ; 
daughter Sarah Bradstreet ; daughter Rebecca Bradstreet ; 
grandchildren Daniel Rofe, Hannah Rofe and Samuel 
Beale ; the poor of Ipswich ; the poor of Rowley. 

Widow Bridget Bradstreet died Nov., 1665. Her 
will, dated 16 Oct., 1665, proved 28 March, 1666, men- 
tions : son Moses ; eldest daughter Martha ; daughter Mary 
Kimball ; daughter Wall is ; daughter Rebecca Bonfield ; 
grandchild Hannah Rofe ; Samuel Platts, executor (Essex 
Probate on file). 

Children : 

I. Hannah, 2 m. Daniel Rofe [Rolfe]. 
II. John, 2 m. Hannah, daughter of John Peach of Marblehead, Mass. 
He died at Marblehead, 1600, without issue. His widow Han- 
nah m. (2) William Waters. 

III. Martha, 2 m. William Beale of Marblehead. 

IV. Mary, 2 m. John Kimball. 

Sarah, 2 b. 1638 ; m. 13 April, 1657, Nicholas Wallis. 

V. Rebecca, 2 b. ; m. George Bondfleld of Marblehead. 

2 VI. Moses, 2 b. 1613; m. Elizabeth Harris. 

2 Capt. Moses Bradstreet (Humphrey 1 ) born in 
Ipswich, 1643; married 11 March, 1661-2, Eliz- 
abeth, daughter of John and Bridget Harris of Rowley. 
She died . 

HIST. COLL. XXIV 5 



66 EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 

He married (2) after 18 March, 1683-4, Sarah, widow 
of Samuel Prime and daughter of Samuel Platts. She 
died before 1697. He was a member of the Rowley church 
and captain of the Rowley Military Company. His grave- 
stone in Rowley is the oldest now extant. A copy of it 
appears in the margin. 

His will, dated 16 Aug., 1690, 
proved 30 Sept., 1690, men- 
tions : wife (unnamed) so that 
"all the estate real & personal 
of hers & her children by her 
former husband be at her dis- 
posal" and that she have addi- 
tional estate for bringing up 
"our young son Jonathan" ; son 
John who is to have one half the 



HEAR LYS WHAT WAS 

MORTAL OF y WORTHY 

CAP. MOSES BRADSTREET 

DESEASED AUGUST y 

17 1690 & IN ^ 47th 

YEAR OF HIS AGE 

Friends & Relations 
You might Behold 
A Lamb of God 
Fitt for the Fold 



farm, "yt was my Father Broadstreet's ;" son Moses to 
have the other half of the farm and all the buildings ; son 
John to have £20 and "the share in the ship he goes to sea 
in" instead of one-half the buildings ; son Humphrey to 
have land in Rowley ; son Nathaniel to have one-half the 
lands in Haverhill ; son Jonathan to have the other half 
the lands in Haverhill ; daughters Bridget and Hannah 
(Essex Probate 4: 257). 

Children, born in Ipswich, baptized in Rowley : 

31. John, 3 b. — Dec, 1662; m. Hannah Dummer. 

4 II. Moses, 3 b. 17 Oct., 1665; m. Hannah Pickard. 

III. Elizabeth, 3 b. 22 March, 1666-7; m. 22 June, 1685, Samuel Pick- 
ard. She was buried 28 May, 1686. 

5 IV. Humphrey, 3 b. 6 Jan., 1669-70; m. Sarah Peirce. 

6 V. Nathaniel, 3 bapt. 14 Jan., 1671-2; m. Priscilla Carrell. 

VI. Hannah, 3 bapt. 9 Nov., 1673. 

VII. Samuel, 3 bapt. 22 Aug., 1675; d. in infancy. 

VIII. Bridget, 3 bapt. 3 Dec, 1676. 

IX. Aaron, 3 bapt. 18 Jan., 1679-80; d. in infancy. 



EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 67 

X. Samuel, 3 bapt. 14 May, 1G82; d. in infancy. 
XI. Samuel, 3 b. 4 May; bapt. 3 July, 1687; d. in infancy. 
XII. Jonathan, 3 bapt. 22 June, 1690; in. Sarah Wheeler. 



3 John Bradstreet {Cap. Moses, 2 Humphrey 1 ) born 
in Ipswich, December, 16G2 ; married 29 January, 1690-1, 
Hannah, daughter of Richard and Elizabeth (Appleton) 
Dnmmer of Newbury. She was born in Newbury 12 
Aug., 1674 (Coffin). He was a mariner commanding the 
trading ship "Unity." He died on the Island of Barba- 
does, 21 July, 1699. 

The after history of his widow Hannah and the three 
children mentioned below is wholly unknown to me. 
Children born in Ipswich, baptized in Rowley : 

I. Moses, 4 b. 11 Nov., bapt. 15 Nov., 1691. 
II. Elizabeth, 4 bapt. 28 Jan., 1693-4. 

III. Hannah, 4 bapt. 14 Feb., 1696-7. Did she marry Minot 

or was it her mother? 

4 Moses Bradstreet (Cap. Moses, 2 Humphrey 1 ) 
born in Ipswich 17 Oct., 1665; married 19 July, 1686, 
Hannah, daughter of John and Jane (Crosby) Pickard of 
Rowley. She died 3 Jan., 1736-7, aged 67 years (grave- 
stone in Rowley). He married (2) 20 Oct., 1737, Dor- 
othy, widow of Ezekiel Northend of Rowley and daughter 
of Henry Sewall of Newbury. She died 17 June, 1752, 
aged 84 years (gravestone in Rowley). He died 20 Dec, 
1737, in his 73rd year (gravestone in Rowley). His will, 
dated 19 Dec, 1737, proved 9 Jan., 1737-8, mentions: 
wife Dorothy; son Nathaniel who is to have the home- 
stead ; daughter Elizabeth Parker ; daughter Hannah 
Wood's children ; grandchildren Nathan Wood, Phebe 
Wood, Hannah Andreas, Bridget Pemberton, Abigail 
Bradstreet, Hannah Bradstreet, Moses Bradstreet (Essex 
Probate 25: 10). 



68 EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 

Children : 

I. Elizabeth 4 , b. 19 April, bapt. 21 April, 1089; in. (pub. 11 May, 

1711) Lieut. Abraham Parker of Bradford. 
II. Hannah 4 , b. 21 April, bapt. 22 April, 1094 ; m. (pub. Dec. 1713), 
Jacob Wood of Boxford. 

III. Bridget 4 , b. 17 March, bapt. 22 March, 1695-6, d. 22 July, 1718 

(gravestone). 

IV. Moses 4 , bapt. 27 Feb., 1G97-8; m. Abigail Lunt. 

V. John 4 , bapt. 21 April, 1700; d. 12 May, 1724 (gravestone), unm. 
VI. Nathaniel 4 , bapt. 25 June, 1704; d. in infancy. 
8 VII. Nathaniel 4 , bapt. 18 Nov., 1705; m. Hannah Northend. 
VIII. Jane 4 , bapt. 15 Feb., 1707-8; ra. 2 July, 1728, John Manning. 
Not mentioned in her father's will, 1737. 

5 Doctor Humphrey Bradstreet {Copt. Moses 2 , 
Humphrey 1 ) born in Ipswich, 6 Jan., 1667-70; married 

Sarah, daughter of Joshua and Dorothy (Pike) 

Peirce of Newbury. He lived for a time in Rowley, then 
moved to Newbury where he became quite noted as an 
able physician. He died 11 May, 1717. His will, dated 
7 May, 1717, proved 1 July, 1717, mentions : wife Sarah ; 
oldest son Humphrey ; son Daniel ; son Benjamin to be 
sent to college ; son Moses ; daughters Dorothy Sargent, 
Sarah Tufts, Anna Bradstreet and Betty Bradstreet 
(Essex Probate 12: 49). 

His widow Sarah married (2) 9 June, 1719, Capt. 
Edward Sargent. 

Children (the first three were born and baptized in Row- 
ley and there recorded but their names also appear of 
record in Newbury, where the other children were born) : 

I. Dorothy 4 , b. ID Dec, 1692, bapt. 3 Dec., 1G93; m. in Newbury, 

1G Oct., 1710, Nathaniel Sargent. 
II. Joshua 4 , I). 23 Feb., bapt. 24 Feb., 1094-5; drowned 10 May, 

1710. 

III. Sarah 4 , b. 14 Jan., bapt. 17 Jan., 109G-7; m. 9 Dec, 1714, Rev. 

John Tufts of Newbury. 

IV. Humphrey 4 , b. ; died in Newbury, 19 Dec, 1717, aged 19 

years. Styled Doctor on Newbury record. 



EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 69 

V. Daniel 4 , b. 13 Feb., 1700-1 ; d. in Newbury, 24 April, 1723, in his 
23rd year. Styled Doctor on Newbury record. 

VI. Benjamin 4 , b. ; ra. 9 Nov., 1720, Sarah Greenleaf He was 

a minister and settled in Gloucester. 
VII. Moses 4 , b. 17Feb.,1707; m. in Gloucester, 1G Feb., 1731, Mary 
Say ward of Gloucester. He died in Newburyport, 9 March, 
1785. 

VIII. Anna 4 , b. ; m. 7 Nov , 1728, Benjamin Moody. 

IX. Betty 4 , b. 1G May, 1713; m. 30 Aug., 1731, Rev. William John- 
son of Newbury. She died 2 Aug., 175G, in her 43rd year. 

6 Nathaniel Bradstreet {Captain Moses 2 , Hum- 
phrey 1 ) born in Ipswich, baptized in Rowley, 14 Jan., 
1671-2; married in Rowley, 16 Oct., 1688, Priscilla 
Carrell. His home was in Rowley. He died in the un- 
fortunate Canada expedition 1690. The inventory of his 
estate was taken 28 Sept., 1691. 

His widow Priscilla married (2) in Rowley, 26 April, 
1694, Samuel Todd of Rowley. 
Child : 

:. Priscilla, b. 22 Sept., 1G89; m. 14 June, 1707, Nehemiah Jewett 
of Rowley. 

7 Jonathan Bradstreet ( Capt. Moses 2 , Humphrey' ) 
3orn in Ipswich, baptized in Rowley, 22 June, 1690. Jo- 
?iah Wood was appointed 6 May, 1700, his guardian. He 
narried in Rowley, 7 Nov., 17 L0, Sarah, daughter of 
Jonathan and Mary Wheeler of Rowley. She was bap- 
ized in Rowley 15 May, 1692. "Capt. Jonathan Brad- 
street and Sarah his wife and Dorcas Bradstreet wife of 
Samuel dismissed to Lunenburg whither they are removed 
&pril 15, 1739" (Georgetown Church. Record). 

Children born in Rowley and baptized in Byfield Parish : 

I. Samuel 4 , b. 9 Aug., 1711 ; m. 9 Nov., 1736, Dorcas Spofford. 
II. Mary 4 , b. 5 May, 1714; m. 10 Jan., 1737-8, David Chaplin. 

III. Jonathan 4 , b. 11 Feb., 1719-20. 

IV. Sarah 4 , b. 11 Jan., 172G-7. 



70 EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 

8 Lieut. Nathaniel Bradstreet (Moses\ Capt. 
Moses 2 , Humphrey 1 ) born in Ipswich, baptized in Kowley, 
18 Nov., 1705 ; married in Rowley, 19 April, 1727, Hani 
nah, daughter of Ezekiel and Dorothy (Sewall) Northend 
of Rowley. She was born in Rowley, 31 January, 
1702-3 and died 11 April, 1739 aged 36 years (grave- 
stone in Rowley). He married (2) in Rowley 15 August, 
1739, Hannah, daughter of Thomas and Hannah (Platts) 
Hammond of Ipswich. She was baptized in Rowley, — 
July, 1716 and died in Ipswich. 

Her will, dated 2Q Oct., 1787, proved 7 May, 1792, 
mentions : sons Nathaniel and John ; daughters Mary 
Pearson and Sarah Coburn ; and children of deceased 
daughter Elizabeth Plumer ; son-in-law Nathan Pearson 
executor (Essex Probate 62: 34). He died in Ipswich 
2 Dec, 1752, in his 48 th year (gravestone in Rowley).] 
His will, dated 30 Nov., 1752, proved 25 Dec, 1752,] 
mentions : wife Hannah who is to have "that land which 
was in my uncle John's division ;" son Moses to have the 
homestead ; son Nathaniel ; son John ; daughters Eliza- 
beth, Mary, Sarah and Hannah (Essex Probate 31 : 50). J 

Children by first wife (baptisms from Rowley Chh. 
Rec) : 

I. Moses, 5 bapt. 4 Feb., 1727-8; m. 12 Dec, 1749, Lucy Pickard. 
She died 9 June, 1816, aged 88 years (gravestone). He died 
1 Nov., 1811, aged 83 years (gravestone). They had eight 
children. 
II. John, 5 bapt. 13 July, 1729; died young. 

III. Hannah, 5 bapt. 9 Nov., 1730; died young. 

IV. Hannah, 5 bapt. 14 Nov., 1731 ; m. Richard Shatswell of Ipswicl 

She died in Ipswich, 20 Sept., 1807, aged 70 years "of old aj 
and influenza" (Ips. Rec). 
V. Nathaniel, 5 bapt. 1 Sept., 1734; died young. 
VI. Ezekiel, 5 bapt. 25 Oct., 1735; died young. 
VII. Nathaniel, 5 bapt. 31 July, 1737; died young. 
VIII. Jane, 5 bapt. 25 Feb., 1738-9; died young. 



EARLY SETTLERS OF ROWLEY. 



71 



Children by second wife : 

IX. Nathaniel, 5 bapt. 20 June, 1740; m. 7 Dec, 1762, Phebe Jewett. 
She died 18 Dec., 1815 (gravestone) 1814 (Rowley Rec). He 
died 28 March, 1806 (gravestone) 27 March (Rowley Rec). 
X. Elizabeth, 5 bapt. 25 Sept., 1743 ; m. 31 May, 1764, Samuel Plumer 

of Newbury. She died in Rowley, 5 July, 1774. 
XI. John, 5 bapt. 26 June, 1748; m. in Newbury, 14 Feb., 1771, Ju- 
dith Hale of Newbury. 
XII. Mary, 5 bapt. 24 June, 1750; m. 20 June, 1774, Nathan Pearson. 
XIII. Sarah, 5 bapt. 1 Oct., 1752; in. Coburn. 



HALF-MILE STONE, WENHAM. 




This stands -a mile from the Old Burying Ground, on the road to Ipswich; ref- 
erence is made to it in Hist. Coll., Vol. XX, p. 234. 



INSCRIPTIONS FROM GRAVESTONES IN THE 
OLD BURYING GROUND IN WENHAM. 



[Continued from page 306, Vol. XX.] 

Here lies Y e | body of Mrs | Elizabeth Bpown y 6 | 
Wife of Mr. Nathaniel | Brown who Died | Septem-j 

BER Y e 4 th | 1731 IN Y e 54 th I YEAR OF HER AGE. 

In Memory of | Mrs. Anna Brown | wife of | Na- 
thaniel Brown Esq r . | who departed this life | Sep 1 .! 
9 th 1781, in the | 63 d year of her age. 

Blessed are the dead which 
die in the Lord. 

Here Lies y e Body | of M rs Hannah y e | Wife of Nath 1 
Brown | Died Sept r the 11 | 1750 in her 62 d year. 

In Memory of | Capt. Pelatiah Brown, | who died | 
Feb. 14, 1830; | aged 94 years. 

In Memory of | Mrs Hannah Brown, | wife of | Cap t .| 
Palatiah Brown, | who departed this life | Feb. 1 st 1801 
in the 61 st | year of her age. 

Pass on my friends dry up your tears 
I must lie here till christ appears. 
Death is a debt to nature due 
I've paid the debt & so must you. 

Sacred | to the memory of | Mrs. Elizabeth Brown 
I wife to the late | Capt. Pelatiah Brown | who died 
July 21, 1836, | in the 92 year of her | Age. 

(72) 



from gravestones in wenham. 73 

Here lies Buried | the body of | M rs Sarah Baker 
| wife of cap t I John Baker Died | January 2 1743 | 
in y e 36 year | of her age. 

John Baker | Son of Cap t | John & Sarah | Baker 

DIED SEP T I 22 1745 IN | THE 21 YEAR | OF HIS AGE. 

Henry A. Baker, | son of | Mr. Cornelius & | Mrs. 
Caroline Baker; | Born Sep. 2, 1820, | Died Aug. 31, 
1821. 

In Memory of | M rs Anna Herrick | wife of | Mr. John 
Herrick | who died | December 25 th | 1769. | Aged 95 
years. 

In Memory of | Mr. Joshua Herrick, | who died | 
April 3, 1830 ; | in the 79 year | of his age. 

In Memory of | Mrs. Rachel Herrick | wife of | Mr. 
Joshua Herrick | who died | Sept. 14, 1813, ] Mt 50. 

Joshua Herrick Jr. | Died June 2, 1853, | Aged 70 
Years. 

Mrs. Sarah A | Wife of | Joshua Herrick Jr. | Died | 
June 6, 1843, | Aged 56. 

Memento Mori | In Memory of | Dea n John Friend | 
who Departed this | Life Feb y y e 25 th 1785; | Aged 67 
years. 

The Great I am his Summons Sends 

And Calls us to the Grave 

Then Like him Self Thunders Alowd 

And Calls us to the Skies. 

In Memory of | Mr. John Friend | who died | Nov. 
20 1793 ; | in the 55 year of his age. 

Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord. 

In Memory of | M r8 Sarah Friend | wife of M B John 
Friend Jun r | who departed this Life | Mayy e 4 th 1766 
| Aged 22 Years. 

HIST. COLL. XXIV 5* 



74 FROM GRAVESTONES IN WENHAM. 

Hannah, | wife of | John Friend | died | Jan. 19, 
1829, | M. 83. 

Here lies Buried | The body of | M rs . Sarah Friend 
| wife of Deacon | John Friend who | departed this 

LIFE | JAN UY THE 28 A.D. | 1763 AND IN I THE 78 YEAR | 
OF HER AGE. 

Bethiah I Daughter of | M r . John and | Martha 
| Friend who | Died | Jan by 28 | 1765 in the | tenth 
year I of her Age. 

In Memory | of | Simeon Friend | Born May 7, 1780, 
| Died March 10, | 1860. | Also his wife | Hannah P. 
Friend, | Born July 24, 1784, | Died Nov. 20, | 1862. 
Mary E. | dau r of | Simeon & Hannah | Friend, | 
Died | Dec. 14, 1839, | M. 23. 

In Memory of | Mr. Richard Friend | who died | 
Nov. 4 1788, | in the 47 year | of his Age. 

In Memory of | Mrs Hannah Friend | relict of the 
late | Mr. Richard Friend | who died | Feb. 14 1807 ; | 
in the 62 year of her age. 

In Memory of, | Miss Priscilla Friend, | who died | 
Jan. 28, 1834 | aged 81 years. 

In Memory of | Edith Friend | who died | Jan. 8, 

1844, | Aged 65 Yrs. 

" Adieu, my friends a long adieu, 
I leave the joys of earth with you, 

I seek a heav'nly prize. 
May you in Jesus, too be found 
And when the trump of God shall sound, 

In his blest image rise." 

Nancy Friend, | Died | May 18, 1862, | Aged 87 yrs. 

No cloud those blissful regions know, 

Reims ever bright and fair; 
For sin, the source of mortal wo, 

Can never enter there. 






FROM GRAVESTONES IN WENHAM. 75 

Iii Memory of | Mr. James Friend, | who died | March 
4, 1831, | aged 90 years. 

Far from affliction, toil and care, 

The happy soul is fled ; 
The breathless clay shall slumber here 

Among the silent dead. 

In Memory of | Mrs. Anna Friend | who died | Nov. 
2, 1815, | aged 75 years. | Also | Mrs. Susanna Friend 
| who died | Feb. 16, 1831, | aged 77 years. | Wives of 
Mr. James Friend. 

Here lies buried | the body of Mr s | Loes the 
wife of I M R Isaac Dodge | who Departed | this life 
Sep t 11 th I 1752 in the 38 th | ykar of her age. 

In Memory of | Mr. Peter Dodge | who died Sept. 
14 th | 1795. | Aged 71 Years. 

In I Memory of | Widow | Elizabeth Dodge. | wife 
of | Mr. Peter Dodge, | who died | June 21, 1821; | in the 
85 year of | her age. 

Mrs. Rebecca Dodge, | Died Oct. 10, 1825 ; | aged 50 
years. 

Miss Rebecca F. Dodge | died April 11, 1827, | aged 
24 years. 

Mrs :Lydia Dodge | Died | June 18, 1845 ; | Aged 58. 

"She sleeps in Jesus and is blest, 

How sweet her slumbers are, 
From suffering and from sin released, 

And free from every care." 

John T. Dodge | died Feb. 26, 1836, | aged 46 y'rs 9 
mos. 

Harriet Shaw | wife of | John T. Dodge | Born Apr. 
13, 1793, | Died May 1, 1876. 






76 FROM GRAVESTONES IN WENHAM. 

Martha Ann, | Died Nov. 5, 1820 | Mt. 3. | Harriet 
G. | died Nov. 7, 1820, | Mt. 1. | Children of Capt. John 
T. & | Mrs. Harriet S. Dodge. 

Though thy presence so endearing, 

We thy absence now deplore ; 
At the Saviors bright appearing 

We shall meet to part no more. 

Priscilla Dodge. 1 

The Property of | Uzziel Dodge. | Built 1827. 2 

In | Memory of | M B John Gardner | who died Oc- 
tober 27 th 1805. | M 74: Years. 

M BS Elizabeth Gardner, | died Oct. 12 th 1823, | aged 
86. 

Samuel Blanchard Esq. | Died May 4, 1813, | Aged 
57. 

M R8 Elizabeth Blanchard | died June 24, 1816. | 
Aged 57 years. 

Francis Blanchard Esq. | Died June 26 th 1813, | aged 
29 years. 

In Memory of | Mrs. Lucy Orne, | wife of | Charles 
Henry Orne, | of Salem ; and daughter of the late | 
Samuel Blanchard, Esq. | of "Wenhain | Died June 16, 
1815. | Mt. 22. 

In Memory of | Mr. | Edward Perkins, | who | de- 
parted this life | June 13, 1853, | Mt. 93 Yrs. 11 mo's. 21 
d'ys. 

Blessed are the dead, which die in the Lord. 



1 This inscription is on the footstone. The face of the headstone containing 
the inscription is shelled oil* and loht. 

2 This inscription is on the stone erected over the front end of the tomb. 



FROM GRAVESTONES IN WENHAM. 77 

Mrs. | Sally | wife of | Mr. Edward Perkins, | died 
May 30, 1821 | Mi. 58. 

Friends nor Physician could not save 
My mortal Body from the grave. 

Here Lies y e body | of Hannah y e | wife of Thomas | 
Perkins who | died October y e 2 d | 17 (— ) 3 in y e 37 year 
| of. her age. 

Sacred | To the Memory of | Mr. John Perkins, | 
who died | Feb. 4, 1847 ; | Aged 93. 

Mrs. Abigail | widow of the late | Samuel Ober (de- 
ceased) | Died | Oct. 3, A. D. 1854, | Aged 96 y'rs. | & 
6 mos. 

In Memory of | Samuel Ober, | who died | April 14, 
1833 ; | Aged 80. 

Also two of his Sons | Josiah Ober, | died in Balti- 
more | Oct. 24, 1793 ; | Aged 14J years. 

Oliver Ober, | died April 21, 1805 ; | Aged 24 years. 

Elizabeth K. Ober | Daughter of Oliver Ober | died 
Jan. 4, 1804 | Aged 4 J months. 

Abigail H. Tuttle | Died | Mar. 7, 1870 | M. 79 
y'rs. 

At rest. 

In Memory of | Miss Hannah Goodrid ge | who died | 
June 9 1796. | Mt. 54. 

Death is a debt to nature due, 
I've paid the debt & so must you. 



3 The last two figures of the year are illegible. The church records give the 
year 1727. 



78 FROM GRAVESTONES IN WENHAM. 

In memory of | Mary | widow of ] Capt. Joseph Lam- 
bert | and Daughter of | Cap* John White | who died | 
Nov. 5, 1802 | Aged 68. 

Benjamin Howe | Son of | Samuel & Priscilla | Co- 
nant I Died Aug. 12, 1842. | Aged 16 Months. 

Id Memory of | Aaron D. Barnes | who died | July 
28, 1845, | M. 40 yrs. 

PaulM. Barnes | Died May 29, 1821 ; | Aged 14 years. 

" Not lost, but gone before." 

Elizabeth | wife of Daniel | Merrill, | died | Feb. 8, 

1827, | M. 38 y'rs. 

Amos F. | Hobbs. | Died— Aug. 1 1841. | M. 46. 

BethiahG. I relict of | Amos F. Hobbs, | died | March 
6, 1860, | aged 65 yrs. 8 mos. 

Sacred | To the Memory of | Miss Mary Whit- 
tredge I who died | March 10 1827, | aged 21 years. 

Sleep precious dust, in calm repose, 
The toils and pains, are at a close; 
Thy happy soul with Jesus rests 
In heavenly mansions with the blest. 

In Memory of | 2 children of | M r Henry & | Mrs. 
Mary Potter. 

Henry William, | died July 22, 1826; | aged 4 years 
& 9 mo. | William Henry | died Dec. 2, 1820; | Aged 6 
days. 

The fairest rose must fade and fall, 
Death loves a shining mark. 



FEOM GRAVESTONES IN WENHAM. 79 

Annis C. I Daughter of | Harvey & Mary Jane | 
Pierce, | Died Sep 1 23 1845 ; | Aged 9 years and | 5 
months. 

Jesus removed the lovely flower, 
Safe to his own immortal bower, 
To bloom in Paradise more fair 
And shed a richer fragrance there. 

Eebecca S. I wife of | Ezra Shattuek. | Died Feb. 3 
1833, Aged 37 y'rs. 

Then shall the dust return unto earth as it was, and the spirit shall 
return unto the God who gave it. 

Iii Memory of | Mr. Nath l B. Shattuck, | who died | 
Feb. 27, 1843 ; | Aged 34. 

William Langmaid, | Died | Dec. 11, 1856 | Aged 40 
yrs. | & 9 mos. 

In Memory of | Mr. | Nathan Preston | who died | 
April 10, 1826, | Aged 40. 

Elizabeth D. | died Dec. 24, 1813, | Aged 4 yrs. 7 
mos. | William H. | Died Dec. 23, 1825 | Aged 4 Yrs: 
6 mos. | Children of | Nathan & Hannah | Preston. 

Thomas Masury, | Died | Jan. 22, 1846, | Aged 50. | 
Father. 

Wm. | Ehodes I who departed | this Life | Sept. 23, 
1851, | aged 61 yrs. | &5 mos. 

Children methinks I see 

you weep, 
Though far across the sea, 
But do not let your 

spirits droop, 
I never shall happier be. 

David | Starrett, | died | Mar. 13, 1845. | ffi. 45. 



80 FROM GRAVESTONES IN WENHAM. 

Sacred | To the Memory of | Mrs. Mary | wife of Mr. 
David | Starrett, | who died | Sept. 5, 1839; | Aged35. 

Dear friends, be wise, 'tis time to know 
The fading state of things below; 
Let every moment as it flies, 
Direct your thoughts above the skies. 

Louisa Restieaux | dau. of David & | Catherine M. 
Starrett, | Died | Aug. 18, 1851; | M. 5 mos. 

Mary Ann | daughter of | Capt. David & | Mrs. Mary 
Starrett | died Sept. 15, 1827, | aged 10 months. 

Sacred | To the Memory of | John Davis | Born April 
5, 1792 | Died June 16, 1838. 

A Man of Worth. 4 

Annah Elizabeth | dau. of Israel W. | & Elizabeth 
R. | Davis | died | July 10, 1853 | Aged 1 y r 9 mos. 

Alas, how changed that lovely flower, 
Which bloomed and cheer'd our hearts; 
Fair smiling comfort of an hour; 
How soon we're call'd to part. 9 

Halcy K. I died Apr. 7, 1838, | M. 2 yrs. 5 mo. | 
Orin A. I died Sept. 9, 1834 | M. 1 yr. 4 mos. | 
Lydia A. I died Jan. 4, 1831, | Children of John | & 
Nancy W. | Mildroi. 

Sleep on sweet babes 

and take your rest 
For Jesus Christ 

doth think it best. 

E K 5 



4 These two were removed to the family lot in the new part of the " ground'' 
in April, 1884. 

The above initials are inscribed on a common slab stone standing at a small 
grave near the " monument" of the lie v. Joseph Gerrish. 



HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS 

OF THE 

ESSEX INSTITUTE. 

Vol. XXIV. April, May, June, 1887. Nos. 4, 5, 6. 
NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 

PORTIONS OF A PAPER READ BEFORE THE BEVERLY LYCEUM, 
APRIL, 1833. 



BY ROBERT RANTOUB. SENR. 



By the collision between the Colonization society and 
the Anti-slavery society, the subject of African bondage has 
been made a subject of interest in almost every village. 
Both of these societies have enforced their views upon us, 
but we shall perhaps be better qualified to judge of their 
respective merits by a more dispassionate examination of 
the subject than the partisans of either of these societies 
would help us to. 

The county now consists of twenty-six towns. Salem 
has the greatest number of inhabitants and Andover has 
the largest territory. The population of the county was 
in 1790, 57,913; in 1800, 61,196; in 1810, 71,888; in 
1820, 74,655; in 1830, 82,887. These numbers include 
the colored population, consisting principally of negroes 
and mulattoes. The number of this description of persons 

tHIST. COLL. xxiv 6 (81) 



82 



NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 



in the New England states has always been small. Slavery, 
if it ever legally existed in Massachusetts, ceased on the 
adoption of the constitution of 1780 which declares all men 
to be born free and equal, let the color of their skin be 
what it may. 

The census of the colored people in the six New Eng- 
land States is as follows : 



1790 


1800 


1810 


1820 


1830 


780 


864 


970 


925 


607 


4,411 


3,685 


3,717 


3,646 


3,578 


538 


812 


969 


995 


1,242 


5,560 


6,281 


6,763 


8,041 


8,072 


272 


557 


750 


918 


881 


5,463 


6,452 


6,737 


6,870 


7,006 


17,024 


18,651 


19,906 


21,395 


21,386 



New Hampshire 
Rhode Island... 

Maine 

Connecticut 

Vermont 

Massachusetts. . 



The increase in the six New England states is about 
25f per cent in forty years, which is a little less than the 
increase in Massachusetts, for the same period. Although 
slavery might not legally exist in Massachusetts, yet there 
were slaves in fact who were bought and sold. In 1754 
the number of slaves in Massachusetts was 2,717 of which 
number 1,270 were in Suffolk, and 439 in Essex County, 
and 28 in this town, twelve of whom were males and six- 
teen females. This enumeration excluded the free colored 
population of which at that time there were considerable 
numbers. It is difficult to reconcile the fact that there 
were so many slaves in Massachusetts with the laws that 
are found upon the statute book. In 1644 it was ordered 
by the General Court that there shall never be any bond 
slavery, villeinage or captivity amongst us, unless it be law- 
ful captives taken in just wars, such as willingly sell them- 



NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 83 

selves or are sold to us, and such shall have the liberties 
and Christian usage which the law of God, established in 
Israel concerning such persons, doth morally require. In 
1646, the General Court conceiving themselves bound 
by the first opportunity to bear witness against the heinous 
and crying sin of man-stealing, as also to prescribe such 
timely redress for what is past, and such a law for the fu- 
ture, as may sufficiently deter all others belonging to us 
to have to do in such vile and most odious courses, justly 
abhorred of all good and just men, do order that the negro 
interpreter, with others unlawfully taken, be by the first 
opportunity, at the charge of the country for the present, 
sent to his native country, Guinea, and a letter with him, 
of the indignation of the court thereabouts, and justice 
thereof, desiring our honored governor would please to 
put this order in execution. About sixty years after this, 
a law was made prohibiting the manumission of slaves un- 
less security was given to save the town from charge for 
their support. Laws were also made with particular ref- 
erence to the conduct of slaves. 

The colored population of this county was in 1790, 
880; in 1800, 911; in 1810, 860; in 1820, 654; and in 
1830, 517 ; so that while in forty years the whole popula- 
tion of the county has increased, from 57,913 to 82,887, 
the colored population has decreased from 880 to 517 when 
if it had increased in the same ratio with the whole, the 
number of colored persons would have been 1,259. It 
is difficult to account for the diminution of this class of 
the population in this county, while in the state there has 
been during the same period a gradual increase (in the 
whole of Massachusetts proper, in 1790, the number of 
colored persons was 5,463 ; in 1800, 6,452 ; in 1810, 6,737 ; 
in 1820, 6,870 ; and in 1830, 7,006) ; there being in the 
state an increase in forty years of nearly 28£ per cent, or 



84 NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 

less than half of the ratio of increase of the whole popu- 
lation. It has been conjectured, by philosophical observ- 
ers of the habits of the human race, that the colored 
population of the colder parts of the United States would 
gradually recede towards the warmer latitudes, to which 
their constitutions are better adapted than to the cold re- 
gions of the north. This theory meets with but slender 
support, as yet, but perhaps its effect may have been 
counteracted by the existence of slavery on our western 
border, in the State of New York, until a very recent 
date, so that our numbers have been replenished by the 
desertion of slaves from their masters in that state. This 
is rendered probable from the fact that in the county of 
Berkshire, which borders on the State of New York, in 
1790 there were 323 colored persons, and in 1830, 995, 
while the whole population of the county is less than 
one-half of that of the county of Essex, and has increased 
for the last forty years in a less ratio than Essex. Other 
circumstances may have operated to counteract the influ- 
ence of climate, which, as they may be removed from time 
to time, will leave it to its natural effect in determining 
the residence of the various complexions of which the 
human family is composed. The greatest impediment to 
the operation of natural causes within the United States 
is the existence of slavery in so many of the states, and 
the consequent restraints and impositions, in the states 
where slavery exists, upon the colored population who are 
free. 

Pompey Lovejoy, a negro, died in Andover in February, 
1826, aged one hundred and two. He was born a slave in 
Boston. He lived upon the spot where he died ninety- 
one years. He left a widow aged ninety-eight and two 
unmarried nieces who lived in his family and were called 
children, one sixty-eight and the other fifty years of age. 



NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 85 

Pompey at his death was the oldest man in the County 
of Essex. He enjoyed his mental faculties to the last. 

Slavery has existed in some form or other from a very 
early period of the history of man. We find no mention 
of slaves before the Deluge, but immediately after in the 
curse of Canaan ; whence it is easily inferred that servi- 
tude commenced soon after that time, for in Abraham's 
days we find it generally established. Some will have it 
to have commenced under Nimrod, because it was he who 
first began to make war, and of consequence to make cap- 
tives, and to bring such as he took, either in his battles or 
irruptions, into slavery. 

"Proud Nimrod first the bloody chace began, 
A mighty hunter, and his prey was man." 

Hence probably arose the connection between victory 
and servitude, an idea of which has prevailed among the 
nations of antiquity, and which has uniformly existed in 
one country or another to the present day. 

The writings of Homer describe the manner in which 
slaves were obtained by the Greeks ; it was by piratical 
expeditions against other nations, to captivate men as well 
as to seize and destroy property. Slavery existed in Egypt. 
Joseph was sold by his brethren and carried into Egypt as 
a slave. Slavery spread through Asia and through the 
Grecian and Roman world ; it was in use among the bar- 
barous nations which overturned the Roman Empire and 
therefore existed at the same period, throughout the whole 
of Europe. However, as the northern nations were settled 
in their conquests, the slavery of the human species began 
to decline and on their full establishment it was abolished. 
Some writers have ascribed its decline and abolition to the 
prevalence of the feudal system ; whilst others, much more 
numerous, and with greater strength of argument, have 
maintained that it was the natural effect of Christianity. 



8$ NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 

The advocates of the former opinion allege that the mul- 
titude of little states, which sprang up from one great one 
at this era, occasioned infinite bickerings and matter for 
contention. There was not a state or seigniory which did 
not want all the hands it could muster, either to defend its 
own right, or to dispute that of its neighbors. Thus every 
man was taken into the service : whom they armed they 
must trust, and there could be no trust but in free men. 
Thus the barrier between the two natures was thrown down 
and slavery was no more heard of in the west. That this 
was not the necessary consequence of such a situation is ap- 
parent. The political state of Greece, in its early history, 
was the same as that of Europe, when divided by the feu- 
dal system into an infinite number of small and independent 
kingdoms. There was the same matter therefore for con- 
tention, and the same call for all the hands they could mus- 
ter : the Grecians, in short, in the heroic, were in the same I 
situation in these respects as the feudal barons in the 
Gothic times. It must be allowed, on the slightest con- 
sideration of the subject, that Christianity was admirably 
adapted to, this purpose. It taught that all men were 
originally equal ; that the Deity was no respecter of per- 
sons and that all men were to give an account of their actions 
hereafter. These doctrines could not fail of having their 
proper influence on those who first embraced Christianity 
from a conviction of its truth, and on those of their descend- 
ants afterwards who, by engaging in the crusades, and haz- 
arding their lives and fortunes therein, showed at least an 
attachment to that religion. We find them accordingly 
actuated by these principles. We have proof that the 
feudal system had no share in the honor of suppressing 
slavery, but that Christianity was the only cause ; for the j 
greatest part of the charters, which were granted for the 
freedom of slaves in those times (many of which are still 
extant) were granted — "For the love of God, and the good 



NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 87 

of the soul" : they were founded in short on religious con- 
siderations, that they might procure the favor of the Deity, 
which masters conceived themselves to have forfeited by 
the subjugation of those whom they found to be the objects 
of the divine benevolence and attention equally with them- 
selves. These considerations, which had thus their first 
origin in Christianity, began to produce their effects as the 
different nations were converted, and procured that general 
liberty atlast, which, at the close of the twelfth century, was 
conspicuous in the west of Europe. Within two centuries 
after the suppression of slavery in Europe, the Portuguese, 
in imitation of those piracies which existed in the uncivilized 
ages of the world, made their descents on Africa, and com- 
mitting depredations on the coast, first carried the wretched 
inhabitants into slavery. This practice, thus inconsiderable 
at its commencement, became general; and the English, 
together with the Spaniards, French and most of the mari- 
time powers in Europe, soon followed the piratical exam- 
Die : and thus did the Europeans, to their eternal infamy, 
revive a custom which their own ancestors had so lately 
exploded, from a consciousness of its impiety. The un- 
fortunate Africans fled from the coast, and sought in the 
interior of the country a retreat from the persecution of 
their invaders; but the Europeans still pursued them. 
They entered their rivers, sailed up into the country, sur- 
prised the Africans in their recesses and carried them into 
slavery. The next step which the Europeans found it neces- 
sary to take was that of settling in the country ; of securing 
themselves by fortified posts ; of changing their system of 
force into that of pretended liberality ; and of opening, by 
every species of bribery and corruption, a communication 
with the natives. Accordingly, they erected their forts and 
factories ; landed their merchandise ; and endeavored by 
a, peaceable deportment, by presents, and by every ap- 



88 NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 

pearance of munificence to allure the attachment and con- 
fidence of the Africans. 

The Portuguese erected their first fort at D'Elmina in 
the year 1481, about forty years after Alonzo Gonzales 
had pointed out to his countrymen the southern Africans 
as articles of commerce. The scheme succeeded ; an in- 
tercourse took place between the Europeans and Africans, 
attended with a confidence highly favorable to the views 
of ambition and avarice. In order to render this inter- 
course permanent as well as lucrative, the Europeans, 
having discovered the chiefs of the African tribes, paid 
their court to these, and at length a treaty of peace and 
commerce was concluded ; in which it was agreed that the 
kings, on their part, should, from this period, sentence 
prisoners of war and convicts to European servitude ; and 
that the Europeans should supply them, in return, with the 
luxuries of the north. This agreement immediately took 
effect, and laid the foundation of that abominable traffic in 
human flesh which continued to be carried on by most of 
the maritime powers of Europe until 1807, when the Par- 
liament of Great Britain passed the law for its abolition. 
Their example has, from time to time, been followed by 
other nations, but still this traffic continues to a consider- 
able extent, cupidity inducing adventurers to brave every 
danger, even the bloody laws of most of the nations against 
piracy. 

Abraham had three hundred and eighteen servants, born 
among his property, whom he could intrust with arms. 
This implies that he had many, not born in his house, but 
bought with his money. These, together with those who 
through age or infirmity were incapable of bearing arms, 
and the women and children, would make a considerable 
tribe. 

To punish the indignity received from his son Ham, 



NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 89 

Noah foretold the slavery of his descendants. The de- 
scendants of Abraham always valued themselves on their 
liberty. We have never been servants to any, said the 
Jews. And Paul magnifies the liberty of the true children 
of Abraham as being really free, born of a free mother, in 
opposition to the race of Ishmael, born of a mother who 
was a slave. The Hebrews have, however, been subject 
to several princes ; to the Egyptians, the Philistines, the 
Chaldeans, the Grecians, and the Romans. But this is 
not slavery in the strict sense of the word. Moses notices 
two or three sorts of slaves among the Hebrews who had 
foreign slaves, obtained by capture, by purchase, or born 
in the house. Over these masters had an entire author- 
ity ; they might sell them, exchange them, punish them, 
judge them and even put them to death without public 
process ; in which the Hebrews followed the rules common 
to other nations. 

In Exodus, Moses enacts regulations concerning He- 
brew slaves : " If thou buy a Hebrew servant, six years 
he shall serve, and in the seventh he shall go out free for 
nothing." He adds, " He shall have at going out the same 
clothes he had at coming in, and his wife shall go out with 
him." " If he come in by himself he shall go out by him- 
self; if he were married then his wife shall go out with 
him. If his master have given him a wife, and she hath 
borne him sons or daughters, the wife and children shall 
be her master's and he shall go out by himself. If the ser- 
vant shall plainly say, I love my master, my wife, and 
my children, — I will not go out free ; then his master shall 
bring him unto the j.udges ; he shall also bring him to the 
door, or unto the doorpost of his master's house and his 
master shall bore his ear through with an awl, and he shall 
serve him forever." Several other regulations in regard 
to female slaves are to be found in the laws of Moses. 

HIST. COLL. XXIV 6* 



90 NEGEO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 

A Hebrew might fall into slavery in several ways : 
1. If reduced to extreme poverty, he might sell him- 
self. 2. A father might sell his children as slaves. 3. 
Insolvent debtors might be delivered to their creditors as 
slaves. 4. Thieves not able to make restitution of their 
thefts, or the value, were sold for the benefit of the suffer- 
ers. 5. They might be taken prisoners in war. 6. They 
might be stolen and afterwards sold for slaves, as Joseph 
was sold by his brethren. 7. A Hebrew slave redeemed 
from a Gentile by one of his brethren might be sold by 
him to another Israelite. 

When Samuel declares to the Hebrews the rights and 
prerogatives of a king he says : "He shall take your 
slaves, and your maids, and you yourselves shall be sub- 
ject to him as slaves." The word servant in the scripture 
generally signifies a slave, but sometimes it merely de-' 
notes a man who voluntarily dedicates himself to the ser- 
vice of another. 

Slavery among the Jews as it regarded foreigners was 
also regulated by the law given by Moses. They were 
forbidden to buy and sell those of their own nation as] 
bondmen for life. "Both thy bondmen and thy bond- 
maids, which thou shalt have, shall be of the heathen that 
are round about you ; of them shall ye buy bondmen and 
bondmaids. Moreover of the children of the strangers that 
do sojourn among you, of them shall ye buy and of their 
families that are with you, and they shall be your posses- 
sion. And ye shall take them as an inheritance for your 
children after you, to inherit them for a possession : they 
shall be your bondmen forever." No positive precept of 
Christ forbids slavery. It is very far from the design of 
Christianity to interfere with the national laws of the 
world. On the contrary, it recognizes these laws as the 
institution of God. Nor would it subvert the distinctions 



NEGRO SL AVERT IN MASSACHUSETTS. 91 

which are founded in these laws nor forbid any of the 
pursuits in which men may engage consistently with the 
maintenance of the piety and virtue which it teaches. It 
therefore does not aim at a suppression of commerce and 
the mechanic arts ; it not only does not mar the beautiful 
creations of genius in any of the departments of skill or 
of taste nor confound the ruler with the subject, the em- 
ployer with the employed, or the head which devises with 
the hands which execute, but it would make each of the 
diversities of condition so produced to conduce to the 
perfection of the moral order and happiness of the world. 

The progress of knowledge, the improvement of the 
moral sense, the influence of the Christian religion, as it 
becomes more operative in the conduct of life, — as it is 
made to consist more in right action proceeding from good 
motives, and less in doctrines, opinions, words and profes- 
sions, — these are the great means to which we are to look 
for the improvement of the social state on this continent, 
as well as in the old world. 

When Governor Winthrop came to Boston in 1630 he 
found Samuel Maverick residing on Noddles Island. In 
1639, John Josselyn, who came to New England the year 
before, lodged at Maverick's house, whom he commended 
for his hospitality, and in noting some events in Maver- 
ick's family he mentions three negro servants, and from the 
circumstance related it appears that they were slaves. In 
a collection of laws respecting servants, enacted between 
1630 and 1641, the following provision is contained : "No 
servant shall be put off for above a year to any other, 
neither in the life time of their master, nor after their 
death, by their executors or administrators, unless it be 
by consent of authority assembled in some court, or two 
assistants ; otherwise, all and every such assignment shall 
be void in law. If any man smite out the eye or tooth 



02 NEGEO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 

of his man servant or maid servant, or otherwise maim or 
disfigure them (unless it be by mere casualty) he shall let 
them go free from his service, and shall allow such further 
recompense as the court shall adjudge him. All servants 
that have served diligently and faithfully to the benefit of 
their masters, seven years, shall not be sent away empty ; 
and if any have been unfaithful, negligent, or unprofitable, 
in their service, notwithstanding the good usage of their 
masters, they shall not be dismissed till they have made 
satisfaction according to the judgment of authority." In 
1645 the General Court, which then exercised jurisdiction 
over the settlements at Piscataqua, thought proper to! 
write to Mr. Williams, residing there, "understanding that 
the negroes which Capt. Smyth brought from Guinea, by 
Capt. Smyth's confession were fraudulently and injuriously 
taken, that he forthwith send the negro which he had of 
Capt. Smyth hither ; that he may be sent home, which this 
Court do resolve to send back without delay." "And if 
you have any thing to alledge why you should not return 
him, to be disposed of by the court, it will be expected 
you should forthwith make it appear, either by yourself 
or your agent." About the same time, viz., 1645, a law 
was made "prohibiting the buying and selling of slaves, 
except those taken in lawful war, or reduced to servitude 
for their crimes by a judicial sentence ;" and these were to 
have the same privileges as were allowed by the law of j 
Moses. 

Among the laws for punishing capital crimes, enacted in 
1649, is the following, viz. : 

If any man stealeth a man or mankind, he shall surely 
be put to death. 

Josselyn, in his description of New England, which he 
visited twice, having spent ten years in the country, from 
1663 to 1673, speaking of the people of Boston, says, 



NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 93 

"They have store of children, and are well accommo- 
dated with servants ; of these some are English and others 
negroes." From these facts it appears that negro slavery 
did exist to some small extent. Though discouraged by 
the laws, it was not eradicated. 

Another class of slaves were known here in the early 
periods of our history. These were the aboriginals of the 
country, who had at various times submitted themselves 
to the government, and received its protection ; and had 
enjoyed in a degree the benefits of civilization, and of 
evangelical missions, so that they were denominated pray- 
ing Indians. Of these, some in 1675, 1676 and 1677 did 
join with other natives in the war against the colonies, 
called King Phillip's war. Such of these as were taken 
in arms were adjudged guilty of rebellion. A few of 
them were put to death by a judicial sentence ; but the 
greater part were sold into slavery in foreign countries. 
Some of these latter found their way home, and joined 
with the hostile Indians in a severe revenge on the Eng- 
lish in a succeeding war. 

The African trade never was prosecuted in any great 
degree by the merchants of Massachusetts. No records 
or memorials are remaining by which any thing respecting 
it in the last century can be known. There was a con- 
nection in trade between this colony and that of Barbadoes, 
and some families went from Massachusetts to settle there. 
It is therefore probable that negroes might have been in- 
troduced here by means of that connection. In 1703 a 
duty of £4 was laid on every negro imported, for the 
payment of which both the vessel and master were answer- 
able. It is uncertain how long this duty was exacted. 
There were not more than three ships in a year, belonging 
to Boston, ever employed in the African trade ; there were 
perhaps some from other ports in the state. The rum dis- 






94 NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 

tilled here was the mainspring of the trade, and this ar- 
ticle having been largely manufactured in the County of 
Essex, it is probable that the African trade was prosecuted 
from some of the ports in this County. The slaves pur- 
chased in Africa were chiefly sold in the West Indies, or 
in the southern colonies ; but when those markets were 
glutted and the price low, some of them were brought 
hither. Very few whole cargoes ever came : two or three 
are mentioned and one about the year 1760 which con- 
sisted almost wholly of children. At Khode Island, the 
rum distillery and the African trade were prosecuted to a 
greater extent than in Massachusetts. Sometimes the 
Rhode Island vessels, after having sold their prime slaves 
in the West Indies, brought the remnant of their cargoes 
hither for sale. 

About the time of the stamp act in 1765 this trade began 
to decline in Massachusetts and in 1788 it was prohibited 
by law. This could not have been done, previous to the 
Revolution, as the governors sent hither from England, it 
is said, were instructed not to consent to any acts made 
for that purpose. 

The prohibition of the slave trade was effected in the 
following manner. In the month of February, 1788, 
just after the adoption of the present federal constitution 
by the convention of Massachusetts, a most flagrant vio- 
lation of the laws of society and humanity was perpetrated 
in Boston, by one Avery, a native of Connecticut. By the 
assistance of another infamous fellow, he decoyed three 
unsuspecting black men on board a vessel which he had 
chartered, and sent them down into the hold to work. 
While they were there employed, the vessel came to sail, 
and went to sea, having been previously cleared for Mar- 
tinico. As soon as this infamous transaction was known, 
Governor Hancock and M. L'Etombe, the French consul, 



NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 95 

wrote letters to the governors of all the islands in the 
West Indies in favor of the decoyed blacks. The public 
indignation being greatly excited against the actors in this 
affair, and against others who had been concerned in the 
traffic of slaves, it was thought proper to take advantage 
of the ferment and bring good out of evil. Accordingly 
the association of the Boston clergy originated a petition 
to the legislature, praying for an act to prohibit the equip- 
ping and insuring vessels bound to Africa for slaves, and 
providing against the carrying innocent blacks from home. 
This petition was circulated and signed by a great num- 
ber of reputable citizens. The blacks were urged to pre- 
sent a similar petition, which they did; and fortunately 
another of the same kind, from the society of Quakers 
presented at a former session, was then lying on the table. 
All these were brought up together ; and the effect was 
an act passed March 26, 1788, "to prevent the slave trade, 
and for granting relief to the families of such unhappy 
persons as may be kidnapped or decoyed away from this 
Commonwealth." By this law it is enacted, "that no cit- 
izen residing within this Commonwealth shall for himself 
or any other persons, either as master, factor, supercargo, 
owner or hirer, in whole or in part of any vessel, directly 
or indirectly, import, or transport, or buy, or sell, or re- 
ceive on board his or their vessel with intent to cause to 
be transported or imported, any of the inhabitants of any 
state or kingdom in Africa, as slaves or servants for term 
of years, on penalty of fifty pounds for every person so 
received on board with intent to be imported or trans- 
ported, and two hundred pounds for every vessel fitted 
out with such intent or so employed ; and all insurance 
made on such vessels shall be void." It also further pro- 
vides for the friends of any person decoyed away to bring 
an action, and recover damages which shall be paid to the 



96 NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 

injured person at his return or go to the maintenance of 
his wife and children. 

A prohibitory act of the same nature had a few months 
before been passed in the state of Rhode Island, and soon 
after another was passed in Connecticut. This was the 
utmost that could be done by the state legislature. After 
the adoption of the Federal Constitution, Congress passed 
laws of greater efficiency, as far as the Constitution would 
permit. All these laws have been evaded more or less by 
citizens of this country, but a stigma will ever attend their 
names. 

The three blacks, who were decoyed, were offered for 
sale at the Danish Island of St. Bartholomew. They told 
their story publicly, which coming to the ears of the gov- 
ernor, he prevented the sale. 

A Mr. Atherton of the island generously became bound 
for their good behavior for six months, in which time let- 
ters came informing of their case ; and they were per- 
mitted to return. They arrived at Boston on the 29th 
day of July following, and it was a day of jubilee not only 
among their countrymen but all the friends of justice and 
humanity. It appears that the complete abolition of slav- 
ery in Massachusetts may be fixed at the year 1788. 



[Two Essex county cases are somewhat illustrative of the state of 
feeling prevailing at this period, and abstracts of them, taken from 
the official records, are inserted. — Eds.] 

In the Inferior Court of Common Pleas, Jenny Slew of Ipswich, in 
the county of Essex, spinster, was plaintiff against John Whipple, the 
younger, of said Ipswich, gentleman, defendant, in a plea of trespass 
for that the said John, on the twenty-ninth day of January, A. D. 
1762, at Ipswich aforesaid, with force and arms, took her, the said 
Jenny, held and kept her in servitude as a slave in his service, and 
thus restrained her of her liberty from that time to the fifth of March 
last without any lawful right and authority so to do, and did her other 
injuries against the peace and to the damage of the said Jenny Slew, as 



NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 97 

she saith, the sum of twenty-five pounds. The action was brought on 
a writ dated at Salem, March 9, 1765, returnable at Ipswich and signed 
Joseph Bowditch, clerk. The parties appeared and the case was con- 
tinued. At the next term, the defendant Whipple, by his attorney, Ed- 
mund Trowbridge, esq., filed a plea in abatement for that "there is no 
such person in nature as Jenny Slew of Ipswich aforesaid, spinster, 
and that the said John is ready to verify." This plea was overruled. 
He then moved the court for an indorser on the writ "to be subject to 
costs if any should finally be." Motion overruled. Defendant, saving 
his plea in abatement, pleaded not guilty, etc., and "thereof puthimself 
upon the country," etc., and the case was continued. At the next term 
the plaintiff, reserving all rights, etc., says the defendant's plea is not 
a sufficient answer to the declaration aforesaid, and for want of a suf- 
ficient answer prays judgment for damages and costs, and the de- 
fendant, saving all rights, etc., etc., joins issue and prays for costs 
because the plaintiff refuses to reply to his plea. The Court found the 
defendant's plea in demurrer good, and gave Whipple his costs. The 
plaintiff Slew appealed to the Superior Court of Judicature, and en- 
tered into recognizance to prosecute and pay costs. This at the Sep- 
tember term at Newburyport, present Justices John Choate, Caleb 
Cushing, Nathaniel Ropes, and Andrew Oliver. Benjamin Kent of 
Boston was attorney for Jenny Slew, who gave a bond in the sum of 
£10, with John Chipman and Nathan Bo wen, both of Marblehead, as 
sureties. 

The appeal was reached at November term, 1766, holden at Salem, 
demurrer waived by consent and the issue of fact sent to a jury which 
found for the appellant Jenny Slew, in the sum of £4 "money damage" 
and costs. "It is therefore considered by the court that the former 
judgment be reversed and that the said Slew recover against the said 
Whipple, the sum of four pounds, lawful money of this province, 
damage, and costs taxed at £9.9.6.," and execution issued, Decem- 
ber 4, 1766, accordingly. 

Ten years later, after belligerent captures at sea had brought up the 
question of negro slavery in a new form, the records show another 
Essex County case. 

Public notice appeared that on September 5, 1776, a maritime court 
would be held to "try the justice" of the capture of the sloop Hanni- 
bal of about 60 tons burthen, lately commanded by one William Fitz- 
patrick, her cargo and appurtenances. The " cargo and appurte- 
nances," two negroes among the rest, seem to have been condemned 
and ordered for sale. On September 13th, the House of Representa- 
tives passed resolves forbidding the sale of two negro men lately taken 
on the high seas on board the sloop Hannibal and brought into this 

HIST. COLL. XXIV 7 



98 NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 

state as prisoners and advertised to be sold at Salem, the 17th instant, 
by public auction, in the following emphatic language : 

"Resolved, that the selling and enslaving the human species is a direct 
violation of the natural rights alike vested in all men by their Creator, 
and utterly inconsistent with the avowed principles on which this and 
the other United States have carried their struggle for liberty even to 
the last appeal, and therefore that all persons concerned with the said 
negroes be, and they hereby are, forbidden to sell them or in any man- 
ner to treat them otherwise than is already ordered for the treatment 
of prisoners of war taken in the same vessel or others in the like em- 
ploy and, if any sale of the said negroes shall be made, it hereby is de- 
clared null and void." 

The resolves were finally passed without substantial modification, 
on September 16, as appears from the following entries : — 

In Council, September 16, 1776. 
Read and concurred, as now taken into a new draft. Sent down 
for concurrence. 

John Avery, Depy. Secy. 



In the House of Representatives, 

Sept. 16, 1776. 



Read and concurred, 



J. Warren, Speaker. 



Consented to : 

Jer : Powell. Jabez Fisher. 

W. Sever. B. White. 

B. Greenleaf. Moses Gill. 

Caleb Cushing. Dan'l Hopkins. 

B. Chadbourn. Benj. Austin. 

John Whitcomb. Wm. Phillips. 

Eldad Taylor. D. Sewall. 

S. Holten. Dan'l Hopkins. 



If a comparison be made between the former and present 
condition of this class of people in the New England States 
it may be said that, unless liberty be reckoned as a com- 



NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 99 

pensation for many inconveniences and hardships, the for- 
mer condition of most of them was preferable to the present. 

They have generally left the country and resorted to the 
maritime towns excepting where we border on the state of 
New York. Here slavery having continued until very 
lately, it has replenished the towns near its bounds with 
deserting slaves, who were not worth reclaiming by their 
masters. Some are incorporated with the Indians of Cape 
Cod and Martha's Vineyard ; and the Indians are said to 
be improved by the mixture. Some are industrious and 
prudent, and a few have acquired property ; but too many 
are improvident and indolent, although a subsistence by 
simple labor is easily obtained. Those who were liberated 
from slavery, most of whom have now passed away, hav- 
ing been educated in families where they had not been 
used to provide for themselves in youth, they knew not 
how to do it in age. Having been accustomed to a plen- 
tiful and even luxurious mode of living in the houses of 
their masters, they were uncomfortable in their new sit- 
uation. They suffered, by the meanness of their lodging, 
and the insufficiency of their clothing, together with the 
severity of our winters, many infirmities and diseases. 
Those who served in families of the whites on wages, if 
steady and prudent, were the best fed, the best clad, and 
the most healthy ; but many of those who had families of 
their own to support were oppressed with poverty and its 
attendant miseries. It will be perceived that most of these 
remarks are only applicable to a generation which is now 
almost extinct. 

European adventurers to Africa had no other concern 
here than to procure cargoes of our rum to assist them in 
carrying on their business. A few only of our merchants 
were engaged in this kind of traffic. It required a large 
capital, and was considered peculiarly hazardous, though 



100 NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 

gainful. It was never supported by popular opinion ; and 
the voice of conscience was against it. A degree of in- 
famy was attached to the characters of those who were 
employed in it ; several of them in their last hours bitterly 
lamented their concern in it; and the friends of seamen, 
who had perished by the climate of Guinea, or in contests 
with the natives, became seriously prejudiced against the 
business. Reflecting persons were divided in their opin- 
ions on the lawfulness of their traffic in slaves. Samuel 
Sewall, chief justice of the province from 1718 to 1728, 
publicly protested against it, and wrote a pamphlet enti- 
tled, "Joseph sold, a memorial." Others disliked it from 
prudential considerations. Many conscientious persons, 
who would by no means have engaged directly in the trade 
to Africa, yet when negroes were brought hither, had no 
scruple to buy them ; because they supposed that an edu- 
cation in a land of gospel light was preferable to one in 
heathenish darkness. They contended that the buying of 
them and holding them in servitude might be justified by 
the example of Abraham, and other good men of antiquity ; 
and as his servants were circumcised, theirs were bap- 
tized. Laboring people, of the white complexion, com- 
plained of the blacks as intruders, and the vulgar reprobated 
them as the seed of Cain and wished them back in their 
own country. Not much was said, however, in a public 
and formal manner, till the people began to feel the weight 
of oppression from Great Britain. The inconsistency of 
pleading for their own rights and liberties, whilst they en- 
couraged the subjugation of others, was very apparent; 
and from this time both slavery and the slave trade be- 
gan to be discountenanced. 

There never was anything like a census of Massachu- 
setts before the year 1763 and then, being an unpopular 
measure, it was not \ery accurately taken. There was 



NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 101 

another in 1776 and a third in 1784, and in all of these, the 
number of whites stands distinguished from the number 
of blacks thus : 

Years. Whites. Blacks. Proportion. 

1763 235,810 5,214 45 to 1. 

1776 343,845 5,249 65 to 1. 

1784 353,133 4,377 80 to 1. 

In 1790 a census of the United States was made by or- 
der of the Federal Government ; the schedule sent out on 
that occasion contained three columns for free whites of 
several descriptions, which in the state of Massachusetts 
including Maine amounted to 469,326, a fourth for all 
other free persons, and a fifth for slaves. There being 
none put into the last column it became necessary to put 
the blacks with the Indians into the fourth column and the 
amount was 6,001. Of this number it is supposed that 
the blacks were upwards of 4,000 ; and of the remaining 
2,000, many were a mixed breed between Indians and 
blacks. If we reckon the blacks at 5,000, their propor- 
tion to the whites at that time was as 1 to 93. It is sup- 
posed that slaves were more numerous before 1763 than 
at that time, because, in the two preceding wars, many of 
them enlisted either into the army, or on board vessels of 
war, with a view to procure their freedom. Prince Hall, 
an intelligent black man who died some years ago, in 
1795, considered the slaves as being most numerous about 
the year 1745. The proportion to the whites, then, has 
been estimated at 1 to 40. The winter here was always 
unfavorable to the African constitution. For this reason 
white laborers were preferable to blacks, and as whites 
were more numerous, there was not much encouragement 
to the importation of blacks, nor were they ever so pro- 
lific here as the whites. In the maritime towns blacks 
were more numerous than in the country, and Boston gen- 



102 NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 

erally contained nearly one-fourth part of the whole num- 
ber of them. Excepting such tradesmen as rope makers, 
anchor smiths, and ship carpenters, who employ a great 
many hands, scarcely any family had more than two ; some 
not more than one, and many none at all. In the coun- 
try towns, there were not more than three or four on a 
farm, except in one instance where the number was six- 
teen, and this was a distinguished singularity. The greater 
number of husbandmen preferred white to black laborers. 

Negro children were reckoned an incumbrance in a 
family ; and, when weaned, were given away. They have 
been publicly advertised in the newspapers to be given 
away. The condition of our slaves was far from rigor- 
ous. No greater labor was exacted of them than of 
white people. In general they were not able to perform 
so much. They always had the free enjoyment of the 
Sabbath as a day of rest. A house of correction, to which 
disorderly persons of all colors were sent, formed one ob- 
ject of terror to them, but to be sold to the West Indies 
or to Carolina was the highest punishment that could be 
threatened or inflicted. 

In the maritime towns, the negroes served either in fam- 
ilies or at mechanical employments ; and in either case 
they fared no worse than other persons of the same class. 
In the country they lived as well as their masters, and 
often sat down at the same table in the true style of re- 
publican equality. Persons of illiberal and tyrannical dis- 
positions would sometimes abuse them ; but in general 
their treatment was humane, especially if their own tem- 
pers were mild and peaceable. 

They were never enrolled in the militia, but, on days of 
military training and other seasons of festivity and espe- 
cially on the day of the annual election, they were indulged 
in such diversions as were agreeable to them. They were 
inventoried and taxed as personal estate and as such on the 



NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 103 

decease of their masters were at the disposal of his exec- 
utor or administrator. Such of them as were prudent and 
industrious purchased their freedom . Some were liberated 
by their masters ; but at one period there was a law against 
their manumission, unless their masters gave bonds for 
their maintenance in case of sickness or decrepitude, so 
that they might not become a burden to the public. 

Another law forbade them to be out in the streets after 
nine o'clock in the evening, on pain of being sent to the 
house of correction. They were forbidden to strike a white 
man on penalty of being sold out of the province. The 
marriage of blacks with whites was prohibited. If the 
man was white, a fine of five pounds was required of him ; 
and fifty pounds was the fine of the person officiating ; but 
the marriage was not annulled. But on a revision of this 
law, since the constitution of 1780, such marriages are de- 
clared absolutely void. 

Some of the owners of slaves were careful to instruct 
them in reading, and in the doctrines and duties of religion ; 
and there have been many instances, among the Africans 
here, of persons who have profited by these instructions, 
and have sustained a virtuous and exemplary character. 

Slavery has been abolished here by public opinion 
which began to be established about 1765. At the begin- 
ning of the controversy with Great Britain, several per- 
sons, who before had entertained sentiments opposed to the 
slavery of the blacks, then took occasion publicly to re- 
monstrate against the inconsistency of contending for their 
own liberty, and at the same time depriving other people 
of theirs. Pamphlets and newspaper essays appeared on 
the subject ; it often entered into the conversation of re- 
flecting people, and many, who had, without remorse, been 
the purchasers of slaves, condemned themselves, and re- 
tracted their former opinion. The Quakers were zealous 
against slavery and the slave trade, and by their means 



104 NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 

the writings of Anthony Benezet of Philadelphia, John 
Woodman of New Jersey and others, were spread through 
the country. Nathaniel Appleton and James Swan, mer- 
chants of Boston, and Doctor Benjamin Bush of Philadel- 
phia, distinguished themselves as writers on the side of 
liberty. Those on the other side generally concealed their 
names ; but their arguments were not suffered to rest long 
without an answer. The controversy began about the 
year 1766, and was renewed at various times till 1773, 
when it was very warmly agitated and became a subject 
of forensic disputation at the public commencement in Har- 
vard College. 

In 1767, an attempt was made by the legislature to dis- 
courage the slave trade. A bill was brought into the 
House of Representatives "to prevent the unnatural and 
unwarrantable custom of enslaving mankind and the im- 
portation of slaves into the province." In its progress it 
was changed to "an act for laying an impost on negroes 
imported." It was so altered and curtailed by the Coun- 
cil, then the upper house, that the other house was of- 
fended and would not concur, and thus it failed. Had 
it passed both houses in any form whatever, Governor 
Barnard would not have consented to it. In 1773, an- i 
other attempt of the same kind was made. It was grounded 
on a petition from the negroes, which was read in the as- 
sembly, June 23, and referred to the next session. In 
January, 1774, a bill was brought in, entitled "an act to 
prevent the importation of negroes, and others, as slaves 
into this province." It passed all the forms in the two 
houses and was laid before Governor Hutchinson for his 
consent, March 8. On the next day the assembly was pro- 
rogued after a morose message from the governor, between 
whom and the two houses there had been a warm contest 
on other subjects. The negroes had deputed a committee 
respectfully to solicit the governor's consent ; but he told 



NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 105 

Lhem that his instructions forbade it. His successor, Gen- 
eral Gage, gave them the same answer, when they waited 
jn him. 

The blacks had better success in the judicial courts. 
A. pamphlet, containing the case of a negro who had ac- 
companied his master from the West Indies to England, 
md had there sued for and obtained his freedom, was re- 
printed here ; and this encouraged several negroes to sue 
their masters for their freedom, and for recompense for 
their service after they had attained the age of twenty-one 
years. The first trial of this kind was in 1770. The ne- 
groes collected money among themselves to carry on the 
suit and it terminated favorably for them. Other suits 
were instituted between that time and the revolution and 
the juries invariably gave their verdict in favor of liberty. 
The pleas on the part of the masters were, that the ne- 
groes were purchased in open market, and bills of sale 
were produced in evidence ; that the laws of the province 
recognized slavery as existing in it, by declaring that no 
person should manumit his slave without giving bond for 
bis maintenance, etc. On the part of the blacks it was 
pleaded, that the royal charter expressly declared all 
persons, born or residing in the province, to be as free as 
the king's subjects in Great Britain ; that by the laws of 
England no man could be deprived of his liberty but by 
the judgment of his peers ; that the laws of the province 
respecting an evil existing, and attempting to mitigate or 
regulate it, did not authorize it ; and on some occasions 
the plea was that, though the slavery of the parents be ad- 
mitted, yet no disability of that kind could descend to 
children. During the revolutionary war, public opinion 
was so strongly in favor of the abolition of slavery that, 
in some of the country towns, votes were passed in town- 
meetings that they would have no slaves among them; 

HIST. COLL. XXIV. 7* 



106 NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 

and that they would not exact of masters any bonds for 
the maintenance of liberated blacks if they should become 
incapable of suppporting themselves. 

In New Hampshire, those blacks who enlisted into the 
army for three years were entitled to the same bounty as 
the whites. This bounty their masters received as the 
price of their liberty, and then delivered up their bills of 
sale, and gave them a certificate of manumission and those 
who survived the three years' service were free. 

" The present constitution of Massachusetts was estab- 
lished in 1780. The first article of the declaration of 
rights asserts that all men are born free and equal. This 
was inserted not merely as a moral or political truth, but 
with a particular view to establish the liberation of the 
negroes on a general principle, and so it was understood 
by the people at large ; but some doubted whether this 
were sufficient. Many of the blacks taking advantage of 
the public opinion and of this general assertion in the bill 
of rights, asked their freedom and obtained it. Others 
took it without leave. Some of the aged and infirm thought 
it most prudent to continue in the families where they had 
always been well used, and experience proved that they 
acted rightly. 

"In 1781, at the court in Worcester county an indictment 
was found against a white man for assaulting, beating and 
imprisoning a black. He was tried at the Supreme Judi- 
cial Court in 1783. His defence was that the black was 
his slave, and that the beating, etc., was the necessary re- 
straint and correction of the master. He was found guilty 
and fined forty shillings. This decision was a mortal 
wound to slavery in Massachusetts." 

The state of New Hampshire established its constitution 
in 1783 ; and in the first article of the declaration of rights, 
it is asserted that all men are born equally free and hide- 



NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 107 

pendent. The construction there put on this clause is 
that all who have been born since the constitution are 
free, but that those who were in slavery before are not 
liberated by it. By reason of this construction so con- 
trary to every sound principle, the blacks in that state in 
the census of 1790 are distinguished into free and slaves, 
there being no Indians residing within those limits. In 
the same census, no slaves are set down to Massachusetts. 

Our laws place the blacks upon an equality with the 
whites in every respect. The same provision is made by 
the public for the education of their children as for those 
of the whites. We have seen in our public schools in this 
town colored males and females who have maintained an 
equal standing with white children of the same age. In 
some instances they have excelled so as generally to be at 
the top of their classes . 

There is nothing in our constitution which disqualifies 
them from electing or being elected to office, if they have 
the other qualifications required which maybe obtained by 
blacks as well as by whites. Some of them exercise the 
privilege of voting. Instances of the election of a black to 
any public office are very rare. Many years ago one was 
chosen to be the clerk of the town where he resided. He 
was a man of good sense and morals, and had a good school 
education. The blacks by the law of the United States 
are exempted from enrollment in the militia. In the time 
of Shay's insurrection, 1786, they offered their service to 
governor JBowdoin to go against the insurgents, to the num- 
ber of 700, but the council did not advise sending them. 
With respect to the harmony of social intercourse between 
the blacks and whites, I will quote from Prince Hall, who 
has been before referred to with reference to the date of 
1795. "Harmony in general (says he) prevails between 
us as citizens, for the good law of the land does oblige 



108 NEGRO SLAVERY IN MASSACHUSETTS. 

every one to live peaceably with all his fellow-citizens, 
let them be black or white. We stand on a level, there- 
fore ; no preeminence can be claimed on either side. As 
to our associating, there are here (that is in Boston) a 
great number of worthy good men and good citizens, that 
are not ashamed to take an African by the hand ; but yet 
there are to be seen the weeds of pride, envy, tyranny 
and scorn, in this garden of peace, liberty and equality." 
The candor of this dark statement of Mr. Prince Hall 
cannot be called in question. There are everywhere some 
who are prone to forget that of one blood the great Crea- 
tor made all the nations of the earth. 

Prince Hall was honored by being made grand master 
of a lodge of free masons, composed wholly of blacks, 
and distinguished by the name of the African Lodge. It 
was begun in 1775 while the town of Boston was garri- 
soned by British troops ; some of whom had a lodge and 
initiated a number of negroes. After the peace they sent 
to England and procured a charter, under the authority 
of the Duke of Cumberland, and signed by the Earl of 
Effingham. In 1795 the lodge consisted of thirty persons, 
and care was taken that none but those of a good moral 
character were admitted. 



INSCRIPTIONS FROM THE OLD BURYING 
GROUND IN DODGE'S ROW (NORTH BEVERLY). 1 



COPIED BY WELLINGTON POOL, AUGUST 18, 1882. 



Here lies Buried | the body of | M r Phineas 
Dodge | who departed | this life July, | 19 th 1759 in 
| the 72 year. | of 2 

Here lies y e body of | Mr s . Martha Dodge | y e 
Wife of Mr. | Phinehas Dodge | who died March | 
y e 31 1724 Aged | 39 years. 

In Memory of | Capt. Jacob Dodge, | who died Dec. 
13 th 1792 | in the 77 th Year | of his Age. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Dodge | Relict of j Capt. Jacob 
Dodge, | died Oct. 20, 1806, | M. 80. 

She died in hopes of a glourious Immortality. 

Here lies Buried | the body of | Mr. Amos Dodge 
| who was born I August 28 1717 | and departed | 
this life Feb. 1{Y 27 | 1755 in the 38 | year of his age. 

In | Memory of | Mrs. Hannah Dodge | wife of Lien. 

| William Dodge, | who died June 6, | 1790 in the 28 

| year of her | Age. 

Pass on, my friends, dry up your tears 
I must lie here till Christ appears. 
Death is a debt to nature due 
I've paid the debt and so must you. 

In Memory of | Mrs. Jerusha Dodge | wife of Lieu. | 
William Dodge | who died | Sept. 15 1805. | M. 45 | 



J This ground lies a little south of the Wenham line, and has probably been used 
quite as much by the people of Wenham Neck, as by the people of "the Row." See 
appendix for the deed of conveyance. 

2 Crumbled off. 

(109) 



110 



INSCRIPTIONS FROM GRAVESTONES 



by her side is Axor | her son who died ] Oct. 4 1805. | 

2Et 9 years. 

Weep not for me, my pains are o'er, 
We soon shall meet to part no more. 

Here lyes y e body of | M r s Elizabeth Dodge | Wife 
of Mr. Parker | Dodge who died | Decem r y e 25 1715 
| Aged 24 years | Blessed are they y t j Di in y e 
Lord. 




As you are 
So ware we 
As we are 
You ; Shall be.' 



Here lyes y e body | of Samuel Dodge | Sen 11 who 
departed I this life in Ipswich | Upon y e 4 th day of j 
Decem ek Anno Dom. | 1705 in y e | 61 st Year of His 
Age. 

Here Lyeth y e body of Mary | Dodge wife to Sam 11 
Dodge who | died Aug 8t y e 6 th 1717 | Aged 73 years. 

Here lies y e | Body of Ame | Dodge who | Died 
March y e | 29 th 1719 in ye | 36 th y r of Her Age. 

3 Footstone. 






IN DODGE'S ROW (NORTH BEVERLY). 



Ill 



Here lies y e | body of Mr. | Josiah Dodge | who 

DIED JANU- I ARY Y E 19 1714 | AGED 50 YEARS | If WE 

believe I as Christ hath said | Al shall arise | y t 

HERE ARE LAID. 4 

Here Lyeth y e body | of Sarah y e wife | Formerly to 
Josiah | Dodge who March | y e 17 th died 1729-30 | in y e 
60 th year of | her Age. 





Here Lyes y e 


Also Mary 


Body of M r 


y e Wife of Rich ld 


Richard Dodg e 


Dodge Lyes 


who died y e 


here who die d 


dy of Appril 

13 1705 Aged 

63 years. 


Nov ffir 2 1716 
Aged 75 years. 



Here Lieth y e Body of | M r Andrew Dodge | Who 
died February y e | 17 th 1747-8 in y e 72 nd | year of his 
Age. 

Here lies the | Body of Sarah Dod | Ge the Wife 
of And I rew Dodge Ho die | d in y e 6 of June | in 
y e 60 th year | of Har Age. | 1734. 

Here lyes the | bodi of Hannah | Fisk the wife 
of I Andrew Dodge | Ho died in the 30 | year of Har 
Age I December 2 d | 1703. 

Here lieth | T 5 body of | anna Dodge y e | daugh- 



* Lies on the ground. 



s Crumbled off. 



112 INSCRIPTIONS FROM GRAVESTONES 

ter of Andrew | Dodge that he had | by his first wife | 
she died Aprel y e 19 | 1704. 

Note. The above is on the headstone and the following is on the tbotstone to 
the same grave. 

Here | Lieth y e body of | Hannah Dodge | She died in 
ye | 5 fift year of har | Age Aprel y e 19 | 1704. 

y e Body of 
)odge wife to 
ob Dodge who D'd 6 
)ecember y e 19 th 1740 | in y e 29 th year of her Age J Also 
Jacob their son died y e | 29 th Aged All days. 

Here lies y e body of Mr. | Barnabas Dodge who 
died | October y e 11 1739 IN y e 33 year | of his age 
with his 4 chil n | Uiz : Martha Lucy Hephzi | Rogers 
Dodges Martha died | Decem br y e 19 1736, in y e 8 

YEAR | OF HER AGE LUCY DIED DeCEM r | Y e 14 1736 IN 

y e 5 year of her | age hephzi died january y e 27 | 
1737 in y e 3 year of Age | Rogers died July y k 

26, | 1736 AGED 14 ( ?) days. t 

au to 
And M rs 
(nee Dodge 7 
Who died Janur y | y e 22 d 1725-6, j Aged 8 weeks. 

Here lies | y e body of | Mr. Richard | Dodge y e 3 d 
| who died July | y e 7 1739 | 8 d 70 years 

Here lies y e | Bodey of Mrs. | Martha Dodge | y k 
Wife of Mr. | Richar 8 Dodge | y e 3 d Who | died Feb- 
ruary | y e 29 17 8 in I y e 69 y e of | Her Age. 

6 The upper left hand corner of the stone is gone. Wenham Church Records 
give the names Sarah wife of Jacob Dodge. 

7 The upper left hand corner of the stone is gone. Wenham Church Records 
give Prudence, daughter to Joseph and Prudence Dodge. 

8 Crumbled oil'. 



IN DODGE'S ROW (NORTH BEVERLY) 



113 



Here lies Buried | the Body of | Lieu 1 . Richard 
Dodge; | who departed this Life | May y e 11 th 1778, in 
y e | 75 th Year of His Age. 

Richard Son to 
9 Richard & M 
Dodge y* 
i ober y e 

Tabitha dau 9 | M r Richard and | M rs Mary Dodge | 
Died Febu ry the | 23 d 1727 in | her 2 nd year. 

P 9 udence dau* | M r Richard & M( rs ) | Mary Dodge 



died | Octo b | y< 



| In her 3 y(ear) 



Abraham Son to | Mr Richard and M rs | Mary Dodge 
Died I Sep tmr 25 th 1725 



Aged 3 Months, 



2 Daughters of Mr. Richard & 
M rs Mary Dodge 



Mary died y e 
9 th of Octo br 
1737 in her 
8 year 



Mercy died 
Octo br y e 8 th 

1737 in 
her 5 th year. 



In memory of | Mrs. Lydia Dodge | wife of | Mr. 
Nicholas Dodge | who died | Sep. 27 1805. | M. 30 | 



9 Crumbled off. 

10 Wenham Church records give 1737. 



HIST. COLL. 



XXIV 



114 INSCRIPTIONS FROM GRAVESTONES 

By her side is Lucy there da | lighter who died sep. 15 

1805 | Mt 18 months. 

Farewell my dear husband, saith she 
Now from your kind bosom I leap ; 
With Jesus my bridegroom to be, 
My flesh in the tomb for to sleep. 

Here lies Buried | the Body of | M es Prudence | 
Dodge wife of M k | William Dodge | who died Au- 
gust | ye 5 th 1737 in y e 57 th I Year of her Age. 

Here Lyeth y e body j of Tabatha Goolsmith | u Zacheus 
Goolsmith | who died October | y e 8 1796 in 17 | 

year of her Age. 

12 ndrew 
Dodge 
1747-8 

Here Lies | y e body of Marth a | Edwards dafter 
| of Mr. Joseph | Edwards died | in August 1726 | 
in y e 2 year j of her age. 

In Memory of | Mr. Jacob Edwards Jun r | who de- 
parted this Life | Feb. 1 st 1800 in the 27 th | year of his 

age. 

Weep not my friends dry up your tears 
I must lie here till Christ appears. 

He when alive all vice did shun, 
Straight in the path of virtue run ; 
And now he reaps a full reward 
In endless glory with the Lord. 

In memory of | Mr. Abraham Edwards, | who died | 
Nov. 17, 1800 | Mt. 52. 

Farewell conflicting hopes and fears 
Where lights and shades alternate dwell 
How bright the unchanging morn appears 
Farewell, inconstant world farewell. 

11 Wife of Zaeheus Goldsmith, jr., in Wenham church records. 

12 Broken stone lying on the ground. 



IN DODGE'S ROW (NORTH BEVERLY). 115 



jEMIMa 
DoDGe 13 




i A I M h I n c 
body of REb 
ACKER dod 
GE 1S 



H I 



14 



IV 



14 



13 



13 Common slabatonea. 
"Illegible 



116 INSCRIPTIONS FROM GRAVESTONES 

In Memory of | Mrs. Prudence, | wife of | Mr. Abra- 
ham Edwards, | & Mr. Joseph Langdall | who died | 
Nov. 2, 1832, aged 72 years & 6 mos. 

Write blessed are the dead which die in Lord, from henceforth, 
yea saith the spirit; that they may rest from their labours, and their 
works do follow them. 

They die in Jesus and are blest, 

How kind their slumbers are, 

From sufferings and from sins released, 

And freed from every snare. 

BetseyCleves I Died | June 9, 1851. | Aged 66 yr's | 
William Edwards j Died at Plattsburg, N. Y. | Nov. 24, 
1813, | Aged 21 y'rs | Col. | Jacob D. Edwards, | Died 
at Boston, Mass. | June 24, 1847, | Aged 47 y'rs | Daugh- 
ter & sons of | Abraham & Prudence | Edwards. 

Jonah | DodGe 15 | SARah | DodGe 15 . 

APPENDIX. 

[Copy.] 

To All People, to whom these Presents may come, We Jonathan 
Dodge, Weaver, Edward Dodge Husbandman & Mark Dodge Hus- 
bandman All of Beverly in the County of Essex within His Majesties 
Province of y e Massachusetts Bay in New England Send Greeting, 
Know ye that whereas our Honoured Grandfather Richard Dodge late 
of said Beverly deceased did in his lifetime Set apart & appoint a cer- 
tain piece of land lying in said Beverly for a Burying place for himself 
& posterity, Which Land is bounded as followeth, beginning at a lit* 
tie Shrub Appletree, & so running Easterly, Six Pole & five foot, 
and then turning Northerly Thirteen Pole, & then turning Westerly 
four Pole near the Plogh'd way, and then running Southerly fourteen 
Pole to the Bounds first mention'd : Which parcel of Land has been 
ever since used by ye Descendants of said Richard Dodge & others for 
a Burying-Place, We therefore ye said Jonathan Dodge Edward Dodge, 
& Mark Dodge do by these presents confirm & establish the said Priv- 
iledge of burying in y e said Land unto Andrew Dodge of Beverly, Phin- 
ehas Dodge & Nehemiah Dodge Josiah & Thomas Dodge all of Wenham, 
Robert Dodge and others, the children of Ebenezer Dodge late of Bev- 

w On common slabstones. 



IN DODGE'S ROW (NORTH BEVERLY). 117 

erly clec d , being ye Descendants of our late Uncle John Dodge De- 
ceased : Richard Dodge of Ipswich, Daniel Dodge & William Dodge, 
both of Wenham, being y e sons of our late Uncle Richard Dodge de- 
ceased, Parker & Samuel Dodge, both of Ipswich y e sons of our late 
Uncle Samuel Dodge deceased, Joseph Dodge, Jonah Dodge, Elisha 
Dodge & Nathaniel Dodge all of Beverly, y e sons of our late Uncle 
Joseph Dodge deceased, unto them & their Posterity forever, as also 
unto our Neighbours, Thomas Edwards & Benj'a Edwards both of 
Wenham, unto them, and their Posterity forever. To Have and to Hold 
together with ourselves & our Posterity the said parcel or piece of Land 
for the use abovementioned, & for that only for ever; without any let 
molestation or hindrance from us or from any hereafter claiming by 
or under us, together with a convenient way to y e said Burying Place. 
In Witness whereof we have hereunto set our hands & Seals this 
24th day of February Anno Domini 1730-1. In y« 4th year of y e reign 
of King George y e Second, of Great Brittain, France, & Ireland &c. 
Signed, Sealed, & Delivered 

In presence of The words between L. 17, & 18, Robert Dodge 
& others ye children of Ebenezer Dodge late of 

t Joseph Edwards Beverly dec'd were interlined before Sealing & 
Delivery. 
Excepting The Apple Jonathan Dodge [seal] 
John Dodge Trees within The Bur- 

ing place before Sign- Edward Dodge Tseal] 
Richard Dodge ing and Sealing 16 

Mark Dodge [seal] 
Essex Sc March y e 13 th , 1731 (2 
Jonathan Dodge Edward Dodge and 
Mark Dodge Acknowledged this Instrument 
to be their Act act and Deed before. 

Symonds Epes Justice Peace. 
An Agreement made this Twenty fourth clay of February In the year 
of our Lord one Thousand Seven Hundred & Thirty, Thirty one Be- 
tween Andrew Dodge, Phinehas Dodge, Nehemiah Dodge, Josiah 
Dodge Thomas Dodge & Robert Dodge, y e son & Grandsons of John 
Dodge, late of Beverly in y e county of Essex in the Province of y e Mass- 
achusetts-bay in New England ; Richard Dodge, Daniel Dodge & Wil- 
liam Dodge sons of Richard Dodge late of Wenham in y e County and 
Province aforesaid; Jonathan Dodge, Edward Dodge, & Mark Dodge 
of s'd Beverly sons of Edward Dodge late of s'd Beverly ; Parker Dodge 
& Samuel Dodge, sons of Samuel Dodge late of Ipswich in the County 
& province aforesaid deceased ; Joseph Dodge, Jonah Dodge, Elisha 

16 In another hand. 



118 INSCRIPTIONS FROM DODGE'S ROW. 

Dodge, & Nathaniel Dodge Sons of Joseph Dodge late of said Beverly 
deceased; Thomas Edwards & Benjamin Edwards, both of said Wen- 
ham, being Seven Families so to be considered, testifleth, That They 
mutually engage by these presents to build a good Sufficient Stone- 
wall, about the Burying-Place in Beverly Belonging to y e s'd Dodge's 
& Edwards' within Fifteen Months from the day of ye date hereof: 
Each family to set up Five Pole & Five Foot of said stone wall within 
that Term of Fifteen months on Penalty of forfeiting The Sum of Forty 
Shillings to be paid to any of y e other families, which shall prosecute 
the default, we do oblige likwise our Selves & our Posterity, to re- 
pair annually the Defects & Ruins, that may happen in said Stone- 
wall, Each family its proportion, on penalty of the above mentioned 
forfeiture, as also to maintain a convenient, & decent Gate to the Said 
Burying Place on Penalty of forfeiting what may be thought reasonable 
by three judicious & indifferent Persons, to those of us who shall be at 
y e cost & charge of setting it up & keeping it in repair. 

In witness whereof we have hereunto set our hands & seals the day 
& year first above-written. 
Signed Sealed & Delivd. His 

In presence of Tho s . V Edwards [seal] 

Thomas Dodge Andrew Dodge [seal] mark 

John Dodge [jr.?] Jonah Dodge [seal] Rich** Dod [seal] 

[seal] Elisha Dodge [seal] Dan". Dodge [seal] 
Rice Knowlton [seal] Jonathan Dodge [seal] William Dodge [seal] 
Nehemiah Dodge [.seal] Edward Dodge [seal] Josiah Dodge [seal] 
Robert Dodge [seal] Mark Dodge [seal] Thomas Dodge [seal] 
Richard Dodgejr. [seal] Parker Dodge [seal] Benjamin Edwards 

[seal] Samuel Dodge [seal] [seal] 

" The agreement for fencing the burying Place." 17 

COPY OF DEEDS OF ADDITIONAL LAND FOR THE 

BURYING GROUND, RECORDED IN THE ESSEX 

REGISTRY OF DEEDS. 



Know all men by these presents, That we Joseph 
Langdell of Wenham in the county of Essex and Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts yeoman, and William Morgan of 
New Boston in the county of Hillsborough and state of 
New Hampshire cordwainer and Esther his wife in her 

17 Endorsement on the back. 



COPY OF DEEDS. 119 

right, and Ezra Langdell yeoman and Kebecca Codman 
widow both of Mount Vernon in said county of Hillsbor- 
ough, do for and in consideration of the sum of Fifty-three 
dollars and twelve cents lawful Money to us paid by Syl- 
vester Wilkins housewright, Benjamin Edwards 2d cord- 
wainer, John Edwards junior yeoman, Ezra Edwards 
yeoman and Asa B. Edwards yeoman all of Beverly in said 
county of Essex, and Nicholas Dodge yeoman, William 
Dodge yeoman, John T. Dodge yeoman, Isaac Dodge 
Gentleman, Downing Gentle yeoman, William Brown 
yeoman Abraham Dodge yeoman, Nehemiah Standley 
yeoman, Timothy Higgins mariner, Abraham Knowlton 
yeoman, John Cleaves yeoman, Simon Dodge yeoman, 
Benjamin Edwards yeoman, Jacob Dodge yeoman, Nich- 
olas Dodge junior, gentleman, Peter Dodge yeoman, Aaron 
Lee, yeoman, Sally Hooker widow, and John Dodge yeo- 
man of Hamilton in the county of Essex, all of Wenham 
in said county of Essex, excepting said John Dodge, in 
equal proportion, the receipt whereof we do hereby ac- 
knowledge, do hereby give, grant, bargain, sell, convey 
and confirm unto the said Sylvester Wilkins, Benjamin 
Edwards 2d, John Edwards, Ezra Edwards, Asa B. Ed- 
wards, Nicholas Dodge, William Dodge, John T. Dodge, 
Isaac Dodge, Downing Gentle, William Brown, Abraham 
Dodge, Nehemiah Standley, Timothy Higgins, Abraham 
Knowlton, John Cleaves, Simon Dodge, Benjamin Ed- 
wards, Jacob Dodge, Nicholas Dodge, junior, Peter Dodge, 
Aaron Lee, Sally Hooker, and John Dodge in equal pro- 
portions as tenants in common and their respective heirs 
and assigns forever, a certain piece of land for a burying 
yard situated in Beverly aforesaid containing about eighty- 
five poles of land and the said land is bounded as follows, 
viz. ; beginning at the southwesternmost corner thereof 
against the southeasternmost corner of the old Burying 



120 COPY OF DEEDS. 

yard, so called, thence running northerly by the said old 
burying yard there measuring ten poles, thence running 
easterly by the land of the said grantors there measuring 
eight poles, thence running southerly by land of the heirs of 
Asa Dodge deceased there measuring ten poles, thence run- 
ning westerly by land of said grantors there measuring 
nine poles to the bounds first mentioned, with all the privi- 
leges and appurtenances thereto belonging. 

Excepting and reserving to the said Joseph Langdell his 
heirs and assigns forever one undivided twenty-fifth part 
of the said granted and conveyed premises to be held in 
common with the aforesaid grantees for the same purposes 
aforesaid, To have and to hold the said granted and 
bargained premises with the privileges and appurtenances 
thereof to them the said grantees aforenamed as tenants in 
common and to their respective heirs and assigns forever 
to their own use and behoof forever, excepting the reserve 
as aforesaid. And we the said Joseph Langdell, William 
Morgan, Esther Morgan, Rebecca Codman, and Ezra 
Langdell respectively for ourselves our heirs, executors 
and administrators do covenant with the grantees afore- 
named their respective heirs and assigns that we are law- 
fully seized in fee of the premises, that they are free of all 
incumbrances and that we have good right to sell and con- 
vey the same to the said grantees aforenamed, to hold as 
aforesaid ; and that we will and our respective heirs, ex- 
ecutors and administrators shall warrant and defend the 
same to the said grantees beforenamed their respective 
heirs and assigns forever, against the lawful claims and 
demands of all persons excepting the said reserve to said 
Joseph aforesaid. And I Rebecca Dodge of said Beverly 
widow, in consideration of two dollars to me paid by the 
aforenamed grantees, the receipt whereof I do hereby ac- 
knowledge, I do hereby grant, release, remise and forever 



COPY OF DEEDS. 



121 



quit claim unto the aforenamed grantees respectively their 
heirs and assigns forever all my right, title, and interest, 
estate, use, improvement, claims and demands whatever 
that I now have in and to the aforedescribed granted 
premises. 

In witness whereof we the said Joseph Langdell, 
William Morgan, Esther Morgan, Ezra Langdell, Eebecca 
Cod man and Rebecca Dodge have hereunto set our hands 
and seals this twelfth day of December in the year of our 
Lord one thousand eight hundred and twelve. 

N. B., there was eleven words interlined before signed 
and sealed. 

Signed, sealed and delivered in presence of us } 



Emme Smith 
Jonathan Smith 
James Ray 
Mark D. Perkins 



by said Joseph ) £ 

Langdell $ * 

) for William Morgan, Esther Morgan, 

,* Ezra Langdell and Rebecca Codman. 

Joseph Langdell [Seal] 

[Seal] 

[Seal] 



William Morgan 



Morgan 



[Essex Reg. Deeds, 237- 



her 

Esther x 
mark 

Ezra Langdell [Seal] 

Rebecca Codman [Seal] 

■204.] [Seal] 



Know all men by these presents, That I Joseph 
Langdell of Wenham in the county of Essex and Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts yeoman, and Sylvester Wil- 
kins of Beverly in the county and commonwealth aforesaid 
housewright, and William Morgan of New Boston in the 
county of Hillsborough and State of New Hampshire cord- 
wainer, and Esther his wife in her right, in consideration 
of the sum of nine dollars 52 cents paid to us by Benja- 
min Edwards of Wenham aforesaid and twenty-four others 



HIST. COLL. 



XXIV 



8* 



122 COPY OF DEEDS. 

of the proprietors of the burying ground in Beverly being 
tenants in common,' the receipt whereof we do hereby ac- 
knowledge, do hereby give, grant, sell and convey unto 
the said proprietors severally and their heirs and assigns, 
a certain tract of land in said Beverly containing fifteen 
rods and three fourths, bounded southerly by the highway 
half a rod, then easterly by land formerly of Asa B. 
Edwards and the heirs of Asa Dodge deceased ; then 
northerly to the burying ground, thence westerly by the 
said burying ground, and the heirs of Mark Dodge de- 
ceased and the said Sylvester Wilkins to the bound first 
mentioned. To have and to hold the same to the said 
proprietors their heirs and assigns to their use and benefit 
forever. And we do covenant with the said proprietors 
their heirs and assigns that we are lawfully seized in fee 
of the premises ; that they are free of all incumbrances ; 
that we have good right to sell and convey the same to 
the said proprietors and their heirs and assigns ; and that 
we will warrant and defend the same to the said proprie- 
tors and their heirs and assigns against the lawful claims 
of all persons. In witness whereof we have hereunto 
set our hands and seals this thirteenth day of June one 
thousand eight hundred and fifteen. 
Signed, Sealed and delivered in presence of us 
Israel Friend Isaac Woodberry junr. 

Joseph Langdell . . [seal] 
Sylvester Wilkins . . [ " ] 

[ " ] 

[ " ] 

Essex ss. July 6, 1815. Then the within named Joseph 

Langdell and Sylvester Wilkins personally acknowledged 

the above instrument to be their free act and deed. 

before me Isaac Woodbury junr. Justice of Peace. 

Essex ss. Received July 27, 1824, recorded and examined 

by Amos Choate Reg. [Essex Reg. Deeds, 236 — 70.] 






SKETCH OF MRS. WILLIAM JARVIS 

OF 

WEATHERSFIELD, VERMONT. 



BY MRS. MARY PEPPERELL SPARHAWK JARVIS CUTTS. 



EDITED BY HER GRANDSON 
CECIL HAMPDEN CUTTS HOWARD. 



PART I. 

Mrs. Anna Bailey Bartlett Jarvis was the eldest daugh- 
ter of the Hon. Bailey Bartlett, of Haverhill, Massachu- 
setts, who commenced life as an importing merchant ; the 
same business in which his father had been engaged. 

The following extract is from a biographical notice of 
him. 

"Living in the most interesting period of the Revolu- 
tion, Mr. Bartlett early mingled in political life. He was 
one of the earliest and most intimate friends of the ven- 
erable John Adams, and a fellow boarder with him and 
Samuel Adams in Philadelphia on the 4th of July, 1776, 
and was present at Congress Hall when the declaration of 
Independence was first proclaimed. He represented the 
town of Haverhill, in the house of Representatives in 
1783, and the county of Essex in the Senate in 1789. 

On the 1st of July, 1789, he was appointed High Sheriff 
of Essex Co. Governor Hancock presented him the com- 
mission in person, and stated to him that he did it with 
peculiar pleasure, as it was the only nomination during 
his administration that met the unanimous concurrence of 
his Council. He held this office for forty years, until his 
death in 1830. He was kind and indulgent almost to a 
fault ; and his purse often paid the exactions of an unfeel- 

(123) 



124 MRS. WILLIAM JAR VIS 

ing creditor, rather than suffer a poor debtor to be impris- 
oned. In all eases of difficulty he was firm, fearless, 
immovable. Such was the public life of this amiable, 
honest, faithful, unostentatious, public servant." 

In 1786 he married Miss Peggy Leonard White of 
Newburyport, a lineal descendant of Peregrine White, the 
first white child born at Plymouth, after the landing of 
the Pilgrims. She was a refined and beautiful young lady 
of seventeen, fair as a lily, with the rose on her cheek, 
blue eyes, fine auburn hair, and cherry lips. 

Her elder sister was said to be even more beautiful than 
herself. When only fifteen, a wealthy gentleman of Nova 
Scotia, Mr. Hazen, met her at Newburyport, fell in love 
with her, and offered himself in marriage. Her mother 
thought her too young for an engagement, and decidedly 
refused the offer, though she had no objection to the gen- 
tleman. He waited patiently a year, then renewed his 
proposals and was accepted. They were afterwards mar- 
ried. 

Before his marriage, Mr. Bartlett made large additions 
in more modern style to his deceased father's house, in 
which he resided. It was situated on the banks of the 
Merrimac river, with a southern aspect, and on the site 
of the house where the Johnsons had lived, when taken 
captive by the Indians. 

Strange legends hung around the old mansion. The 
red man had been there with his tomahawk thirsting for 
blood ; a mother had been tomahawked in the garden, but 
preserved her infant by secreting it under her clothing, 
where after the massacre was over it was found living. 
Two of Mr. Johnson's children were saved by a faithful 
domestic, by hiding them under a wash-tub in the cellar. 
The daughter thus rescued married Dr. Bailey of the 
British Navy, and was the grandmother of the Hon. Bai- 
ley Bartlett. 



OF WEATHERSFIELD, VERMONT. 125 

This old family mansion was three stories high ; the 
upper stories having gable windows of the ancient pat- 
tern, which opened upon a balcony, that extended across 
the front, and commanded an extensive view of the smooth 
and beautiful river. It was built of brick, painted straw- 
color. Woodbines clambered over it in luxuriant growth, 
and in later years half covered the front of the house. 
They climbed to the very roof and fell in graceful festoons 
over the balcony, veiling it from observation in the street 
below. Here the birds resorted to build their nests ; the 
children played "hide and seek" and other games, and 
lovers whispered their vows and mutual sympathies. To 
this abode Mr. Bartlett brought his fair young bride ; 
whose ladylike and elegant deportment, hospitality, grace 
and courtesy, rendered her home attractive to her hus- 
band and to a large circle of friends. 

As she ripened into maturer years she became a true 
lady of the olden school. Her taste, love of neatness and 
order, and devoted piety, exerted a strong influence over 
her children and household through life. 

Mr. Bartlett's sister Elizabeth, a gentle, amiable and 

lovely girl of twenty, had married Col. Nathaniel Spar- 

ihawk, the grandson of the hero of Louisburg, General 

i Sir William Pepperell. She died two years after her 

; marriage, leaving an infant daughter, Mary Pepperell, who 

I was born in 1780. Mr. Bartlett was warmly attached to 

i his sister, and as Col. Sparhawk had several children by 

| his first marriage, Mr. Bartlett succeeded in persuading 

her father to permit little Mary to be placed under the 

care of her grandmother Bartlett, where she was cherished 

with the fondest love by her uncle and grandmother. 

As years developed her character, she became remark- 
able for her sweet, kind and conscientious disposition, and 
for her fondness for study and self improvement. After 



126 MRS. WILLIAM JAR VIS 

the death of her grandmother she lived with her uncle 
and aunt Bartlett, and the latter loved her as a younger 
sister. A remarkably strong attachment was formed be- 
tween them, which was manifested by the niece in untir- 
ing acts of kindness and attention towards her aunt and 
children. They united with Rev. Mr. Abbott's church 
together in 1802. 

A story is related of Mrs. Bartlett which illustrates the 
elaborate manner in which the ladies dressed their hair at 
that period. In her early married life she went to Boston 
to visit some friends and to attend Commencement at 
Harvard College; then a grand dress occasion, as her 
brother was to graduate that year. . 

The barbers were so much in demand that not one could 
be obtained on the morning of Commencement day, and 
Mrs. Bartlett was under the necessity of having her hair 
dressed the evening before, so that, when the pile of head 
gear had once been completed, she was obliged to obtain 
what rest she could in an easy chair through the night. 
This proves that elegant ladies were in those days, as in the 
present period, swayed by the goddess of fashion as well, 
though perhaps not to the same extent, as they did not 
wear so many flounces and furbelows, and their rich and 
superb brocades were kept for gala days only, and 
handed down from mother to daughter. They wore im- 
mense calashes, made of green silk and whalebone, to ride 
in, and for covering the tall and stately head dress. The 
calash was easily taken off and folded up. They also 
carried very large fans, partly as a screen ; and in travel- 
bug wore green silk tissue veils wrapped closely over the 
face to protect the complexion from sun and wind. In 
full dress they wore a square low-necked polonaise with 
handsome lace around the neck and a large showy neck- 
lace, or string of beads. The sleeve was tight at the el- 



OF WEATHERfFIELD, VERMONT. 127 

bow, then a deep ruffle of the same material as the dress, 
and a deep fall of rich lace under it which gracefully veiled 
the arm in part. The polonaise was open in front, and 
displayed either a rich quilted satin petticoat, or a skirt of 
the same material as the dress. 

In 1787, Mr. and Mrs. Bartlett's first child was born 
and was named Anna Bailey. After this their family 
increased "rapidly. Eliza, Margaret, Sarah and Harriet, 
were added to it. Then their first son was born, Bailey. 
Then Catherine Leonard, Edwin, Abby Osgood, Charles 
Leonard, Mary Augusta, Francis , and finally, Louisa 
Amelia, in Oct., 1809. Two children died in infancy. 
Thirteen lived to grow up. In the infancy of her first 
children Mrs. Bartlett was highly favored in securing the 
services of an intelligent and faithful American girl named 
Dennis, who identified herself with the interests of her 
mistress and family, watching over the children, teaching 
and directing the servants, and having a general super- 
vision over the household. She was married in middle 
life, but, her husband soon dying of consumption, she re- 
turned to her good master and mistress, to whose interests 
she devoted herself unreservedly, until the family became 
dissolved b}' death and marriages, and the house was given 
up. Then the grateful children provided a home for her, 
and smoothed her last days, she in return loving them all 
as if they were her own children, thus furnishing a beauti- 
ful and true example of old-fashioned domestics as they 
formerly existed in New England. They identified them- 
selves with the interests of their employers and their 
greatest pride was to sustain the honor and promote the 
well-being of the family. 

The wise and good Dr. Holyoke, of Salem, who attained 
the great age of one hundred and one years with unim- 
paired faculties, took a girl on trial for a short time and 



128 MRS. WILLIAM JAR VIS 

she proved a faithful and excellent friend, remaining in the 
household for fifty years, until after the death of the aged 
doctor. Another remained in the family for seventy 
years ! 

Mr. Leonard White, Mrs. Bartlett's brother, resided in 
his father's house, next to Mr. Bartlett's and married Miss 
Dalton of Newburyport, of an old and highly respected 
family. Mr. White was cashier of the Merrimac Bank, 
and remarkable for his uprightness and integrity ; for his 
amiable disposition, fine appearance and courteous man- 
ners. Rarely a day passed that he did not call in to see 
his sister in the evening. As his children grew up, they 
too became pleasant companions for their cousins. 

The society in Haverhill was remarkably refined and 
cultivated. Here the Saltonstalls lived, descendants of 
Sir Richard Saltonstall, one of the old puritans. One of 
the sons, Leverett Saltonstall became an eminent and able 
lawyer in Salem ; a man of superior abilities, agreeable as 
a companion, and of a noble presence. Two of Mr. Lev- 
erett Saltonstall's sisters were the loved and chosen com- 
panions of Anna Bartlett, especially the eldest, Anne, 
whose friendship only ended with her life. 

There were two families of Duncans in Haverhill also, 
and the At woods, one of whose daughters was Harriet, 
afterward Mrs. Newell, a pioneer missionary abroad ; the 
Osgoods, and another family of Whites, etc. 

The little Anna Bartlett was brought up in the strict- 
ness of that period, and was a model of propriety. Needle- 
work and reading went hand in hand in those days, and 
the earliest childish instruction consisted in learning: to 
read and to sew. Then followed writing, arithmetic, etc. 
At the age of six little Anna made a fine linen shirt for her 
father, with its elaborate ruffles of linen cambric, for the 
bosom and wrists. For her industry and patience her 



OF WEATHERSFIELD, VERMONT. 129 

(Traudmother gave her a gold thimble. To the young peo- 
ple of the present day this seems an incredible feat ; but 
children then were taught reading, writing and sewing 
much earlier than now. I knew a lady of high standing, 
a friend of John Quincy Adams, who learned to read at 
three years of age, and could read in the Bible at four 
years. She lived to be seventy, a tall and elegant woman, 
an ornament to society. 

Her constitution did not seem, according to modern the- 
ory, to have suffered by this early training. 

At the ages of fourteen and twelve, Anna and her sis- 
ter Eliza went to a boarding-school to enlarge their knowl- 
edge, and acquire some accomplishments. Among the 
latter were playing on the spinet, embroidery and paint- 
ing in water colors, and writing in a small, clear, elegant 
hand. All the younger sisters in turn were educated the 
same way. 

In 1797 Hon. Bailey Bartlett was elected member of 
Congress of the United States, and held the office four 
years ; he was a member of the last Congress held in Phil- 
adelphia, and the first which met at Washington. He was 
the chosen companion of the lamented Chief Justice Par- 
ker ; between whom the warmest and most cordial friend- 
ship continued to exist until the death of the Judge. Mr. 
Bartlett left his beloved family with regret ; but while 
duty to his country obliged him to be absent, he invited 
a young gentleman, a friend of his, to reside in the fam- 
ily, to assist his wife in every way possible ; which he 
did with the utmost faithfulness and courtesy. This 
young gentleman afterwards became a wealthy and emi- 
nent man. 

Mr. Bartlett belonged to the party called Federalists, 
as did John Adams, and Alexander Hamilton ; and his 
political career closed with the election of Jefferson. 

HIST. COLL. XXIV. 9 



130 MRS. WILLIAM JAR VIS 

But the highest traits of his character cannot be known 
to the world. They are disclosed chiefly by the family 
that he reared, trained and stamped with his own simili- 
tude. They were characterized by every trait, unselfish, 
gentle, kind and affectionate. His sons and his daugh- 
ters rose up and called him blessed. His daughters were 
like fair young olive plants round about him. Though 
usually grave and dignified, yet in his social hours a 
sunny smile and two expressive dimples lighted up his 
face, making it genial and attractive. From the time he 
left Congress, his leisure hours, gleaned from his duties as 
high sheriff of Essex county, were devoted to reading, 
horticulture and mechanics. He had a large garden about 
a quarter of a mile from the house, which under his care- 
ful supervision was cultivated skilfully and supplied the 
wants of the family abundantly with fruit and vegetables. 
It was bordered with red and white currants and goose- 
berries, which bore large quantities of rich and juicy 
fruit. His rare varieties of summer and winter apples 
were a treat to his family and friends, and barrels of 
apples and pears were stored away in the autumn for win- 
ter use. 

When fatigued by his official duties and responsibilities, 
he often derived recreation and amusement from the man- 
ufacture of elegant and useful articles for his wife and 
daughters ; for which purpose he kept a nice set of tools. 
Mrs. Bartlett's health being delicate, she was often confined 
to her room, but her prayers ascended to God daily for her 
family. She stood at the helm of her household and sent 
forth her directions so that everything went on like clock- 
work in this beautifully ordered family. As soon as the 
daughters were old enough to take a part in domestic af- 
fairs, some light duty was assigned them in the morning 
to minister to the comfort and well being of the whole. 



OF WEATHERSFIELD, VERMONT. 131 

They were early instructed in the art of making delicious 
cake, pastry, puddings and jellies, and were all remarka- 
ble in after life for their proficiency and skill in this de- 
partment. Their father would have thought them very 
remiss if they were not all neatly dressed for the day at 
their one o'clock dinner. Peace and harmony reigned in 
the household. After the death of her grandmother, Miss 
Mary P. Sparhawk spent much time with her aunt, Mrs. 
Dr. Charles Jarvis of Boston, a granddaughter of Sir Wm. 
Pepperell. This aunt had no children of her own and was 
very fond of her niece. Her husband, Dr. Jarvis, was one 
of the most ardent patriots of the Revolution, and the in- 
timate friend of John Hancock and Samuel Adams. 

In Faneuil Hall, that Cradle of Liberty, he often ad- 
dressed the citizens of Boston, with whom he was very 
popular, and the clear musical tones of his voice, ringing 
forth the words of an ardent eloquence, helped to kindle 
those fires of patriotism, which led to the independence 
of the country. It was hence an advantage to Miss 
Sparhawk to be with Dr. and Mrs. Jarvis, for not only 
did some of the first men of the times resort to their 
house, but they both took an interest in directing her 
course of reading and studies. At their house she first 
met with Dr. Jarvis' only son William, who had recently 
returned from the south and established himself as a 
merchant in Boston. He had been educated in the best 
schools of Boston, Philadelphia, and Bordentown, N. J, 
He was distinguished for diligence in business, and strict 
uprightness and integrity, and was moreover intelligent, 
agreeable, handsome, and a general favorite in society. 

The intelligence, loveliness, and modest simplicity of 
Miss Sparhawk won his heart. They were engaged with 
the approbation of his mother-in-law and all the friends 
concerned, and everything seemed auspicious, when a sad 



132 MRS. WILLIAM JARVIS 

calamity occurred to them. A mercantile house, reputed 
wealthy, for whom Mr. William Jarvis had been induced 
to endorse, failed suddenly for a large amount, and he 
found that the whole of his property must inevitably be 
swept away by it. 

He first paid his private debts, and then gave up every 
cent remaining to the creditors ; but, even this amount 
did not suffice by $14,500.00. He offered to give his 
notes for that sum to be paid in five animal installments, 
and his proposal was accepted. He was too honest and 
noble-minded to attempt any evasion ; but he made a sol- 
emn resolution, which he kept through life, never again 
to become surety for another. 

He could not, in his present situation, think of binding 
Miss Sparhawk by her engagement, and therefore released 
her, although it was a sad parting for both. She returned 
to the sheltering love of her uncle and aunt Bartlett. Mr. 
Jarvis now directed all his energies to the accomplishment 
of his task. Going to sea immediately, as master of a 
vessel, by a series of wisely planned, promptly executed 
voyages he was crowned with success. At the end of 
five years, after enduring hardships, perils, privations, 
and narrow escapes almost unprecedented, he was enabled 
to return to Boston, and free himself from every liability. 

A day or two after his return his father received a let- 
ter from the Hon. Josiah Quincy, then in Congress, say- 
ing that William Jarvis of Boston, had been appointed 
Consul General at Lisbon. The official announcement 
came soon afterwards, and Mr. Jarvis hastened to Wash- 
ington to see Mr. Madison, then Secretary of State. On 
his arrival, he found that the last minister to Portugal had 
been recalled, and Mr. Madison begged Mr. Jarvis to act 
as charge d' affaires at the Court of Portugal. 

Mr. Jarvis at first modestly declined the appointment, 



OF WEATHERSFIELD, VEEMONT. 133 

fearing he had not sufficient knowledge of diplomatic af- 
fairs, but his scruples were overruled by Mr. Madison. 
The treasury was then low, and Mr. Madison told Mr. 
Jarvis that he would not then fix on a salary, but that he 
should have a suitable and satisfactory compensation for 
his services. The Consul arrived in Lisbon, Aug. 2, 1802, 
and for eight years labored with untiring assiduity to 
promote the interests of his country and government, to 
whose institutions and principles he was ardently devoted. 

Entering into partnership with two of his early friends, 
he opened a counting house as commission merchant, in 
Lisbon, and was so well prospered in business that in 1806 
he renewed the offer of his hand and heart to Miss Spar- 
hawk. The lady had been constant to her first and only 
attachment and she accepted his offer, but several months 
elapsed ere they were united. He could not leave his 
official duties in Lisbon, and her friends were averse to her 
going out to join him ; but finally in the autumn of 1807, 
he sent out a vessel for her with his cousin, John H. Jar- 
vis, to be her escort. 

Mrs. Bartlett provided a suitable middle-aged woman 
for her companion, and in December, 1807, she left Amer- 
ica with the blessing of all her friends. Just about this 
time she heard of the death of Dr. Charles Jarvis, which 
gave a great shock to her feelings, and on her arrival in 
Lisbon she found herself still pursued by misfortune. 

A bitter disappointment awaited her. The city was 
strictly blockaded by Wellington, and with the sadness of 
"hope deferred," she was obliged to sail to San Lucas in 
Spain. Mr. Hackley, the American consul at that port, 
and his good lady, treated her with the utmost kindness 
and courtesy, taking her to their house where she remained 
until Mr. Jarvis could cross the mountains between Lis- 
bon and San Lucas to join her. In March, 1808, Mr. 



134 MRS. WILLIAM JAR VIS 






Hackley married them, and the whole party performed 
the wedding tour to Lisbon on donkeys. 

Mrs. Jarvis, with her earnest piety, wished to have the 
marriage rite performed by a Protestant clergyman ; but 
according to the laws of Portugal it must be sanctified by 
a Romish priest ; accordingly her marriage was three times 
performed. Mr. Jarvis had a beautiful home on the Ta- 
gus awaiting the arrival of his bride, where they enjoyed 
much domestic felicity. 

It was about this time that Eliza, the second daughter 
of the Hon. Bailey Bartlett, a lovely, dignified and ac- 
complished young lady, married Joseph Sprague, Esq., a 
talented and promising lawyer of Salem, who was after- 
ward distinguished as an orator and ardent patriot, and 
Miss Anna Bartlett, who subsequently became Mr. Jar- 
vis' second wife, was much with her sister. 

Party strife in politics at this time ran so high that the 
opposite sides did not exchange visits. Sheriff Bartlett 
was a Federalist as was also his friend, Col. Pickman of 
Salem. Anna Bartlett was the intimate friend of the 
Colonel's daughter, Miss Rawlins Pickman, and this friend- 
ship lasted through their lives. Mr. Sprague was a Re- 
publican and his friends were of that party. His wife and 
wife's sister were invited to mingle in their society, but 
by having the prudence and good sense to avoid conver- 
sation upon politics, Miss Anna Bartlett won the esteem 
and friendship of both parties. Mr. and Mrs. Sprague 
were a very happy couple and had six children. Bailey 
Bartlett, the eldest brother, went into business in New- 
buryport ; Edwin at the age of fifteen entered Mr. Jarvis' 
counting house at Lisbon. He afterwards went to Guay- 
aquil and Lima in South America, where he acquired a 
large fortune. He married Miss Harrod of Portland and 
finally became one of the merchant princes of New York, 



OF WEATHERSFIELD, VERMONT. 135 

and died at his residence on the Hudson a few years since. 
His brother Charles was with him in Lima for a short 
time, and was there appointed consul at Trinidad. Sub- 
sequently he became a commission merchant in Boston, 
and married Miss Plummer, a lady of worth and fine abil- 
ities. Their only son, Gen. Wm. Francis Bartlett, left 
Harvard College to serve his country in the late war. He 
was a very brave and efficient officer, but was taken pris- 
oner and endured the most horrible cruelties. At last his 
exchange was effected, but instead of the tall, vigorous 
form that entered the service, he was ever afterward an in- 
valid and a sufferer. He married a lovely young lady in 
Pittsfield, and they had four children. 

Francis, the youngest son of sheriff Bartlett, entered 
into business in New York and died young. All the 
daughters were married. 

Portugal was then occupied by two contending armies. 
The British blockaded Lisbon, the French were encamped 
in its environs ; the Prince Regent and his court had left 
Portugal for Brazil, on the invasion of the French in No- 
vember, 1807. After the French invaded Spain, the Span- 
ish Junta confiscated the flocks of merino sheep belonging 
to noblemen who had joined the French, and offered them 
for sale to raise funds. It had been contrary to the laws 
of Spain to export these sheep, under penalty of death. 
Mr. Jarvis, ever eager to promote the interests of his be- 
loved country, thought these fine-wooled sheep would be 
invaluable to agriculturists, and purchased between three 
and four thousand sheep, and sent them to the United 
States. He exported more than all others put together, 
reserving about four hundred for himself. The sheep sold 
well in America, and he realized a handsome remunera- 
tion from the sale. 

Mr. Jarvis had been highly prospered in his business. He 






136 MRS. WILLIAM JARVIS 

had wholly supplied the French army with flour, which 
had brought him a large profit ; but, finally, the business 
came to an end and he determined to resign his office and 
return to America where the sheep had already been sent. 
In October, 1810, therefore, he fitted up a brig as com- 
fortably as possible, and embarked with his wife and in- 
fant daughter. They had a stormy voyage and did not 
land in Boston until December. The cold New England 
climate was a fearful contrast to the mild, salubrious air of 
Portugal, and Mrs. Jarvis, whose health was delicate, was 
much affected by the change. The Consul obtained a com- 
fortable boarding place for her in Haverhill, near her 
uncle Bartlett's family, where her cousins, especially Miss 
Anna Bartlett, were unremitting in their kind attentions. 
Mr. Jarvis was obliged to go to Washington. He had 
presented Mr. Jefferson and Mr. Madison each with a pair 
of his valuable merino sheep. Mr. Jefferson, immediately 
on his arrival in America, wrote him a long and very com- 
plimentary letter, thanking him for the sheep, and speak- 
ing in the highest appreciation of his valuable and efficient 
services while in Lisbon, and of the advantage he had been 
to the commerce of the United States, etc., etc. ; all of 
which was extremely gratifying to Mr. Jarvis. 

Mr. Madison, then President, expressed the same cor- 
dial commendation of Mr. Jarvis' unusually energetic and 
untiring exertions in behalf of his country. They were 
just on the eve of the second war with Great Britain. The 
treasury was still low and Mr. Madison made no allusion 
to salary. Mr. Jarvis thought as he had been prospered 
in his private affairs perhaps he could as well afford to do 
without his salary as his country could afford to pay it, 
and therefore made no claim. 

Where can such another instance be found of a man who 
fulfilled all the duties of foreign minister for eight years 



OF WEATHERSFIELD, VERMONT. 137 

without the slightest compensation ? It shows the patriot- 
ism and public spirit from which the revolution was born. 

From his residence in Europe, Mr. Jarvis had learned 
to hold the possession of real estate in high esteem. He 
saw the nobility placing a high value upon their estates, 
and determined to purchase a large tract of land and to 
elevate the condition of agriculture, which was then very 
low. First he went to Virginia, but not finding a plan- 
tation that suited him, he was finally induced by his cousin, 
Dr. Leonard Jarvis, who with his father had purchased a 
beautiful place in Claremont, New Hampshire, to buy a 
large tract of meadow land, formed by a bow in the Con- 
necticut river, in Weathersfield, Vermont, directly opposite 
Claremont. This land was rich and fertile ; a large house 
for his own residence, and a small village consisting of a 
store, public house, blacksmith's shop, etc., were also in- 
cluded in the purchase for which he paid the cash down, a 
remarkable event in those days. After having his sheep 
driven from Newburyport to this farm he returned to his 
wife early in February, and on the 22nd of that month she 
gave birth to another daughter. Consumption was wast- 
ing her delicate frame, and early in April she knew her 
end was approaching. Sending for the clergyman, of whose 
church she was a member, to consecrate her infants to 
God in baptism, she received the communion herself, and 
thus passed away to a better sphere. 

Her sorrowing friends 

— " Saw not the angels who met her there : 
The gates of the city they could not see ; 
But they knew she was safe on the further side, 
Where all the ransomed and angels be." 

Soon after this Mr. Jarvis removed with his two mother- 
less little girls, from Haverhill, Mass., accompanied by his 
father's widow, Mrs. Dr. Charles Jarvis, to his estate in 

HIST, coll. XXIV 9* 



138 MES. WILLIAM JARVIS 

Vermont. Early in 1816, he was attacked with rheu- 
matic fever and he was just able to go in his carriage, by 
easy stages, to Saratoga in June. He had a man to drive 
and assist him in and out, and a nurse for himself and one 
for his little girls. The waters proved most salutary, and 
at the end of six weeks he was quite recruited and returned 
home able to walk and attend to his business. His house 
seemed desolate and lonely, and he had suffered so much 
during his severe illness from the want of woman's gentle 
care and nursing that he began to feel the importance of 
obtaining a wife, and his thoughts turned to his late wife's 
cousin, Miss Anna Bailey Bartlett, of Haverhill, Mass., 
whose sterling worth and excellence of character were well 
known to him, and who had been most kind and attentive 
to Mrs. Jarvis in her last illness. He first made propo- 
sals by letter which were not unfavorably received, and in 
February, 1817, he took his little girls in a covered sleigh 
to Mr. Bartlett's to urge his suit in person. They were 
engaged and the time of the marriage fixed for May. His 
little girls were delighted when told that cousin Anna was 
to be their mamma. Her two youngest sisters were young 
enough to be their companions, and the daughter of her 
sister Eliza, a lovely little girl. The large old nursery had 
two southern windows which flooded it with sunshine ; and 
a bright open fire was kept burning all day. A tall black 
walnut chest of drawers, polished like ebony, stood in one 
corner, with its rows of brass handles shining like gold 
from top to bottom. In this bright cheerful room the 
children pursued their games with untiring zeal and en- 
joyment. It was indeed a happy family. Six grown up 
daughters still reside beneath the paternal roof, and how 
vividly does the picture of their domestic life come up be- 
fore me ! Some are seated with their fancy work baskets 
in the broad, stuffed, old-fashioned window seats, and 



OF WEATHERSFIELD, VERMONT. 139 

others about the room. The gentle mother is in her ac- 
customed easy chair by the fireside. A bright fire of evenly 
cut walnut logs glows on the hearth, the tall brass and- 
irons, shovel and tongs reflecting the cheerful blaze. In 
the evening the father of the family sat opposite his wife 
in his large chair. The side board glowed with ruddy 
shining apples, with rich currant wine, and fine shagbarks 
or walnuts. Every evening friends called in ; some to 
play backgammon with the Sheriff, some with Mrs. Bart- 
lett or Miss Catherine, and some to chat with the young 
ladies. At nine refreshments were distributed and at ten 
all had taken their leave. The intercourse was social, cor- 
dial, friendly ; such is a home picture of seventy years 
ago, without ceremony or parade. 

The drawing room, with its Wilton carpet, spinet, high 
backed stuffed mahogany chairs and arches over the win- 
dow seats, was only used on grand occasions. 
[To be continued.'] 



AN "EPICEDIUM," 

COMPOSED IN 1752 BY REV. JOHN CLEAVELAND OF 
CHEBACCO (NOW ESSEX) IN IPSWICH, MASS. 



BY E. P. CROWELL, 

Professor in Amherst College. 



Among the numerous publications of this clergyman, 
one has recently come to light which is a pamphlet of six- 
teen pages, octavo, with the following quaint title : 

An Epicedium, 

OR A 

Poetical Attempt upon the Life & Death 
or 

Mr. Josiah Cleaveland, 

LATE OF 

CANTERBURY. 

Who departed this Life (undoubtedly) 
to a better, February 9 th 1750, 
Aged Sixty years four Months. 

Zech. 1. 5. Your fathers where are they? 

Ps. 89 ; 48. What Man is he that lives and fhall not 
fee death ? fhall he deliver his foul from the Hand of the 
grave ? 

Kev. 14 : 13. Write bleffed are the Dead that die in 
the Lord. 

Luke 16. 22. The Beggar died, and was carried by 
the Angels into Abraham's Bofom. 

(140) 



AN EPICEDIUM. 141 

2 Sam. 1. 17. And David lamented with this Lamen- 
tation over Saul and over Jonathan his Son. 
Boston: Printed by S. Kneeland, 1753. 

The preface is an acrostic and consists of sixty- three 

decasyllabic Hues rhyming in couplets, the initial letters 

of which form the words: "John Cleaveland, author of 

this little book and pastor of a church in Ipswich." It 

begins as follows : 

In this plain Verfe, I clo attempt to fhew, 
court'ous Reader ! nought but what is true ; 
His Character, as I have fet it forth, 
None will deny, to be beyond his Worth. 

The next ten lines are eulogistic of the subject of the 
poem, and the rest is a religious exhortation to the reader. 

The "Epicedinm" itself contains three hundred and 
sixty-eight lines of the same length as those of the pref- 
ace and rhyming in the same way. The opening lines are 
as follows : 

Since I have heard the late, the mournful News, 
My Father's Death; my painful, penfive Muse, 
Would fain revive, and fpend a little Breath, 
Both on his Life and alfo on his Death. 

The poem then makes mention of his early life, his mar- 
riage and his children. Next are given the story of his 
conversion, a delineation of his religious character, the 
scene of his death and his last words to his friends. The 
conclusion is an exhortation to his children and friends. 

To the "Epicedium" is appended this "Epitaph :" 

Under this Hillock fmall doth lie, 

Inter'd Josiah Cleaveland's Dust 

'Twill hear the Resurrection cry 

When Death's cold Bonds asunder burft. 

No doubt it will triumphing rife, 

Before the Morning of that Day ; 

When Christ shall all the World furprize, 



142 an epicedium: 

His Gofpel's Voice who wcu'dn't obey. 
Then fhall this mortal Di ft inveft, 
A Nature pure, and unco? rupt : 
And enter to the bleffed Reft, 
Where's nought their Joy to Interrupt. 

Josiah Cleaveland, the subject of this elegy, came of 
good Puritan stock and, as is gleaned from other sources 
of information, was every way worthy of the tribute here 
paid to his character. He was the grandson of Moses 
Cleaveland, an immigrant from Ipswich, England, in 1635, 
who married, Sept. 26, 1648, Ann, daughter of Edward 
Winn, lived in Woburn, had eleven children and died 
Jan. 9, 1702 ; and the son of Josiah Cleaveland, who was 
born Feb. 26, 1667, lived in Chelmsford until 1694, then 
removed with one other family to that part of the fertile 
meadows of the Quinebaug in Windham Co., Connecti- 
cut (which was organized as the town of Canterbury in 
1709), had nine children and died April 26, 1709. 

Josiah Cleaveland, 2d, was born Oct. 7, 1690, married 
Abigail, daughter of Elisha Paine of Canterbury and had 
eleven children, of whom six were sons. By his father's 
death the entire care of the family and the farm devolved 
upon him when he was but twenty years of age ; and for 
the excellent training and stanch character of his brothers 
and sisters as well as of his own children he deserved the 
full credit. He was one of the most influential men in 
his day in all town matters. Throughout his life a pillar 
in the Congregational church, he left to it at his death, his 
part of the ownership of the meeting-house and £200 in 
money. From one of his first cousins is descended the 
present President of the United States. 

Four of the sons of Josiah Cleaveland, 2d, and several of 
his nephews served in the Revolutionary army. Indeed, 
the historian of Windham County declares that there were 
in that army, from Canterbury, "Cleavelands almost with- 
out number." 



BY REV. JOHN CLEAVELAND. 143 

The seventh child of Josiah Cleaveland, 2d, was John, 
the author of this "Poetical Attempt," who was born April 
11, 1722. His early life was spent upon the farm. An 
injury caused by an ambitious attempt to outstrip others 
in stone-wall building, when he was about seventeen years 
old, disabled him for severe physical labor, and preparing 
for college he entered Yale in 1741. For the offence of 
attending religious meetings of the "Separatists," so called, 
at his home and with his parents, after the close of his 
Junior year he was expelled from College in December, 
1744, but in 1763 the college authorities granted him the 
decree of A. B. and enrolled him a member of the class 
of 1745, to which he had belonged. 

After studying theology he became pastor of a "Separ- 
atist" church in Chebacco, in Ipswich, Mass., Feb. 25, 
1747, and after a ministry of fifty-two years died there, 
April 22, 1799. To his intellectual ability,, his oratorical 
power, his zealous devotion to his professional work and 
his almost unbounded influence with the community in 
which he lived, there is abundant testimony in the local 
histories. His patriotic services also, as a chaplain in the 
French and Indian war, when he accompanied the pro- 
vincial forces to Lake George and to the Island of Cape 
Breton, and in the war of the Revolution are a matter of 
record. It was a traditional saying in his parish, that "he 
preached all the young men among his people into the 
army and then went himself, taking his four sons with 
him." Two of these served as surgeons and were after- 
wards, for a long period, eminent as physicians and con- 
spicuous in political affairs throughout the county of Essex 
in which they resided. Another of them died in the army 
and the fourth was a useful and successful clergyman 
through a long life. 

Bancroft in his History of the United States, Vol. IV, 



144 AN EPICEDIUM : 

makes mention of Mr. Cleaveland in connection with the 
expedition of Abercrombie in 1758 as one of those " chap- 
lains who preached to the regiments of citizen soldiers a 
renewal of the days when Moses with the rod of God in 
his hand sent Joshua against Amalek." 

What his eulogist, Eev. Dr. Parish, of Byfield, Mass., 
said in a memorial discourse after his death, was literally 
true : " Active and enterprising, he repeatedly left the 
silence of his study for the din of war ; the joys of domes- 
tic peace for the dangers of the bloody field. The waters 
of Champlain, the rocks of Cape Breton, the fields of Cam- 
bridge and the banks of the Hudson listened to the fervor 
of his addresses." 

That Rev. Mr. Cleaveland was, in some respects, far in 
advance of his age, in his spirit of Christian philanthropy, 
appears in a very striking manner in the following letter 
which he wrote in 1763, soon after the close of the French 
and Indian war, on the duty of undertaking the christian- 
izing of the American Indians. 

Very dear Sir : Since I have understood that the pre- 
liminary articles of Peace are ratified, by which the vast 
country on the eastern side of the river Mississippi, from 
the source of said river to the ocean, is ceded (i. e., by 
France) to his Brittanic majesty, I have been ready to 
think we never had so loud a call and so wide a door 
opened, to use endeavors to propagate the gospel and 
spread the savour of the knowledge of Christ among the 
Indian tribes, which inhabit or rather range in the ex- 
tended wilds of North America as now we have. A view 
to christianize the Heathen was a pious motive with our 
Forefathers to come into this America at first ; and what 
all along has been an obstruction to their conversion God 
has now removed. And as God has now given the Eng- 
lish nation all North America it can't be thought that we 



BY REV. JOHN CLEAVELAND. 145 

render again according to the benefit done unto us, if we 
neglect to improve all proper means to communicate to 
the heathen the inestimable treasure of the Gospel, which 
God has long indulged us with and now secured the en- 
joyment of to us against those that ever have sought to 
deprive us of the same. Moreover, can it be supposed 
that God has wonderfully crowned the British arms with 
success and given us all this vast country which is now 
ceded to us, merely for Great Britain's and British- Ameri- 
can Colonies' sake — seeing the promise is of the heathen 
to Christ for an inheritance." 
Amherst College, August 3, 1883. 

HIST. COLL. XXIV 10 



INSCRIPTIONS FROM THE OLD BURYING 
GROUND AT LYNNFIELD CENTRE. 



COPIED BY JOHN T. MOULTON. 



This burying ground is on the main street of the village, 
just southerly from the common and a short distance westerly 
from the church. As Lyunfield was originally a partof 
Lynn and was called the second parish, it is of interest to 
persons tracing family lines back to Lynn, to know that 
many of these names are found on the Lynn town records 
previous to the year 1815, when Lynnfield was made a sepa- 
rate town. Yet the records of the parish of Lynnfield 
begin Dec. 7, 1713, and there are also church records 
which have been published in the Institute Collections. 

There are three other cemeteries in the town, one at 
the Centre, near the old yard, and two at South Lynn- 
field. The nearest is called Forest Hill Cemetery, and 
was consecrated Oct. 14, 1856. Addresses on the occa- 
sion were made by Rev. E. R. Hodgman and Rev. A. P. 
Chute. 

Here lyes the body of Doc ter John Aborn, who de- 
parted this life Novem r the 8 th 1768, in the 41 year of his 
age. 

In memory of Mrs. Rebecca Dodge, formerly the wife 
of Dr. John Aborn, who died June 20, 1798, Mi. 64. 

Here lyes y e body of John Aborn, son of Doc tr John 
& Mrs. Rebeccah Aborn, who departed this life March 2, 
1769, in the 8 th year of his age. 

(14G) 



LYNNFIELD CENTRE INSCRIPTIONS. 147 

Here lyes y e body of Elizabeth Aborn, daughter of 
Doct r John Aborn & Mrs. Eebecca Aborn, who died July 
2 d 1770 aged 1 year, 6 months. 

Here lies buried the body of Rev. Benjamin Adams, 
Pastor of the Second Church of Christ in Lynn, who 
departed this life May the 4 th 1777 in the 58 year of 
his age, and 22 d of his ministry. 

The memory of the just is blessed. 

Here lies buried the body of M rs Rebecca Adams, con- 
sort of the Rev d Benjamin Adams, who departed this life 
Aug st 22 d 1776, in the 43 d year of her age. 

God is just. 

Erected in memory of Dr. Benjamin Adams. Obt. 
Jan. 16, 1811, Mt. 53. 

This stone is erected to the memory of two children of 
Dr. Benjamin & Mrs. Lois Adams, viz 1 . 

Edward Augustus, died March 8, 1796, aged 1 year, 
11 months & 13 days. 

Edward Augustus 2 d died Feb. 14, 1797, aged 14 
days. 

Erected in memory of Benjamin Perkins Adams, son of 
Dr. Benjamin & Mrs. Lois Adams, who died Nov. 13, 
1809, aged 6 days. 

Erected in memory of Delia Augusta Adams, daughter 
of Dr. Benjamin & Mrs. Augusta Adams, died May 30, 
1805, aged 11 months & 17 days. 

Here lyes interr d the body of Deacon John Bancroft, 
who departed this life Decem br y e 20 th 1768, in the 87 th 
year of his age. 

Rev. 14, verse 13. Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord. 



148 INSCRIPTIONS FROM GRAVESTONES 

Here lyes y e body of M rs Mary Bancroft, wife to 
Dea con John Bancroft, who departed this life July y e 25 th 
1763, in y e 82 year of her age. 

Here lyes y e body of M rs Mary Bancroft, wife to 
Dea con John Bancroft, who dec'd Oct r 1 st 1723, in y e 39 th 
year of her age. 

Here lyes y e body of Hannah Bancroft, dau' tr of Dea con 
John & M rs Mary Bancroft, who died July 23 d 1738 in y e 
10 th year of her age. 

Here lyes buried y e body of M r John Bancroft, who 
departed this life Jan ry 25, 1739, in y e 84 th year of his 
age. 

Here lyes y e body of M rs Hannah Bancroft, wife to 
Ensign John Bancroft, who died June 7 th 1732, in y e 76 
year of her age. 

Cap* Ebenezer Bancroft (foot-stone, head-stone gone). 

Ruth, daughter of M r Ebenezer & M rs Euth Bancroft, 
died Sep* 22 d 1730, aged 4 years, 1 month & 13 days. 

Ebenezer, son of M r Ebenezer & M r8 Ruth Bancroft, 
died May 2 d 1742, aged 4 years & 8 days. 

Nathaniel Bancroft, died Feb. 20 th 1750, aged 3 days. 

Hannah Bancroft, died Sept br 11 th 1752, aged 11 days. 

Nathaniel Bancroft, y e 2 d died Feb. 10 th , 1754, aged 13 
days, y e children of Mr. Nathaniel & Mrs. Mary Ban- 
croft. 

In memory of Lieut. James Bancroft, who died Aug. 

22, 1814, Mt. 82 years. 

Esther Smith, his wife died March 25, 1814, Mt. 87 

years. 

Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord. 



IN LYNNFIELD CENTRE. 149 

Sacred to the memory of Deacon Nathaniel Bancroft. 
Obt. June 26, 1810, Mt. 85. 

He served his generation by the will of God, " fell on sleep," and 
was laid unto his fathers. 

Blessed are they that do his commandments. 

Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Mary Bancroft, Relict 

of Deacon Nathaniel Bancroft, Obt. Oct. 5, 1815, ML 90. 

Because he hath set his love upon me, With long life will I satisfy 
him, And show him my salvation. 

"Jesus wept." This monument is erected to perpetuate 
the memory of a valuable friend and brother, Thomas Ban- 
croft, Esq., M. A., son of Deacon Nathaniel Bancroft, 
Obt. at Canton, Nov. 16, 1807, ML 42. 

Jesus saith unto her, thy brother shall rise again. 

In memory of Mr. James Brown, who died Jan. 5, 1815, 
2Et. 72. 

Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord. 

In memory of Mrs. Lydia Brown, wife of Mr. James 
Brown, who died Oct. 2, 1786, Mt. 38. 

Seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness. 

In memory of Mrs. Susanna Brown, 2 d wife of Mr. James 
Brown, who died Nov. 8 th , 1802, ML 53. 
One thing is needful. 

In memory of Miss Nancy Brown, daughter of Mr. Sam- 
uel & Mrs. Elizabeth Brown of Boston, who died Feb. 
7 th , 1801, aged 14 years and 6 months. 

Farewell, bright soul, a short farewell, 
Till we shall meet again above. 

In memory of Capt. John Danforth, Obt. Aug. 16,1796, 

iEt. 40. 



150 INSCRIPTIONS FROM GRAVESTONES 

In memory of Mrs. Hannah Danforth, relict of Capt. 
John Bancroft and daughter of Deacon Nathaniel Bancroft, 
who died April 12, 1806, Mt. 51. 

The dust shall return to the earth as it was, And the spirit shall re- 
turn unto God who gave it. 

In memory of Miss Elizabeth Dodge, who died May 9, 
1821, Mt. 53. 

Here in the silent grave I lie, 
No more the scenes of life to try, 
And you dear friends I leave behind, 
Must soon this gloomy mansion find. 

Here lyes the body of Mr. Joseph Eaton, who departed 
this life June 3 d , 1746, in the 64 th year of his age. 

Here lyes y e body of M rs Elizabeth Eaton, wife of M r 
Joseph Eaton ; who departed this life March y e 18, 1771, 
in y e 63 d year of her age. 

Pearson Eaton, son of Mr. Joseph & M rs Elizabeth 
Eaton, died Feb ry 19, 1754, aged 1 year & 8 months. 

Sarah Eaton, dau tr of M r Joseph & M rs Elizabeth Ea- 
ton, died March 2 d 1743, aged 1 month & 2 days. 

Sarah Eaton, dau tr of M r Joseph & M rs Elizabeth Eaton 
died, November 5 th , 1745, aged 2 months. 

Joseph Eaton, son of M r Joseph & M rs Elizabeth 
Eaton, died July 16 th , 1749, aged 6 weeks & 2 days. 

Here lyes y e body of M rs Sarah Gowing, wife to Lieut. 
Thomas Gowing, who departed March y e 4 th , 1764, in ye 
65 th year of her age. 



IN LYNNFIELD CENTRE. 151 

In memory of Mr. John Hawks, who died May 3, 1811, 

Mt. 57. 

Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord ; They rest from their labors 
and their works do follow them. 

In memory of Mrs. Eachel Hawks, wife of Mr. John 
Hawks, who died April 1, 1814, in the 56 year of her age. 

Great God, I own thy sentance just, 

And nature must decay ; 

I yield my body to the dust, 

To dwell with fellow clay, 

Yet faith may triumph o'er the grave, 

— And trample on the tombs — 

My Jesus, my Redeemer lives, 

My God, my Saviour comes. 

In memory of Miss Pamela Hawks, daughter of Mr. 
John and Mrs. Rachel Hawks, who departed this life Oc- 
tober 2 d , 1794, in the 14 tb year of her age. 

Oh ! death, thou hast conquered me, 
I by thy dart am slain, 
But Christ has conquered thee 
And I shall rise again. 

In memory of Miss Sally Hawks, who died Sept. 4, 
1811, in the 24 th year of her age. 

The rising morning can't assume, 
That we shall end the day ; 
For death stands ready at the door, 
To snatch our lives away. 

In memory of John Hawks, who died March 31, 1845, 
Mt. 67. 

In memory of Mrs. Sally Hawks, wife of Mr. John 
Hawks, who died Sept. 20, 1811, Mt. 27. 

Farewell my friends, I bid adieu 
The silent tomb still waits for you. 



152 INSCRIPTIONS FROM GRAVESTONES 

In memory of Miss Narcissa Hawks, who died Sept. 1, 
1818, in the 25 th year of her age. 

Sleep on sweet maid, thy griefs are past, 
Grim death hath sever'd us at last ; 
And what thou art I soon must be, 
Dwell in the dust below with thee. 
Short was thy passage to th' eternal dome, 
Etherial mansions claim'd thee as their own, 
Now join'd with numerous train of spirits blest, 
Thy sleep is sweet in everlasting rest. 

Lois, wife of John Hawkes, died Jan. 10, 1865. 2Et. 
79 years, 9 months. 

John A., son of John & Lois Hawkes, died March 20, 
1864. -ZEt. 45 years, 5 months. 

Emily Orne Hall. (No date.) 

The memory of the just is blessed. 

Sacred to the memory of the Rev. Joseph Mottey, pastor 
of the church of Christ in Lynnfield, who died July 9 th , 
1821 in the 66 th year of his age, and the 38 th of his min- 
istry. He was distinguished by a powerful mind, and was 
a learned, faithful and exemplary minister. 

A resurrection solves the knot. 

This humble stone to perpetuate the memory of an amia- 
ble woman, who in giving life sacrificed her own. Mrs. 
Elizabeth Mottey consort of the Rev. Joseph Mottey, died 
on the 27 of Aug. Anno Dom. 17—. 2Et. 32. 

In memory of Charles Mottey, Ob. Aug. 16, 1797. 
ML 15. 

To the memory of Elias, 2d son of the Rev. Joseph 
Mottey, who died Oct. 10, 1785, aged 18 months. 



IN LYNNFIELD CENTRE. 153 

Sacred to the memory of Mr. Charles E. Mottey, son 
of Rev. Joseph Mottey, who died at Salem July 19, 1804, 
on the morning after his arrival from a voyage to India, 
after an absence of 12 months, employed as clerk to the 
Captain of the ship Henry, JEt. 18. 

Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Betsey Cox, wife of Mr. 
Matthew Cox and daughter of Rev. Joseph Mottey, who 
died March 29, 1807, Mi. 20. 

In memory of Miss Hannah Mottey, aged 76. On whom 
the drama of life closed the 18 of November, 1835. 

Id memory of Sarah F. daughter of Daniel Needham, 
who died Oct. 10, 1802. Mi. 12 years. 

Here lyes buried y e body of M r . Thomas Newhall, who 
departed this life Nov br 30 th 1738, in y e 58 lb year of his 
age. 

Sacred to the memory of Mr. John Orne, whose remains 

are here deposited, who departed this life Feb. the 11 th 

1735, aged 55 years. 

Insidious grave how dost thou rend in sunder 
Whom love has knit and sympathy made one. 

Sacred to the memory of John Orne, Esq., who quitted 
this scene of mortality Dec. 1, 1812. ML 36. 

Reader if love of worth thy bosom warm, 
If virtue please thee or if friendship charm, 
Upon this marble drop a tender tear, 
Worth, virtue, friendship, all are buried here. 
"Verily there is a reward for the righteous." 

In memory of Mrs. Pamela Orne, consort of John Orne, 
who died Oct. 10, 1810. Mt. 34. 

To perpetuate her memory we celebrate the social, moral & christian 
virtues. 

oisr. coix. xxiv 10* 



154 INSCRIPTIONS FROM GRAVESTONES 

To the memory of Mrs. Bridget Orne, widow of Mr. 
John Orne, who died Oct. 27, 1826. Mt. 83. 

When Christ, who is our life, shall appear, 
Then shall ye also appear with him in glory. 

In memory of John, son of Mr. John Orne, who died 
Jan. 22, 1811, aged 1 year, 7 months. 

In memory of Eliza Ford, daughter of John Orne, who 
died Nov. 24, 1810, aged 2 months. 

Hubbard Emerson. iEt. 4 weeks. 

Helen Emerson. 2Et. 8 months. 

Here lyes buried the body of John Perkins, Physician, 
who departed this life Jan. 23 d 1781, in y e 84 th year of his 
age. 

In memory of Deacon John Perkins, who died Sept. 4, 
1823, Mt. 83. 

In memory of Eunis, widow of Deacon John Perkins, 
who died Aug. 16, 1827, Mt. 84. 

Sacred to the memory of William Perkins, son of Mr. 
John and Mrs. Eunice Perkins, who died Oct. 23, 1794, 
in the 15 th year of his age. 

In memory of Miss Anna Perkins, who died Aug. 10 th 
1792, Aged 21 years. 

This stone erected in memory of Henry Perkins. Obt. 
July 1, 1796. Mt. 11. 

Beneath this stone is deposited the remains of Mrs. 
Abigail Perkins. Obt. Aug. 9, 1803, Mt. 21. 



IN LYNNFIELD CENTRE. 155 

In memory of Beuj am in Perkins, A. B., who died on 
the 17 th of Nov. 1809, aged 20. 

Could genius, science and virtue ensure length of days this stone 
would not have been thus early marked. 

Here lyes buried y e body of Dea con John Pearson, who 
died June 21 st Anno Dom* 1728, aged 78 years. 

Here lyes interr'd the body of Captain Timothy Poole, 
Esq., Dea con of y e 2 d Church in Lynn, who departed this 
life Feb r * 28 th Anno Dom ni 1753, 2Et. 50. 

Blessed are y e dead which die in y e Lord. Yea, saith y e spirit 
that they may rest from their labours, and their works do follow them. 
Rev. 14, 13. 

Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Elizabeth Poole, Relict 
of Timothy Poole Esq r , who died May 31, A.D. 1796, 
in the 90 year of her age. 

Timothy Poole, son of Cap* Timothy and M rs Eliza- 
beth Poole, died Sept. 10 th , 1736, aged 3 years, 2 months 
& 4 days. 

In memory of Amos Smith, who died March 9, 1798, 
aged 73. This stone is erected by his daughter, Nabby 
Parsons. 

Here lyes buried y e body of y e Rev nd M r Nathaniel 
Sparhawk, who departed this life May 7 th Anno Dom 1 
1732, in y e 38 th year of his age. 

Here lyes the body of M rs Elizabeth Sparhawk, Relict 
to y e Rev nd M r Nathaniel Sparhawk, who departed this life 
May y e 12 th 1768, in the 68 th year of her age. 

112th Psalm, 6 v « rBe Ye Righteous shall be held in everlasting re- 
membrance. 



156 LYNNFIELD CENTRE INSCRIPTIONS. 

Nathaniel Sparhawk, son of y e Rev d M r Nathaniel Spar- 
hawk & M rs Elizabeth his wife, died Deeem ber 11, 1728 in 

ye ^th y ear Q f Jjjg a g e# 

In memory of Mr. Ebenezer Swinerton, who died Nov. 
12, 1795, aged 66 years. 

Sacred to the memory of Mr. Daniel Townsend, who 
was slain at the Battle of Lexington, April 19 th 1775, 
aged 36. 

Lie, valiant Townsend, in the peaceful shades ; we trust, 

Immortal honors mingle with thy dust. 

What though thy body struggled in its gore? 

So did thy Saviour's body, long before ; 

And as he raised his own, by power divine, 

So the same power shall also quicken thine, 

And in eternal glory mayst thou shine. 

Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Zeruiah Townsend, relic 
of Mr. Daniel Townsend, who died Oct r , 19 th 1775, aged 
31 years. 

Death has my life now swept away, 

To follow my companion dear ; 
But Christ can bear my soul away, 

And land it on the heavenly shore. 

Here lyes buried y e body of M r John Upton, who de- 
parted this life March 27 th 1743, aged 60 years and 16 d s . 

John Upton, died April 30, 1838, aged 92 years. 

Sally, wife of John Upton, deposited on the right, died 
March 26, 1799, aged 51 years. 

Hannah, wife of John Upton, deposited on the left, 
died Sept. 17, 1837, aged 89 years. 



PAY ROLL OF CAP T JN° DODGE'S COMPANY OF GUARDS 
FOUND AMONG THE PAPERS OF ENOS GALLOP, 1834. 



Muster Eoll for Pay Due to the Non-commission d Officers 
& Soldiers in Cap* Jn° Dodges Company Col° Jacob Ger- 
rishes Reg* of Guards from the State of Massachusetts 
Bay at y e Rate of 40 S per month from the first day of 
April, 1778 until July as may appear by my Muster Roll. 



No. 


NAMES. 


TIME OF SERVICE. 

Months 1 Days 


WHOLE PAY. 

I s d 


1 


David Perkins 


3 


3 


6 


4 


2 


Joseph York 


3 


2 


6 


2 8 


3 


Jona thn moulton 


3 


3 


6 


4 


4 


Sam 1 Low 


2 


27 


5 


16 


5 


Andrew Millet 


3 


2 


6 


2 8 


6 


Obediah More 


3 


2 


6 


2 8 


7 


Daniel Gould 


2 


26 


5 


14 8 


8 


Amos Capman 


2 


26 


5 


14 8 


9 


W m Farley 


3 


1 


6 


1 4 


10 


Moses hodgkins 


3 


1 


6 


1 4 


11 


W m Tarr 


3 


4 


6 


5 4 


12 


Francees Morgan 


3 


4 


6 


5 4 


13 


Daniel Eow 


3 


4 


6 


5 4 


14 


Stephen Row 


3 


4 


6 


5 4 


15 


Jerem h Persons 


3 


4 


6 


5 4 


16 


W m Steel 


3 


4 


6 


5 4 


17 


Jacob Lurvy 


3 


4 


6 


5 4 


18 


Daniel Tucker 


3 


4 


6 


5 4 


19 


Caleb Harradean 


3 


4 


6 


5 4 


20 


Benj n Witham 


3 


4 


6 


5 4 


21 


Benj n Foster 


3 


4 


6 


5 4 


22 


Joseph Stephens 


3 


4 


6 


5 4 


23 


Benj m Smith 


3 


4 


6 


5 4 


24 


Charles Linton 


3 


4 


6 


5 4 


25 


Moses Foster 


3 


4 


6 


5 4 


£154 


4 



(157) 



158 



PAY ROLL OF CAPT. JNO. DODGE'S 



No. 


NAMES. 


TIME OF 
Months 


SERVICE. 
Days 


WHOLE PAT. 

£ 1 s d 


26 


Bemsly Perkins 


3 


4 


6 


5 4 


27 


John Robinson 


3 


4 


6 


5 4 


28 


Joshua Poland 


3 


4 


6 


5 4 


29 


Moses May 


3 


3 


6 


4 


30 


Seward Dow 


3 


3 


6 


4 


31 


Dudley Wildes 


3 


3 


6 


4 


32 


Moses Perkins 


3 


3 


6 


4 


33 


Robert Perkins 


3 


3 


6 


4 


34 


Sam 1 Hood 


3 


3 


6 


4 


35 


John Carpenter 


3 


3 


6 


4 


36 


Thorn 8 Perkins 


3 


3 


6 


4 


37 


Solom* Coleman 


3 


3 


6 


4 


38 


Nath 1 Grant 


3 


3 


6 


4 


39 


Jesse Dodge 


3 


3 


6 


4 


40 


Thorn 8 Tewksbury 


3 


3 


6 


4 


41 


John Lakeman 


3 


3 


6 


4 


42 


John Peabody 


3 


3 


6 


4 


43 


Sam 1 Day 


3 


3 


6 


4 


44 


Will m Hodgkins 


3 


3 


6 


4 


45 


Amos Gallop 


3 


3 


6 


4 


46 


Eanos Gallop 


3 


3 


6 


4 


47 


Thorn 8 Knowlton 


3 


3 


6 


4 


48 


Michal holland 


3 


3 


6 


4 


49 


Simeon Baker 


3 


3 


6 


4 


50 


Winthrp Serjeant 


3 


2 


6 


2 8 


£155 


2 8 



COMPANY OF GUARDS. 



159 



No. 


NAMES. 


TIME OF SERVICE. 

Months [ Days 


WHOL 

£ 


EPAY. 

S d 


51 


Edmond Pool 


3 


2 


6 


2 8 


52 


Francies Dodge 


3 


2 


6 


2 8 


53 


John freeman 


3 


2 


6 


1 4 


54 


Ephraim Brown 


3 


1 


6 


1 4 


55 


Will"* Dodge 


3 


1 


6 


1 4 


56 


John knowlton 


3 


1 


6 


1 4 


57 


Amos Dwinel 


2 


29 


5 


18 8 


58 


Moses Andress 


2 


29 


5 


18 8 


59 


Thorn 8 Dodge 


2 


28 


5 


17 4 


60 


Natha 1 Lane 


2 


28 


5 


17 4 


61 


Egnatiaus harraden 


2 


28 


5 


17 4 


62 


Isaac Row 


2 


28 


. 5 


17 4 


63 


Henry Tarr 


2 


28 


5 


17 4 


64 


Thom 3 Burnham 


2 


27 


5 


16 


65 


Enoch Burnham 


2 


27 


5 


16 


66 


Jonathan Burnham 


2 


27 


5 


16 


67 


John Burnham 


2 


27 


5 


16 


68 


Asa Low 


2 


27 


5 


16 


69 


John Cogswell 


2 


27 


5 


16 


70 


John Davis 


2 


27 


5 


16 


71 


Thorn 3 Foster 


2 


27 


5 


16 


72 


Elisha Gould 


2 


26 


5 


14 8 


73 


Aaron Conant 


2 


20 


5 




74 


John Dodge 


3 


2 


6 


2 8 


Foot 


brought forward 


£141 









155 


2 8 






154 


4 










£450 


6 8 r 



SALEM MILITARY COMPANY. 



NAMES OF THE VOLLUNTEER ARTILLERY CORPS. 



OFFICERS. 



Capt Joseph Ropes 
l 3t Lt. Edw d Stanley 



2 d lt J. M. Fairfield 
3 lt J. Shepard, Jr 



Joseph Noble 
Tim Wellman 
Jesse Smith 
Nath 1 Garland 
Curtis Searl 
Wm. Silver 
John Reith 
Rich d Smith 
Edw d Smith 
Wm. Sumner 
Frederick Coombs 
John Foster 
Joseph Jaques 
George Williams 
Jeathro Pearsons 
Rob 4 Upton 
Elip h Davis 
David Cummings 
Jon a Shillaber 
Jon 1 Gardner Jn r 
John Edwards 
Geo : Rice 
James Hanscom 
John Frin ks 
Joseph Perkins 
Eben r Hathorne 
Tho 9 Bowditch 
Jeduthau Upton 
John Upton 
William Allen 
(100) 



Jon a Andrew 
Israel Ward 
Tim Greenleaf 
Wm. Dawson 
James Ford 
W m Foster 
W m Webb 
Benj n Upton 
Henry Tibbets 
Gam. H. Ward 
Dan 1 Sage 
Eben r Slocom 
George Hodges Jn r 
Sam 1 Herron 
Francis Lemot 
Phillip Manning 
Allex r Donaldson 
Jon a Brown Jn r 
Abner Kneeland 
Sam 1 Kehow 
Charles Treadwell 
Tho 3 Trask 
James Brown Jn r 
John C. Burke 
John Ropes Jn r 
Charles F. Wilson 
Joseph J. Knap 
Charles Busk 
Henry Prince Jn r 
Robert Peele Ju r 



Wm. Johnson 
Jesse Smith 3 d 
Andrew Dunlap 
Sam 1 Phippen 
Joseph Vincent j r 
Will m Hathorne j r 
Jacob Agge 
Clifford C. Byrne 
Jos h Gilman 
Joshua Webb 
Joseph E. Sprague 
Matthew Vincent 
Sam 1 Cates 
John Hovey 
Ellis Mansfield 
W m Luscomb 
Joseph Jaynes 
Asa Flanders 
Peter Farnham 
Benj Guptil 
Ja 3 Wittle 
Ja 3 Trask 
John Green 
Moses Smith 
Neh h Hutchinson 
John Mount 
Stephen Field 
Nathan Frye Jr 
W m Bentley 
Jn° Howard 



OF THE 

ESSEX INSTITUTE. 

Vol. XXIY. July, Aug., Sept,, 1887. Nos. 7, 8, 9. 



GLEANINGS RELATIVE TO THE FAMILY OF ADAM HAWKES, 

ONE OF THE EARLY SETTLERS OF THE THIRD 

PLANTATION OF MASSACHUSETTS BAY. 

CONTRIBUTED BY 
NATHAN M. HAWKES. 



Adam Hawkes, the founder of the numerous and respect- 
able family that bears the name throughout the country, 
was one of the advance guard of hard-headed Englishmen 
who, for liberty of conscience — not loving England less 
but freedom more — took wife and children and household 
gods, braved the perils of trackless seas, dared the wiles 
of a savage race in an unknown world, and sowed the seed 
that has grown the highest civilization the earth has yet 
known. 

He was one of the seventeen hundred Puritans who 
sailed with Winthrop from Southampton and landed at 
Salem in June, 1630. 

He received large grants in the division of the common 
land and during his busy life acquired other tracts as ap- 
pear by the antique and curious inventory and division of 
his estate which we give from the original records. 

HIST. COLL. XXIV U (161) 



162 GLEANINGS FEOM 






Articles of Agreement by which the original estate was 
divided in 1672. 

Division of the Estate of Adam Hawkes, late of Lynn, de- 
ceased, made 27th March, 1672. 

Artickles of agreement, as touching the estate of Adam 
Hawks, of Lyn, late deceased, as followeth : John Hawks, 
of Lyn, is agreed (with the consent of this Honored Court, 
to administer upon the said estate, and John Hawks is to 
paye unto the severall persons conserned, as are hereafter 
named (viz.) to give unto his mother, Mrs. Sarah Hawks, 
a parcell of upland containeing nine skoare acres more or 
lesse lying in Lyn bounds, not joineing to the fearms, and 
eight acres of meadow lying in the great medow so called, 
and one third part of all the moveable things contained in 
the Inventory, all which is unto the aforesaid Sarah and 
her heirs tor ever. 

2. John Hawks is to paye unto Sarah Hawks, daughter 
unto the said widow, fower skoare and ten pounds, (viz) 
to pay unto the said Sarah, or her mother, five pounds the 
next twenty day of June, and from which time at the end 
of every tow years five pounds, till forty pounds is payd; 
and the other forty pounds is to be payd unto the said 
Sarah at eighteen years of age, or at her marig daye, and 
if the said Sarah should dye before either time, that then 
the said some or somes as aforesaid is to be payed unto 
Sarah Hawks, widow or her asignes, all to be payed in 
corne or cattell valued, if the tow partys agree not at his 
now dwelling house 

3. John Hawks is to deliver and sett out unto Moses 
Hawks, his sonn, which he had by rebeckah Hawks, 
daughter of Mr. Moses Mavericke and his heirs for ever 
one haulf part of that fearme which the said Hawks lived 
and died upon, boath upland and medow and houseing be- 



THE FAMILY OF ADAM HAWKES. 163 

ing in Lyn, only for the houseing the said Hawks is to 
paye the value thereof if he please, all of which is to be 
don when the aforesaid Moses corns to twenty and one 
years of age and if it please god the said Moses dye be- 
fore the age of one and twenty years, the said estate is to 
goe unto his father John Hawks, and his children forever, 
this aforesaid guift is the legacy of Mr. Adam Hawks to 
his grandchild Moses Hawks. 

4. John Hawkes is to paye unto Mr. William Cogswell 
for the use of his wife the some of fower skoare and ten 
pounds that is as folio weth, to pay ten pounds the twenty 
fift of march next, and so from year to yeare, every twenty 
fift of march till the aforesaid some be payed, all which 
is to be payed in corne cattell or goods at the now dwell- 
ing house of John Hawks. 

5. John Hawks is to pay unto ffrances Huchisson twenty 
pounds to be payd in corne cattell or goods at price cur- 
rant at the now dwelling house of John Hawks, the one 
haulf part to be payed the twenty ninth day of September 
next, and the other haulf part the same day twelf month 
after. 

6. John Hawks is to pay unto Sam well Huchisson five 
pounds to be payed in a twelf months time in corn or 
cattell, at the now dwelling house of John Hawks. 

7. John Hawks is to Thomas Huchisson five pounds in 
corne or cattell in a twelf months time at the now dwell- 
ing house of John Hawks. 

8. John Hawks is to paye unto Edward Huchisson five 
pounds in corne or cattell — at the now dwelling house of 
John Hawks in a twelf months time. 

9. John Hawks is to paye unto Elizabeth Hart five 
pounds in corne or cattell within a twelf months time at 
the now dwelling house of John Hawks 

Lastly all the rest of the estate of Adam Hawks de- 
ceased, contained in the said Inventory, boarth of houseing, 



164 GLEANINGS FEOM 

lands, and other goods, not in this writeing given awaye 
is hereby confeirmed unto the aforesaid John Hawks and 
his heirs for ever as witness all or hands this 27 : March: 
1672 

Sarah x Hawks ffrancis Hutchinson 

her mark 
Moses Mavericke 
John hawkes William Cogswell 

This aproved, alowed, and confirmed by the cowrt to 
all the ptyes in court att Ipswich the 27 of March 1672 

Eobert Lord, Cler : 

A true Inventory of the estat of Mr. Adam Hawks de- 
ceased taken this 18 of March 1671-72. 
Imprimis in wearing Aparill . . . .5170 
In a bedsteed and ffether bed and -fflock bed 2 
fether pillows an on blanket and sheetts 
and curtins and vallance and ane Imbroad- 
ered couerlid . . . * . 14 

An other bedsteed and beding belonging to it 7 10 
trundell bed and beding belonging to it . 2 10 

other bed and bedsteed . . . . 3 

bras and pewter . . . . . 3 14 

Iron potts and kettells one pare of Andirons 
pare of trammell stow par of pott hoxs 
one cast backe on friing pan one *are of 
Stilliards one spitt . * . . . 5 7 
*tow Croscut Saws one Sith and *ne sikell thre 
Axces to par of hoks And one Axtre pin on 
sledge and ould Iron . . . . 1110 

And to tow muakits And tow small ffowling 

p.cs tow rest heads . . . . 3 15 

To thre swords one wach bill on ould belt And 

one pistell and one Drum . . . 2 13 

To one Table and six Joyn Stools . . 2 2 



THE FAMILY OF ADAM HAWKES. 



165 



To one cubbard one Joynd Chear one Chest 

Table cloth and napkins and tow snapsaks 

Into a bible and other books 

one press tow small tables tow chairs . 

In a pare of banddilars in milk wessels and 

sids ....... 

A peas of black cloth .... 

cart wheells plow and yoke chayns levis and 

pin beatell and tow weges *nd one forke and 

part of a cart Eoop .... 
*nd to fowr Oxcen ..... 
Seven Cows with tow sucking calfs . 
one tow yerling and tow yerlings 
*ow horses and tow mares 
Sixten Swyn one with another 
Sadell and pillion at .... 

loking glas and baskett .... 
*n Tobakow and ould Cake 
The Dwelling Hows and barne 
bout nyn Hundred of boards and thre stoks 

of bees ...... 

ftve hundred and ffiuty Akers of land and 

medow by estimation being more or less whe 

vallue at . 
*nd fowr Akers of oupland more 
Creditt to the Esstatt . . 1 15 

Debts from the estatt . . 46 14 

This inventory was taken by us whose nams 
are under written the day and year above 



wrighten. 
witness our 
hands 



2 


8 


1 


7 


1 





2 


8 





14 


1 


6 


5 


18 


21 





24 


10 


4 


5 


17 





9 








15 





7 





18 


20 






2 16 



550 

2 








817 11 



Thomas Newhall, Jeremiah Sweyen. 



The doings of the early comers and of their successors 
are not matters of tradition but of history and record, so 



166 GLEANINGS FROM 

clear that we can read their lives as if they were contem- 
poraries. 

Of this first Adam Hawkes for instance, we know the 
little knoll where he built his house ; we know of the 
burning of that house ; of the flight through the snow 
with his wife and infant children. We know when his 
second house was erected. This house sheltered some of 
his kindred for more than two hundred years. 

In 1872 the old house was taken down and on one of 
the bricks of the chimney was found the date 1601, evi- 
dently written in the soft clay with the finger when the 
brick was made in England. These bricks which were in 
the first house were relaid in the fourth chimney upon the 
same farm by Richard Hawkes of the sixth generation 
from the original owner. It is a matter of history that 
some of the ships of Winthrop's fleet were ballasted with 
brick and it has always been known in this family that the 
bricks in the first chimney came from England. 

The farm is on the Saugus River, and the bricks must 
have been carried up that stream in boats as there was no 
road. 

Another relic of the original chimney which has orna- 
mented its successors, but which is now guarded as an heir- 
loom, is an iron fireback of about two feet square and 
weighing about one hundred pounds, on which is moulded 
what has been supposed to be the British arms but which 
has since been concluded to be some coat of arms, per- 
haps that of the Hawkes family. 

The "supporters," though not distinct, seem to be simi- 
lar to those in the British arms, but instead of the crown 
this is surmounted by what appears to be the vizors and 
bars of a helmet and lion. 

This casting was evidently made to lay in masonry as the 
edge is depressed and rough. 

The fashion of ornamenting the chimney back above the 



THE FAMILY OF ADAM HAWKES. 167 

fire with the family arms or something national was com- 
mon in early colonial times, probably borrowed from 
"home." 

The writer of this was walking in the dense woods, up- 
on the border of the great Lynn Forest when one of those 
ugly yet substantial stone walls, that are so common in 
New England, was reached. At an angle of the wall he 
looked to the north and to the west and the lines of rude 
masonry were unbroken. 

He asked of his guide, who is more familiar with the 
lore of the family and of the country round about than 
any other person, by whom and when it was built. "By 
John, the son of the first settler, in 1688." 

Unseen, save by the too few lovers of nature, that old 
wall still guarding his children's heritage is a better monu- 
ment to the pluck, energy and thrift of the founders of 
America than any flattering eulogy in the church-yard. 
Two hundred years it has withstood the rigors of the cli- 
mate and looks as if it might stand forever. 

Far happier was the lot of these sturdy pioneers than 
that of their brethren in the mother country who had just 
passed through the horrors of the civil wars and in that 
very year banished the last of the Stuarts from the throne. 
Truly there are sermons in stones. 

The descendants of this John Hawkes can trace their 
ancestry to the immortal compact signed in the cabin of 
the Mayflower. The wife of John was Rebecca, daugh- 
ter of Moses Maverick, the founder and for many years 
the only magistrate of Marblehead. The wife of Moses 
Maverick was the daughter of Isaac Allerton, who was 
one of the Mayflower passengers and was Lieutenant 
Governor of Plymouth Colony, and for a long time the 
agent of the colony. 

Isaac Allerton and Moses Maverick were conspicuous 



168 GLEANINGS FROM 

figures in the early days and their blood mingled with that 
of the successors of Thomas Hawkes, who was burned at 
the stake, in the reign of "Bloody Queen Mary, " for his 
faithfulness to his religious principles, and made a race fit 
to struggle for a new world. 

On the 28th and 29th days of July, A. D., 1880, there 
took place a reunion of the family which is described as 
follows in the Lynn Reporter of July 30 : 

HAWKES FAMILY REUNION. 

THE GATHERING OF THE CLANS AT NORTH SAUGUS. 

All parts of the country represented — The Literary Ex- 
ercises — Hon. N. M. Hawkes' Address. 

Wednesday was the first day of the reunion of the 
Hawkes family at the ancestral homestead at Saugus, and 
about three hundred people were present by afternoon. 
The homestead has been in possession of the Hawkes fam- 
ily, without intermission, for two hundred and fifty years 
and it is now occupied by Louis P. Hawkes. The situa- 
tion is a charming one, about a mile and a half out on the 
Lynnfield road from Saugus Centre. Instead of the rude 
cabin in which Adam Hawkes lived in 1630, is now a spa- 
cious two and a half story dwelling, with barn and other 
buildings near at hand. 

The porch of the dwelling is festooned with the Amer- 
ican and the English flags. Croquet, swings and other 
forms of amusement for the younger people in the front 
lawn were taken advantage of yesterday by a good num- 
ber. In a field to the south of the house is a large dining 
tent, which is under the control of caterer Palfray of Lynn. 
This place accommodates the visitors to three meals a day. 
To the westward of the house and upon a small hill are 
one large and several smaller tents, for sleeping accommo- 



THE FAMILY OF ADAM HAWKES. 169 

dations. At the entrance to this field is an arch, on which 
is inscribed : "1630— Hawkes Reunion— 1880." 

The scene about the homestead Wednesday was an ex- 
ceedingly pleasant one. There were reunions of those 
who had not met for years, and meetings of those who had 
never met before. The reception room was an interesting 
place for one to be, as he or she could note the arrivals 
from near and from far. Some parties would say, "We 
are from Ohio," from "Vermont," from "New York" from 
"Florida," or from some other state, city or town. Some 
would, of course, be recognized by their immediate rela- 
tives, while others would introduce themselves, and all 
would at once receive the heartiest of hearty greetings. 
All the New England states were represented, also New 
York, California, Florida, New Jersey, Illinois and Ohio. 
• There were no formal exercises on Wednesday, but the 
exercises on Thursday were carried out as follows : 9.30 
A.M., called to order by Samuel Hawkes ; singing ; prayer ; 
at 10.30, address of welcome by Samuel Hawkes ; introduc- 
tory address by Hon. N. M. Hawkes of Lynn, master of 
ceremonies ; genealogical address by Frederick Hawkes of 
Greenfield ; address on "The Character of our Ancestors," 
by Rev. W. S. Hawkes of South Hadley ; "The Hawkes' 
Military Record," by General George P. Hawkes of Tem- 
pleton; poem by Mary Hawkes. Dinner followed, after 
which Mrs. Nellie F. Lewis of Boston read a poem writ- 
ten by Miss Ella G. Hawkes, and two poems on "Our 
Family Jubilee" and "From Old England," by Sarah P. 
Hawkes, were also read. The literary exercises were 
highly interesting and creditable. At the conclusion of 
the exercises the reunion ended, most of the visitors start- 
ing at once for home. 

As the matter abstracted deals with the early family, we 

HIST. COLL. XXIV 11* 



170 GLEANINGS FROM 

venture to take extracts from the address delivered by N. 
M. Hawkes. 

"Two hundred and fifty years is a brief period when 
compared with eternity ; but it affords time for eight or 
nine generations of man to come and go, each more than 
half unheeding the reproduction in itself of the qualities, 
traits, figures, peculiarities of its predecessor. 

I count it a happy augury that the name of the Chris- 
tian's father of all men was the Christian name of the first 
of our own tribe, who dared the perils of an unknown 
ocean and a wild, new continent. Did we know nothing 
of the history of the founders of the Puritan common- 
wealth in Massachusetts Bay, their records would furnish 
data sufficient to construct an accurate theory of their mo- 
tives in coming here, and to reproduce their very lives. 

Adam Hawkes, one of the original settlers of Saugus, 
afterwards called Lynn, built his humble dwelling upon 
the spot where we stand, in the summer of 1630. There 
was nothing of riches, pomp or power attending his com- 
ing, neither is there in the gathering together of his de- 
scendants upon this, to us, cherished day and spot. 

We seek not to trace our lineage to some battered and 
tarnished armorial escutcheon. It is enough for us to 
know that Adam Hawkes must have been a good man to 
have been a man of consequence in that band of God- 
fearing, brave, hardy, intelligent men, who dared all for 
freedom of conscience. 

Our puritan ancestors sent no pioneers to spy out the 
country. They boldly embarked with their wives and 
little ones, with their household gods. They burned their 
bridges behind them. They knew no such words as fail 
or retreat. Composed mostly of well-to-do yeomanry, 
with advanced ideas of religious freedom, with the sancti- 



THE FAMILY OF ADAM HAWKES. 171 

fying ties of family, they founded a colony which grew, of 
necessity, into the most favored spot upon the earth for 
man's development. 

It is easy for us to judge with what intense tenacity 
these men clung to cherished institutions and habits, what 
a struggle it must have cost them to uproot, expatriate 
themselves, when we realize that for nine generations not 
the Hawkes family alone, but scores of others in Lynn and 
throughout the whole settlement, have claimed to own the 
soil that their ancestors first redeemed from the wilder- 
ness. We worship no dead past, but we respect our 
sturdy ancestors, and we point to this clinging to, this 
steadfast holding of possession, as an evidence that there 
was in the blood something that was worthy of perpetua- 
tion . 

Of course, when the hive is full the bees swarm. So, 
many have gone forth throughout the length and breadth 
of the land to follow various callings in life. All look 
back with pleasant longings to the old home ; a home in- 
deed, though never seen. Many a pilgrimage has been 
made to this spot by busy men who snatched the oppor- 
tunity from the too few leisure moments of life's turmoil. 

If, in these hasty and crude thoughts, I seem to skip from 
point to point without apparent heed of what was a steady 
progress, it is because the lives of our forefathers fill my 
imagination. Fresh scenes, dramatic they were, far be- 
yond our peaceful lives. I see those eleven vessels sailing 
out of Southampton harbor on that early spring day in 
1630, freighted with seventeen hundred Puritans. The 
prayers of those left behind went up for their safe arrival. 
Early in June they reached our shores. Bear in mind 
what such a passage meant then : no luxurious, swift, 
palace ocean steamers, no charts ; only the rudest com- 
passes, scarcely anything better than the sun by day and 



172 GLEANINGS FROM 

the moon by night to guide their path across the trackless 
waste ; huddled together in inconvenient little crafts in 
which to-day the poorest traveller would not sail upon the 
smoothest sea. 

Think for a moment of the privations they must have 
experienced in their voyage of from six to eight weeks. 
None looked back ; all were animated by a sublime faith 
in the rectitude of their purpose. It was a grander exo- 
dus, than that of the Israelites under Moses. The Israelites 
went out from a strange land, from under the bondage 
of the body, to a land dear to them as the home of their 
fathers, from which they had been forcibly torn. The Is- 
raelites believed that they followed the immediate direc- 
tion of an ever-present God who had made them His 
chosen people. The Puritans believed that all tongues 
and people might become children of grace ; that God was 
kind, and a father to all. They went out from the richest 
territory in the world ; they went out from comfortable, 
substantial homes — free in all except the liberty to wor- 
ship God according to their convictions ; they gave up all 
and went into the wilderness for this liberty. Better far 
the lot of the Puritans, who foreseeing, perhaps the com- 
ing storm, elected to combat nature, with all the mvste- 
rious unknown, than that of those who remained in the 
mother country and engaged in the fratricidal strife and 
deluged England in the blood of its best and noblest citi- 
zens. Cromwell and the Commonwealth indeed rendered 
England illustrious, but after a few brief years the inevi- 
table reaction came in the persons of Monk and Charles 
Stuart, and the yoke of Church and kingcraft again bore 
heavily upon old England. 

Though the colonies were nominally subject to the rule 
of the parent country, yet three thousand miles of watery 
barrier gave practical freedom which culminated in entire 



THE FAMILY OF ADAM HAWKES. 173 

freedom when the odious hand of despotism sought to as- 
sert its power in 1775. 

The Ee volution was not a contest between brethren. 
That was a struggle between the governing classes of 
England, backed by a hireling and foreign soldiery, and 
an English-speaking people grown broader and freer by 
an hundred and fifty years' life in the New World. 

The records of these men show that, in turning their 
backs upon the brewing storm at home, they were actuated 
by no mean motives ; for their lives reveal marvels of 
strength, endurance and heroism on every field of effort 
that tests the mettle of human nature. 

The world moves on with its tireless, uneasy activity, 
and should a stranger to our name chance to cast an idle eye 
upon our proceedings, he would be very apt to inquire 
What good can come of all this talk about the family of 
an obscure immigrant, of so long a time ago? We come 
together to compare notes, to exchange kindly greetings, 
to hold a good old-fashioned thanksgiving party, to see 
how we may avoid the errors of the past. In doing all 
these things it is but natural for us to look back to the 
patriarch from whom we all sprang, to seek to know what 
manner of man he was, to learn why his seed has been 
multiplied aud has enjoyed a respectable position in the 
community. Hence, as biographies in all time have been 
fascinating to those who study men and events, we turn, 
after a moment spent upon the general, to the particular, 
cause of our being gathered here to-day. 

Adam Hawkes pushed as far away from the seacoast as 
any of the original settlers. This fair valley caught his 
calculating farmer's eye. Its rich soil reminded him of 
his English home. He wisely built his house upon a little 
knoll that gave him a fair prospect over his broad acres. 
The spots about the farm bear to-day old English names, 



174 GLEANINGS FROM 

that, with the land, have been transmitted from father 
to son. The c Close' and the * Close Hill' were transplanted 
from Old England to New England. They will remain 
long" after the bricks and iron fireback, wrought with the 
Lion and the Unicorn, which he brought with him shall have 
perished. That word ? Close' is classic English, made 
so by the masters of the language. Macaulay says : 
* Closes surrounded by the venerable abodes of deans and 
canons.' 

And Shakespeare says : "I have a tree which grows here 
in my close, that mine own use invites me to cut down.' 
These little things show the attachment of the first settlers 
to the old country, and they show how well the good old 
ways have worn. 

The records of Lynn state that Adam Hawkes received 
large grants of land, and the court records indicate that, 
knowing his rights, he dared to maintain them ; for we 
find him from year to year, stoutly contending with the 
proprietors of the iron works, who had dammed up the 
winding Saugus river, and forced the water back upon his 
fertile meadows. He could not have been a timid, weak 
man to have thus, year after year, contested with this 
strong combination of capital. However much you may 
dislike the law, this trait of your ancestor in defending 
his rights proves that he was gritty and plucky. Such 
qualities are needed by pioneers, and required by men 
who would leave their impress upon their owii times, and 
upon posterity. 

The will of Adam reveals another old English trait. 
He left one son, John. John had some brothers and sis- 
ters of the half blood, that is, children of his mother, but 
not of his father. Adam provided for these children who 
had no legal claim upon him ; and then, for no other rea- 
son that I can conceive save the desire to prevent John in 



THE FAMILY OF ADAM HAWKES. 175 

his generosity from still further endowing these strangers 
to the name, and to ensure the land to the family for an- 
other generation, he gave one-half of all his houses and 
land to his eldest grandchild, Moses, the son of John, 
with the residue to John. The purpose to maintain, in 
some sense, the English law of primogeniture, is yet more 
apparent upon further examination of the genealogy of the 
family. Moses, the eldest son of John, was the only child 
of his mother, Rebecca Maverick, who died at his birth 
in 1659. 

John married again, and was blessed with several other 
sons, who inherited these lands where we are, while the 
northern portion of the farm continued in the family of 
Moses. Adam's evident desire was to keep a portion of 
the land as large as possible to the eldest son. 

This is the earliest and latest attempt to keep up the 
English land tenure in law, although in practice it must 
always exist when the land to be occupied is of limited 
extent ; so that some of each generation have taken the 
value of their portion in money or its equivalent, and de- 
parted elsewhere to seek their fortunes. The records of 
the court show that this division of the property was agreed 
to by all the interested parties. The settlement of prop- 
erty too often tears asunder family relations, and fills the 
court with litigation ; not so with this family, for so far as 
I can learn the example of Adam, John and Moses in this 
ancient time of 1671 established a precedent which has 
found no violators. If we have had any quarrels we have 
kept them from the dangerous atmosphere of the court 
room. This reminds me that I may have discovered a 
reason why, while we have so many ministers and doctors 
in the family, the lawyers cut so insignificant a figure. It 
is because we did not need to train our sons in legal lore. 
Honest yeoman habits were the common possession of each 



176 GLEANINGS FROM 

succeeding generation, and all agreed that equity and jus- 
tice were better than law so far as family dealings were 
concerned. I have not found a case where two of this 
family have been engaged in legal controversy. I cite this 
as a remarkable fact concerning so large a family covering 
so long a period, having property to contend about, yet 
absolutely free from litigation among themselves. 

On the other hand, the old Adam set the precedent of 
going to law with other people when they crowded him, 
which has been liberally followed by his kin of every de- 
gree even unto the present day. 

In the course of nature it became the lot of Adam 
Hawkes to pass over the great river that spares none. 
That he died in the odor of sanctity is attested by his 
neighbor, Thos. Newhall, who speaks in his quaint diary 
as follows : 

'Ask Mr. Whiting his mind on Indjan damnation, and 
ask him if sinn is sinn whether or no, be it from igno- 
rance or harduesse. Praise his discourse at Goodman 
Hawkes, his funerall.' 

Samuel Whiting, who preached this funeral sermon, 
was the noted divine in whose honor Lynn was named. 
It is safe to assume that in those stern days a man of Mr. 
Whiting's learning and eloquence would not have wasted 
his words upon an unworthy subject. He of whom he 
spoke was an active, respected parishioner. Other in- 
stances of the piety aud standing of your ancestors are 
matters of record. 

Church and state with our fathers were so intimately 
blended that seats in the church were assigned in town 
meeting. Those who, from worldly position or spiritual 
leadership, were deemed worthy of special positions were 
selected by the town ; the remainder of the people (for at- 
tendance at church was compulsory) were arranged by a 






THE FAMILY OF ADAM HAWKES. 177 



committee, as will be seen by the following extracts from 
the town records, 1692, January 8. 

The town did vote that Lieut. Fuller, Lieut. Lewis, 
Mr. John Hawkes, senior, Francis Burrill, Lieut. Burrill, 
John Burrill, Jr., Mr. Henry Rhodes, Quartermaster Bas- 
sett, Mr. Haberfield, Cornet Johnson, Mr. Bailey and 
Lieut. Blighe, should sit at the table." 

? It was voted that Matthew Farrington, senior, Henry 
Silsbee, and Joseph Mansfield, senior, should sit in the 
deacon's seat.' 

'It was voted that Thomas Farrar, senior, Crispus 
Brewer, Allen Breed, senior, Clement Coldam, Robert 
Rand, senior, Jonathan Hudson, Richard Hood, senior, 
and Sergeant Haven should sit in the pulpit.' 

'The town voted that them that are surviving, that was 
chosen by the town a Committee to erect the meeting house, 
and Clark Potter to join along with them, should seat the 
inhabitants of the town in the meeting house, both men 
and women, and appoint what seats they shall sit in, but 
it is to be understood that they are not to seat neither the 
table, nor the deacon's seat, nor the pulpit, but them to 
sit there as are voted by the town.' 

These records illustrate several interesting facts ; they 
show how the old names are still familiar names in Lynn ; 
they tell us of Indian wars by the frequency of military 
titles ; they reveal what the good people of Lynn were 
about while the neighboring town of Salem was in the 
midst of the horror of the so called witchcraft excitement ; 
and they show to you, clansmen, the head of the second 
generation of the Hawkes family sitting with the elders 
' and the dignitaries of the church. 

Even in later times, when the Puritan hold upon the 

• people was loosening, we still kept an active place in 

church affairs. In 1739 the Third or West parish in Lynn 

HIST. COLL. XXIV - 12 



178 GLEANINGS FROM 

was formed, being that part of Lynn now Saugus, and 
Moses Hawkes of the fourth generation was one of the 
1 committee to draw up some proposals for the settlement 
of a minister amongst us.' John Hawkes and Elkanah 
Hawkes were also active members at this period. Jona- 
than Hawkes served as parish clerk from 1749 to 1756. 
Nathan Hawkes, Thomas Hawkes and the widow Hannah 
Hawkes were pew owners in 1783. Nathan Hawkes was 
parish clerk in 1790, an office which his namesake will 
never attain. Nathan Hawkes was one of a committee to 
reconcile differences after the death of Parson Eoby. Dur- 
ing the pastorate of Nathaniel Henchman several persons 
were ■ exempted from paying towards his support, being 
Quakers/ Among these was Ebenezer Hawkes, and Eb- 
enezer's descendants have remained faithful to the peculiar 
doctrines of the Friends to this day ; another little incident 
I mention to throw light upon the changes which years 
bring about in our habits : in 1780 Ebenezer Hawkes, 
Quaker though he was, was a slave owner. 

Lest I should be accused of trenching upon the preserves 
of the clergy present, I forbear giving any more orthodox 
reminiscences, as some one might retort by relating mod- 
ern free-thinking anecdotes. 

The story of those early days is an open book to the 
student who has the leisure to read its fascinating pages. 
In it, my brethren, you will find nothing of which you 
may not be proud. Most of us are too busy in the bread 
and butter struggle of to-day to devote the proper time and 
attention to its details. We shall do well if we live up to 
the standard set for our example by those who have gone 
before. This day is a mile-stone that marks our march 
of a quarter of a thousand years of American life. Indi- 
viduals and generations lay down the burdens, the failures 
and the triumphs of life ; others stand ready to go on with 
the duties that citizenship and family command. Let us 



THE FAMILY OF ADAM HAWKES. 179 

signalize this occasion as a family by new reverence for 
the memory of our ancestors, and by new resolves to make 
our name a still better name in the future than in the past. 
Let us sanctify the present by making it worthy of the 
past, ever hopeful of the unseen, wonderful future. 

Within five miles of the ebb and flow of the Atlantic, 
whence civilization took its westward course, this sylvan 
retreat has hitherto escaped the rush and crush of busy 
mercantile pursuits ; the snort of the locomotive is unheard ; 
the primitive solitude is undisturbed save by the peaceful 
pursuits of agriculture. 

The oratories of the Jews were beneath the shadow of 
olive trees ; the ancient Druids of Gaul, Britain, and Ger- 
many were accustomed to perform their mystic rites and 
sacrifices in the recesses of the forest ; and our Pilgrim 
Fathers worshipped God under a like canopy. 

We meet to-day under the shade of the walnut. May 
this spot be spared from the sordid pursuits of business, 
may this grove be unvexed by the demands of utility for 
another period of two hundred and fifty years, that our 
successors may gather here in "Nature's noblest sanctuary," 
and may our kin in all coming time resort to this Mecca 
of the Hawkes family in America." 

The family name like all the surnames of the colonial 
days was spelled to suit the taste of the user. There 
were not so many variations as in most of the familiar 
names. In England we find it Hawkes, which has been 
generally followed here. Some branches of the family in 
America call it Hawks. This saves a letter but does not 
make the word any handsomer. Hawke may be the same 
tribe. 

No thorough genealogy of this family has yet been ar- 
ranged. The materials however are ample and as a sam- 
ple we give the pedigree of a pupil of the Lynn High 
School who has mainly prepared this article. 






180 GLEANINGS FROM THE FAMILY OF ADAM HAWKES. 



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EARLY RECORDS OF THE CHURCH IN 
TOPSFIELD. 






COMMUNICATED BY JOHN H. GOULD. 



At a Lawfull Town meeting y e 7 May 1680, The Towne 
Manifested by voat that thay ware not willing Mr Hub- 
bard Should Continare in y e work of y e ministry here at 
Topsfield without Mr Hubbard and y e Towne can agree in 
a More Christian way than thay bee in at present, the 
Towne by vote doe declare that if mr hobard desire a town 
meeting he may disare with the towne if hee apopint a day 
the next weeke thay will meet with him if he give notis 
on Saboth day next 7 May 1680. 

"At a lawfull town meeting the forth of May 1681 En- 
signe Goold and Sargen John Redington ar chosen to go 
to mr apes at Salem to see if he will apcapt of a call to the 
menestre here. 

At a lawfull towne meeting the 17 of June 1681 Ensigne 
Goold and Isack este are chosen to goo to Mester danel 
apes to se if he will com to help us in Respact of the men- 
istri everi other Saboth or oftener if he can in order to a 
forther axperianc of ech other Voted. 

At a Lawfull Town Meeting y e 29 of July 1681, Thomas 
Perkins jur and Joseph Bixby Jun r are chosen to goe to 
Cambrig to pilot mr Capen to Topsfield to Lieut Pebodys 
house. 

Lieut Pebody Deckon perkins Sargt Redington Jame 
How Senr mr Tho Baker John Gould Sargt Pebody Sam- 
uel Busell Senr John Wilds John How Joche (Joshua?) 

(181) 



182 EARLY RECORDS OF THE 






Estey Gierke are chosen a Commitey to discorse with mr 
Capen to Stay and preach here with us at Topsfield a while. 

At a lawfull towne meeting the fift of Sapember 1681 
Sargen Redington Jacob towne Senr and John how or ani 
two of them ar chosen to acompeni mr Capen to dorches- 
ter when hee goes to viset his frendes and to bring him 
agane if tha can with his frends Consent to Contene with 
us in the ministri 20 June 1682 Town granted to Mr Capen 
twelve acres of upland & medow if he settle amongst us. 

At a Lawfull meeting of y e Selectmen y e 20 of decem- 
ber 1681, Ensigne John Gould and Isaac Easty Sener are 
chosen to go to mr Jerymyah Hobbard to demand the key 
of the parsonidge house. Voted. 

mr Capen answer to y e Church & Towne & neiaghdr of 
ye viliag & Ipswich. In Answer to y e motion of y e Church 
& Towne of Topsfield and y e Neighbors of Rowly village 
& Ipswich Sept 18 : An do 1682 

Having taken into serious Consideration y e motion which 
hath been made by your selves to me in order to y e work 
of y e ministry among you having also to y e utmost of my 
understanding & abillity eyed & observed both y e word & 
y e providences of God in order thereunto : and Although 
I am greatly Sensible of my inabillity and Insufficiency to 
so great a worke, yet Seeing it is God who hath by his 
providence brought mee into y e Same & not seeing my way 
Clear to break of from that worke, Considering also y e 
Continuance of yo r Love & good Affection to mee having 
also been Earnest with that God & wich directeth his in all 
their wayes & Setteth bounds to y e habitations of all men 
for guidance, Counsell & Direction in this great Affair : 
Waighing all these things together I do Intend if God shall 
continue mee in this worke by Assitting & inabling mee 
there unto to Continue with you in the worke of y e Gos- 
pell in order to a farther Settlement in God own time un- 






CHURCH IN TOPSFIELD. 



183 



less anything Shall Intervene which Shall bee accounted by 
Indiffarant & Import all Judgments to bee Just ground & 
Sufficient Eeason to obstruct any proceedings of that Na- 
ture Joseph Capen. 

16 May 1684 The Towne did manifest by voat that they 
war willing to proseed to ordanationwith mr Joseph Capen. 



1684r. 

A LIST OF Y E MEMBERS IN FULL COMMUNION AT TOPSFIELD WHEN I 
WAS FIRST ORDAIND, OR Y T WERE ADMITTED AFTERWARDS. 



Francis Pabody 

John Reddington 

Abraham Reddington Sen r 

Joseph Bixby Sen r 

John Gould Sen r 

Thomas Baker 

Thomas Perkins Deacon died May 
7th 86 

John Pabody 

Thomas Dorman 

Ephraim Dorman 

Samuel Howlett 

William Howlett 

Isaak Cumins 

John French 

Isaak Estie 

James How Sen r 

Samuell Perley 

Nehemiah Abbot 

John Cummins Decern 7, 85 was 
dismiss** to ye church at Dun- 
stable 

Robert Stiles 

Thomas Perkins Jun r 

Daniell Hovey 

Deacon Perkins wife 



Sen 



Lieftenant (John) Goulds wife 
Tho Dormans wife 
Isaak Esties " 
Jacob Towns " 
Joseph Towns " 
Widdow Mary Towne 
Ephraim Dormans wife 
John Wilds his 
James How 
Michael Dunnels 
John Nichols 
Daniell Bormans 
Isaak Cummins 
William Howletts 
Abraham Reddingtons wife 
Joseph Bixbys wife 
John Pabody s " 
Samuell Simons his wife 
Robert Smiths " 

William Smith " 

Widdow Andrews 
Nehemiah Abbots wife 
Widdow Perley 
William Watson his wife 
John French " " 

Johu Cummins " " 



184 



EARLY RECORDS OF THE 





BAPTISMS. 






John Curtiss 


his Rebecka 


May 


6 1688 


Samuell Stanley 




Jun. 


24 


Thomas Towne 


his Experience 
eodem die 






Lieft. Ephraim Dorman 


his Jacob 


July 


29 


Samuell Stanley- 


11 Samuell 


Aug. 


6 




" Thomas 


u 


a 


Samuel Stanley 


" Jacob & 


(( 


it 




" Abagail 


<( 


" 


Zacheus Curtis 


" Zechariah 


Sept. 


9 


Goodwife Nichols 


her Margaret 


" 


16 




" Elits 


<« 


tt 




Lydia 


<< 


(i 


Joseph Andrew 


his John 


(i 


tt 


Thomas Reddington 


" Rebeka 


u 


23 


Thomas Andrews 


" Lilburn 


Oct. 


7 


Thomas Perkins 


" Thomas 


Dec. 


9 


John Stiles 


" John 


" 


16 


My own (Capen) 


Mary 


Feb. 


17 1688 


Daniell Redington 


" Mary 


Mar. 


17 89 


Goodwif Dunnell 


her Tryphena 


Apr. 


7 


John Towne 


his Ephraim 


c( 


22 


Joanna Stanley ye 


wife of Samuell 


(< 


28 


Mr. Tobijah Perkins 


his Priscella 


<( 


<« 


Samuell Howlet 


" Meriam 


May 


5 


Joseph Estie 


" Joseph 


<« 


(< 


Caleb Jackson 


" Samuell 


<< 


cc 


Mr. Bradstreets 


Mercy 


June 


2 


William Pebodys 


Ephraim 


<( 


cc 


Benjamen Bixbys 


Samuell 


(< 


" 


Joseph Pebodys 


Jonathan 


<( 


16 


Mr. Timothy Perkins 


his Nathaniell 


Sept. 


22 


Timothy Dorman 


" Timothy 


11 


29 


Abraham How 


" Abijah 


Oct. 


6 


Jacob Foster 


" Benjamin 


(< 


«« 


Daniell Wood 


" Mercy 


" 


27 


John Gould jun. 


" Mary 


Nov. 


3 


Jacob Pebody 


" Jacob 


Dec. 


15 


William Smith 


" Rebecka 


(< 


22 


John Cummins 


" Joseph 


Jan. 


26 


Zacheus Curtis 


" Prudence 


Feb. 


16 


John Curtis 


«■« Pheobe 


Mar. 


2 1690 



CHURCH IN TOPSFIELD. 



185 



Thomas Andrews 


his Patience 


Apr. 


6 


John Andrews 


" Sarah 


« 


tt 


Capt. How 


" Hannah 


tt 


27 


Samuell Stanley 


" Matthew 


C( 


tt 


Thomas Hazen 


" Thomas 


May 


4 


Isaac Cummins Jun. 


" Lydia 


«( 


<« 


Joseph Bixby 


" Phebe 


Jun. 


8 


Timothy Perkins 


" Timothy 


July 


6 




Hannah 


tt 


a 


Ephraim Wilds 


" John 


Aug. 


10 


Elisha Perkins 


" Phebe 


Sept 


14 


Mr. Baker 


" John 


Jan. 


11 


Daniell Clarke 


" Samuell 


<( 


18 


Mr. Tobijah Perkins 


" Mary 


a 


25 


Daniell Reddington 


" Sarah 


Feb. 


8 


Isaac Estie 


" Mary 


tt 


15 


William Pebody 


" Richard 


Apr. 


5 1691 


Mr. Zerubbabell Endicot 


" Grace 


<( 


12 


John Town 


" Jonathan 


a 


19 


My own (Capen) 


Elizabeth 






William Smith 


" Martha 


a 


26 


Nehemiah Abbot 


" Dorothie 


it 


«< 


Goodman Esties grandchild Sarah Gill 


May 




Joseph Estie 


Samuel 


(< 




Jacob Foster 


Mary 


tt 


17 


Goodman Knight 


his Phillip 


(C 


24 




Margaret 


it 


(C 


& at ye same time 


Rebecka 


(( 


it 


Mary Hobbes was 


Margere 


tt 


te 


baptized on her own 


Elizabeth 


il 


tt 


account entring into 


Abigail 


a 


it 


Covenant. 


Mary 


tt 


a 




Joseph 


tt 


it 




Mary Hobbes 


tt 


ti 


Thomas Reddington 


" Hannah 


Jun. 


21 


Joseph Andrews 


" Hephzibah 


July 


5 


Daniell Wood 


" Jacob 


Aug. 


30 


Goodwife Gill 


her Benjamin 


Sept. 


27 


Samuell Wallis 


his Samuel 


t< 


t< 


Ensign (Amos) Dorman 


" Joseph 


Oct. 


18 


Thomas Towne 


" Thomas 


«c 


tt 


Mr. Bradstreet 


" Dorothee 


It 


25 


John Gould 


" Nathaniell 


it 


<« 


HIST. COLL. XXIV 


12* 







186 



EARLY RECORDS OF THE 



Caleb Jackson 


his 


Mercy 


Nov. 


15 


Benjamin Bixby 


a 


George 


Feb. 


7 1691-2 


Josia Wood 


t< 


Margarett 


a 


14 


Daniell Reddington 


(< 


William 


Mar. 


13 


Joseph Estie 


tt 


Elisabeth 


a 


a 


Ephraim Wilds 


n 


Mary 


tt 


" 


John Andrews 


(< 


Rebecka 


" 


27 


Zacheus Curtis 


c< 


Joseph 


Apr. 


17 


Thomas Hazen 


it 


Jacob 


(c 


24 


200 Mr 


. Capen's number. 






Isaac Cummins 


his 


Isaac 


" 


a 


Timothy Dorman 


t< 


Elizabeth 


May 


15 


John Nichols 


" 


Edward 


Jun. 


26 


John Cummins 


<( 


John 


July 


17 


John Estie 


(< 


Mary 


a 


31 


Philip Knight 


(< 


Benjamin 


Aug. 


21 


Joseph Bixby 


<( 


John 


<( 


28 


John Curtis 


c« 


Ephraim 


(< 


<« 


Capt (John) How 


u 


Abigail 


Sept. 


4 1692. 


Mr Timothy Perkins 


(< 


John 


<< 


" 


Samuel! Stanley 


(( 


Joseph 


Oct. 


16 


Mrs. Hannah Buckman 


her Joses 


<( 


30 


Elisha Perkins 


his Jacob 


Nov. 


13 


Mr Tobijah Perkins 


a 


Tobijah 


Jan. 


8 1692-3 


Isaac Estie Jun 


a 


Abigaill 


tt 


" 


Timothy Perkins 


it 


Jonathan 


(( 


29 


Abraham How 


t< 


Israeli 


Mar. 


12 


Thomas Perkins 


tt 


Hannah 


«< 


tt 


Thomas Andrews 


(< 


Esther 


<( 


26 


Daniell Clarke 


it 


Elijah 


Apr. 


2 


Samuell Howlet 


n 


Samuell 


n 


9 


Lucy Wood wife of Nathaniel & 


Sarah Waters 


11 


30 


Zerubbabell Endicot 


his 


Zerubbabell 


May 


28 


Joseph Estie 


" 


Edward 


July 


16 


George Bixby 


" 


Nathaniell 


<( 


<( 


William Foster 


tt 


Sarah 


tt 


a 


My own (Capen) 




Joseph 


Aug. 


6 


William Pebody 


(< 


Hannah 


«( 


<t 


Daniell Reddington 


C( 


Phebe 


<( 


13 


John Hovey Jun 


" 


Dorcas 


<( 


20 


Ephraim Wilds 


n 


Ephraim 


Sept. 


3 


Lucy Wood 


her 


Nathaniell 


tt 


u 


Joseph Haile 


his Joseph 


i( 


17 



CHURCH IN TOPSFIELD. 



187 



Mr Baker 


his Elizabeth 


Sept. 24 


Jonathan Foster 


" Jonathan 


<< <( 


Phillip Knight 


" (Rebecka?) 


(( u 


Michael Dunnel 


" (Thomas?) 


Oct. 


John Towne 


" David 


" 29 


Nehemiah Abbot 


" Mary 


Nov. 5 


John Estie 


" Hannah 


Dec. 24 


Mr John Bradstreet 


" John 


Feb. 4 1693-4 


G]oodwife Willis 


her Sarah 


Apr. 29 1694 


Jjonathan Bixby 


his Lydia 


May 6 


G]oodwife Eames 


her Anna 


« (< 


T]homas Towne 


his Sarah 


" 13 


TJimothy Dorman 


" Mary 


11 27 


Thomas Eeddington 


** Thomas 


June 3 


Joseph Bixby 


" Mary 


(< <( 


Ephraim Curtis 


" Elizabeth 


" 24 


Daniell Clarke 


" Mary 


Aug. 19 


Tjhomas Hazen 


" TMary 
twins ^ 


Sept. 9 




(Lydia 


(< (< 


Bannah Putnam once Hanna 




"Borman" or " Dorman" 


her Hannah 


Sept. 16 


W]illiam Smith 


his William 


" 23 


Mr] Timothy Perkins 


" Richard 


" 30 


[s]aac Estie 


" Sarah 


Oct. 7 


Jo]hn Gould 


" Sarah 


" 14 


BJenjamin Bixby 


" Nathan 


Nov. 4 


Elizabeth Upham of Mauldin her Thomas 


" 18 


Isaac Pebody 


his Francis 


Dec. 2 


John Stiles 


4 ' Marcy 


<< a 


John Curtis 


" Hephzibah 


Jan. 6 


Thomas Andrews 


" Thomas 


Feb. 24 94-5 


Samuell Stanley 


" Sarah 


Mar. 10 95 


Tobijah Perkins 


" Joseph 


Apr. 7 


John Andrew 


" Anae 


«< <t 


William Averill 


" Elizabeth 


a a 


Abraham How 


" Mark 


May 5 


Elisha Perkins 


" Ruth 


June 9 


Timothy Perkins 


" Abigail 


<f << 


Thomas Perkins 


" Martha 


" 30 


Daniell Clarke 


" Daniell 


July 7 


J~|oseph Hail 


" Jacob 


Aug. 11 


S]amuel Perly Jun 


" Abigail 


«< t( 


Ephraim Smith 


u Mary 


Sept. 1 


Dan]iel Reddington 


" Jacob 


" 8 



188 



EAELY RECORDS OF THE 



John Estie 


his Susanna 


Sept 


.29 


Ephraim Wilds 


" Jonathan 


Oct. 


27 


Samuel Smith 


" Phebe 


a 


c( 


Jo]siah Wood 


" Mary 


Dec. 


8 


W]illiam Pebody 


" John 


a 


22 


Nehemia Abbot 


" Elizabeth 


a 


a 


Ja]cob Pebody 


" Mary 


Feb. 


9 95-6, 


John Curtic Jun 


" Priscella 


Mar. 


22 96 


J]ohn Towne 


" Samuell 


Apr. 


5 


J]ohn French 


" Elizabeth 


(< 


12 


Timo]thy Dorman 


" John 


May 


31 


Jo]nathan Bixby 


" Jonathan 


t( 


tt 


J]ohn Cummins 


" Isaac 


Jun. 


14 


P]hillip Knight Jun 


" Elizabeth 


July 


5 


Abjraham Eoster Jun 


" Abraham 


it 


12 


E]phraim Curtis 


" Ephraim 


a 


2Q 


Zjacheus Curtis 


" Deborah 


Aug. 


9 


J]oseph Bixby 


" Thomas 


<« 


(< 


Elea]zer Putman 


" Eleazer 


(C 


tt 


Dan]iell Foster 


' ' Katharine 


c< 


23 


Caleb Jackson 


" Joshua 


<( 


30 


Thomas Nichols 


" Anna 


(< 


a 


Joseph Estie 


" Lydia 


Sept. 


20 


Thomas Robinson 


" Hannah 

300 


Oct. 


4 


Mr Timothy Perkins 


" Jacob 


(< 


18 


John How 


" Martha 


Nov. 


1 




" Sarah 


<( 


tt 




" James 


(< 


a 


Goodwife Wood 


her Obadia 


(< 


tt 


John Hovey Jun 


his Mary 


a 


15 


Isaac Estie Jun 


" Isaac 


a 


22 


Ensign Dorman 


" Lydia 


(< 


29 


Mr (John) Bradstreet 


" Margarett 


Dec. 


6 


Thomas Towne 


" Edna 


Jan. 


3 96 


Thomas Perkins 


" Rob art 


Mar. 


7 97 


John Estie 


" Jemima 


" 


<( 


Isaac Pebody 


" Isaac 


<( 


21 


William Averill 


" Joseph 


tt 


(< 


Daniell Clark 


" Jacob 


it 


28 


Joseph Pebody Jun 


" Joseph 


Apr. 


4 


Ephraim Smith 


" C Elizabeth 


" 


11 



twins 



Hannah 



CHURCH IN TOPSFIELD. 



189 



Isaac Cummins Jun 


his Allice 


May 


9 


Johnn Averell 






<( 


16 


Nathaniell " 






<« 


(< 


Job 






(< 


ct 


Ebenezer " 






<< 


tt 


Thomas " 






<« 


tt 


Paul •• 






(< 


a 


Isaac " 






C( 


(< 


Hannah " 






a 


<< 


Abigaill " 






(« 


tt 


Mary " 






<( 


tt 


Thomas Hazen 


his Hephzebah 


ct 


tt 


Robart Willit 


" 


Robert 


(1 


23 


John Curtis 


(i 


John 


it 


(< 


Sarah Smith 


her Sarah 


<« 


<< 


John Andrews 


his John 


«( 


30 


Samuell Porter 


<( 


Ellenor 


tt 


(C 


Thomas Reddington 


(< 


Margarett 


Jun. 


13 


Thomas Perley ' 
Nathaniell " 


entred into 






11 


2(0) 


Covenant 






<( 


tt 


Isaac " 


► 2 on thar fathers 


« 


" 


Jeremiah " 


acount at 


y e 




tt 


tt 


Mary " 


same time 










Sarah " & 










Allice 










Mr. Tobijah Perkins 


his Daniell 






& Thomas Perley 


it 


John at ye 


Same time 


Samuell Stanley 


tt 


Nathaniell 


July 


4 


Michaell Dunnel Jun 


a 


Sarah 


a 


ct 


Abraham Smith 


tt 


Nathan 


<« 


11 


(my own (Capen) erased 


" 


Nathannell 


(« 


14 


John Gould 


(C 


Hannah 


<< 


18 


Joseph Andrews 


tt 


Lydia 


Sept 


5 


Thomas Perley 


<( 


Mary 


« 


(C 


Capt How 


<< 


Joseph 


Oct. 


3 


Joseph Hale 


«c 


Mary 


(C 


<< 


Joseph Estie 


it 


John 


tt 


10 


Daniell Reddington 


(« 


Phineas 


<( 


24 


Ephraim Wilds 


tt 


Susanna 


(< 


" 1697 


No more baptisms till 










Ephraim Wilds 


his 


Dorothee 


Dec. 


22 1700 


John Howlett 


t< 


John 


<( 


" 


RJobart Stiles 


a 


Jemima 


Mar. 


9 1701 


J]acob Poster 




a 


Isaac 


ct 


16 



190 



EARLY RECORDS OF THE 



J]ames Waters 


his Elizabeth 


Apr. 


6 


Sjamuell Gould 


«( 


Samuell 


«( 


u 


Djaniell Reddington 


a 


Nathaniell 


May 


11 


Jo]hn How 


" 


Mark 


t( 


25 


Jo]hn Perkins 


(( 


William 


(< 


(< 


Jo]hn Curtis 


<< 


Lydia 


<t 


a 


E]phraim Curtis 


K 


Jacob 


Jun. 


1 


Is]aac Pebody 


<( 


William 


" 


29 


Ajbigail Bishop 


hei 


■ Abigail 


(< 


a 


Tjimothy Dorman 


his 


Sarah 


(< 


6 


Wjilliam Averell 


<< 


Stephen 


n 


" 


T]imothy Foster 


<( 


Jeremiah 


(C 


<« 


Lu]ke Hovey 


(C 


Darcas 


July 


20 


W]illiam Hobbes 


£< 


Susanna 


Aug. 


2 


his wife had ben baptiz d 


o her own account & then did ow 


covenant. 










Jo]hn Esty 


his Nathaniell 


Aug. 


24 


Tjhomas Gould 


(< 


Thomas 


Sept. 


14 


Jo]hn Kenney Jun 


<< 


Mary 


«< 


21 


D]aniell Clark 


(< 


Israel 


Oct. 


5 


T]imothy Perkins 


(< 


Hephziba 


t< 


12 


D]aniell Foster 


" 


Mehetabel 


" 


19 


L]ucy Wood 


her Margaret 


(< 


26 


Ejbenezer Sherwin 


his 


Susanna 


Nov. 


9 


Sjamuell Smith 


<( 


Samuell 


<< 


16 


]ho Perley 


(i 


Moses 


Dec. 


21 


J]ohn Cummins 


l< 


Susanna 


Jan. 


11 1701-2 


J]ohn Gould 


<< 


David 


Feb. 


22 


Jose]ph Hale 


it 


Moses 


Mar. 


1 1702 


Jo]hn Andrews 


a 


Susanna 


(c 


15 


Jjohn Perley 


(i 


John 


<< 


" 


Jojseph Towne 3d 


(i 


Joseph 


Apr. 


19 


Thom]as Perley 


(< 


Lois 


tc 


26 


S]amuell Porter 


«< 


Elizabeth 


(< 


<< 


Th]o Hazen 


(i 


Jeremiah 


May 


3 


B]enjamin Foster 


a 


Amos 


tc 


10 


M]ichaell Dunnel 


it 


Mary 


(< 


" 


P]eter Shumway 


" 


Oliver 


(< 


<« 


Eljisha Perkins 


ft 


Joseph 


<( 


17 


500 










I]saac Esty 


<« 


Hanna 


(< 


24 


B]enjamin Smith 


a 


John 


Jun. 


21 


J]onathan Bixby 


<( 


Mary 


(< 


28 


J]ohn French 


u 


Kezia 


July 


12 



CHURCH IN TOPSFIELD. 



191 



Jo]hn Bussel 


his 


Lydia 


July 


19 


daughter of J Curtis 










Sajrah Smith 


her Mary 


Aug. 


2 


Th]omas Dunnell 


his Jonathan 


" 


16 


I]saac Burton Sen wt his whole family 






Sous. 




John 

Isaac 

Jacob 

Henry 

Hannah 

Lydia 

Elizabeth 




23 

<< 
(< 

<< 
(c 
tt 


& ye wife of Joseph Esty, 




Jane Esty 




a 


& ther 




Benjamin 




tt 


Nathaneel Avery 


his 


Jacob 




a 


wife of "William Towne, 




Margaret 




a 


&] her children, 




Hannah 




<( 


Hannah & John children 




John 




tt 


by her I s * Husband, 




Mary 




a 


John Willard. 




William 
Isaac 




<< 


in all Baptisd 17 






Ephraim Wilds 


his 


Jacob 


Sept 


. 7 


Richard Kymballs 




Hannah 


(< 


" 


Jacob Foster 


«< 


John 


a 


13 


Ephraim Smith 


u 


Priscella 


<( 


20 


Isaac Pebody 


tt 


Esties 


Oct. 


4 


John Perkins 


&< 


John 






Samuell Towne 


<< 


Samuell 






William Hobbs 


<< 


Dina 






Daniell Reddington 


a 


Dorcas 


N 


22 


Nathaniell Porter 


<< 


Mehitabe 


11 




John Howlett 


« 


Mary 


Dec. 


27 


John Pritchett 


a 


Elizabeth 


(« 


tt 


Tho Gould 


<( 


Jacob 


Jan. 


31 1702-3 


John Dunnel 


(< 


Kezia 


Mar. 


7 


Benjamin Bixby 


<( 


Jemima 


it 


14 


William Chapman & 






a 


21 


Elizabeth Chapman (Adults^ 


) 




*« 


tt 


Zacheus Gould 


tt 


Elizabeth 




" 


Samuel Smith 


it 


Susanna 


<( 


(< 


Peter Shumway 


tt 


Jeremiah 


tt 


tt 


William Averell 


«< 


James 


Apr. 


11 



192 



EARLY RECORDS OF THE 



Anne Perkins 






Apr. 11 


William Towne 


his 


Ichabod 


" 18 


John Curtis 


<( 


Mary 


cc cc 


Ebenezer Averell 


<( 


Mehetabel 


May 2 


Caleb Foster 


<( 


Lydia 


" 16 


Joseph Towne 


<« 


Joseph 


" 30 




(< 


Benjamin 


cc cc 




«< 


Nathan 


cc cc 




« 


Daniell 


cc cc 




<( 


Jesse 


cc cc 




<t 


Nathaneell 


cc cc 


Ephraim Curtis 


(< 


Isaac 


a cc 


John How 


tt 


Mary 


cc cc 


Benjamin Esty 


CC 


Benjamin 


Jun. 6 


John Kenney Jun 


(( 


Elisha 


" 27 


John Hovey Jun 


(( 


Joseph 


July 11 


Tho Towne 


cc 


Mercy 


" 18 1703 


Timothy Perley 


(( 


Joseph 


" 25 


Daniell Foster 


It 


Phineas 


(l cc 


Timothy Perkins 


cc 


Esther 


Aug. 22 


Joseph Borman 


<t 


Hannah 


cc cc 


Elizabeth Chapman 






Sept. 19 


ye wife of W. Chapman 








Joseph Towne 3 d 


11 


Archilaus 


Oct. 3 


Amos Dorman 


(( 


Dorothee 


" 24 


Samuell Porter 


(( 


Eliezer 


" 31 


Mr Timothy Perkins 


(( 


Hannah 


Nov. 21 


Thus far 


in old meeting hous 572 


Samuell Stanley 


his 


John 


Dec. 11 


Daniel Clarke 


(< 


Humphry 


" 19 


Ebenezer Shurwin 


<( 


Jonatha 


Jan. 9 1703-4. 


Thomas Dorman 


cc 


Deborah 


Feb. 13 


Nathaniell Porter 


cc 


Nathaniell 


" 27 


Tho Robinson 


cc 


Daniel 


Mar. 12 


Joseph Towne 


tt 


Amy 


" 26 


Daniell Reddington 


<( 


Martha 


May 7 


Benjamin Foster 


(( 


Deborah 


<< t< 


Tho Perley 


tt 


Asa 


" 21 


Benjamin Bixby Jun 


cc 


Benjamin 


a cc 


Tho Dunnell 


a 


Mary 


" 28 


Ephraim Smith 


cc 


Hephzeba 


June 11 


Isaac Pebody 


it 


Joseph 


" 18 


Ephraim Wild 


tt 


Priscella 


cc cc 



CHURCH IN TOPSFIELD. 



193 



John Perkins 




his 


Elizabeth 


June 18 


Nathaniell Averill 




t< 


Abigail 


July 16 


Ebenezer Averill 




H 


Susanna 


" 22 


John Andrews 




(( 


Joshua 


" 30 


Corpral Curtis his daughter 








Smiths 






Hanna 


Aug. 6 


John Pritchet 




his 


Mary 


" 13 


Isaac Cummins 




tt 


Jemima 


" 20 


John Perley 




" 


Martha 


« 27 


N : W wife 








Goodwife Wood 




her 


Abigail 


Nov. 5 


John French 




his 


John 


" 26 


Thomas Gould 




a 


Deborah 


Dec. 3 


Caleb Foster 


600 


c« 


Jonathan 


<( tt 


Jacob Foster 




it 


Ezekiel 


" 31 


Zacheus Gould 




a 


Mary 


Apr. 8, 1705. 


Abraham Foster 




a 


Daniell 


" 15 


Samuell Smith 




a 


Solomon 


tt tt 


Daniell Foster 




tt 


Hannah 


May 6 


Margaret Towne ye wife of Joseph Towne 3 d 




& her 






Israeli 


May 13 


David Shepley 








« 27 


& a child of Tho Andrew his daug 


titer SwettLyd 


ia" " 


John Howlett 




his William 


Jun. 17 


Deborah Perley wife 


of Timothy 


P 


« 24 


William Towne 




his Jeremiah 


" 24 


Benjamin Bixby 




(< 


Martha 


July 1 


William Averil 




u 


Rebecka 


" 15 


David Shepley 




a 


David 


Aug. 26 


Mr Joseph Andrews 




it 


Nathaniel 


Sept. 23 


John Curtis 




tt 


Sarah 


" 30 


Samuel Porter 




tt 


Hephzebah 


Oct. 7 


Peter Shumway 




it 


David 


Dec. 23 


John Dunnell 




a 


Tryphena 


" 30 


Daniell Clarke 




tt 


Sarah 


Jan. 6 1705 


Michael Dunnel 




tt 


Michael 


" 13 


Nathaniell Porter 




(« 


Mercy 


" 20 


Daniell Waters 








. " 27 


Eliezer Foster 






his Elizabeth Feb. 17 


Ephraim Wild 




u 


Priscella 


Mar. 10 


Isaac Pebody 




(< 


Sarah 


" 24 


Daniel Waters 




tt 


Mary 


" 31 1706 


John Stanley 








Apr. 7 


HIST. COLL. 


XXIV 


13 





194 



EARLY RECORDS OF THE 



Isaac Esty 


his Richard 


Apr. 7 


John How 


<( 


Sarah 


<( (< 


Amos Dorman 


<( 


Judeth 


May 5 


John Chapman 






" 26 


Anne Chapman 






<( a. 


Benjamin Estie 


<i 


Ebenezer 


»C (( 


Ebenezer Averill 


(< 


Ruth 


Jun. 16 


Thos Caves 






" 23 


Hannah Dunnel & 






a it 


Ann Caves 






a a 


Tho Dorman 


his Eleanoer 


Jun (30) 


Samuel Towne 


(< 


Phillip 


«( (C 


Samuell Smith Son-in-law of 








John Curtis 


« 


Samuell 


(July) 


Tho Cummins 


« 


Samuell 


Aug. 4 


John Cummins 


t( 


Stebbins 


" 18 


Tho Robinson 


(< 


Stephen 


Sept. 1 


John Perkins 


<< 


Mary 


« [8 


Caleb Foster 


a 


Sarah 


" [" 


John Burton 


<< 


Isaac 


« 15 


John French 


a 


Mary 


Oct. 27 


Ephraim Smith 


t< 


John 


Nov. 


John Pritchet 


u 


John 


Dec. 


Samuel Potter 


it 


Esther 


Jan. [1706-7. 


Ebenezer Foster 


(( 


Jemima 


Feb. 


Nathaniell Averil 


(( 


Sarah 


«< 


John Perley 


(( 


Jane 


Mar. 2 


Jacob Foster 


(( 


Israeli 




David Shapley 


(< 


Richard 


Apr. 6 


Daniell Waters 


" 


Hannah 


" 20 


John Esty 


a 


C David 
\ Jonathan 


May 4 












Kezia 


" 4, 1707 


Benjamin Foster 


his Kezia \ 


a 


Thomas Dunnell 


<( 


Ruth > 


a 


Samuel Stanley 


(< 


Hannah > 
Mary 5 


a 


Benjamin Bixby 


< < 


a 


Isaac Pebody 


(< 


Anne 


Jun. 8 


John Gould 


(< 


Lydia 


«< a 


William Averell 


< t 


Jabez 


" 15 


Isaac Cummins 


<( 


Pelatiah 


«c <« 


Daniell Foster 


a 


Jeremiah 


u t( 


John Andrews 


a 


James > 
Mercy > 


July 


Joseph Robinson 


" 


u 



CHURCH IN TOPSFIELD. 



195 



Ephraim Curtis 


his Ebenezer 




Job Averel 


a 


Job 


Aug. 


Daniell Clark 


(< 


Dan 


Sept. 


William Towne 


«< 


Debora 


a 


Lucy Wood 


her 


• Hephzeba 


(C 


Zacheus Gould 


his Priscella 


({ 


Joseph Shumwa 






Dec. 7 


Doreas Shumwa 






CC (( 


Samuell Smith 


" 


Joseph 


Jan. 4 


Eliazer Foster 


" 


Habijah 




Ebenezer Averill 


<( 


Hannah 


Feb. 


Ephraim Wilds 


<< 


Samuell 




Michaell Bunnell 


(i 


Stephen 


Mar. 14 1707-8 


William Porter 


«( 


Ruth 


Ap 


John Dunnell 


«< 


Susanna 


A 


Thomas Perley 


<< 


Abigail 




Paul Averill 


it 


Ezekiel 


M 9 


Peter Shumway 


a 


Mary 




Thomas Dorman 


c« 


Thomas 




Caleb Foster 


«( 


Caleb 


Jun. 


Thomas Perley Short Tho 


a 


M 


1708 


John Perkins 


(( 


Jemima 


July 


Mary Wood Daughter of N Woods 


18 1708 


Thomas Curtis 


his Thomas 


July 


Joseph Bixby 


«i 


Lydia 


(< 


Luke Hovey 


(< 


Luke 


Aug. 8 


Isaac Esty 


<( 


Rebecka 


" 


Joseph Towne 


<< 


Elisha 


Oct. 


Ephraim Smith 




Sarah 


N 


Daniell Waters 


his David 




Samuell Smith 


a 


Elizabet 




S]amuell Stanley Jun 


a 


Samuell 


Jan. 9 1708-9 


J]ohn How 


(< 


John 


Mar. 6 1708-9 


Samuell Smith 


<t 


Phebe 


" 13 1708-9 


J]ohn Burton 


(( 


Benjamin 


Apr. 10 1709 


Nathaniell Porter 


a 


Abigail 


" 17 


Samuell Porter 


a 


Samuel 


« 24 


TJhomas Dunnell 


" 


David 


May 15 


Nathjaniell Foster 


c< 


Hannah 


Jun. 5 


i W]illiam Hobbs 


(I 


William 

Daniell 

Joseph 




IJsaac Pebody 


(< 


Hephzebah 


July 10 1709 


Nathaniell Averell 


(< 


Meriam 


" 17 


Benjamin Bixby Jun 


(< 


John 


«( cc 



196 



EARLY RECORDS OF THE 



J]acob Foster 
J]ohn French 
J]oseph Towne 
S]amuell Gould 

& 
J]ohn Bunnell 
Ejphraim Wilds 
Benjamin Foster 
Paul Averell 
Benjamin Foster 
John Gould 
Timothy Perkins 
Phillip Squire 
Ebenezer Foster 
Jacob Robinson 
William Averil 
Michaell Dunnel 
Thomas Curtis 
John Towne 
Daniell Waters 
John Pritchett 
Caleb Foster 
William Towne 
Jesse Dorman 
Samuell Potter 
Ivory Hovey 
Job Averell 
Joseph Towne 
John Perkins 
Nathaniell Wood 
Ebenezer Averell 
William Porter 
John Hovey 
My son John (Capen) 
Daniell Foster 
John French 
John Perley 
Jacob Esty 
John Gould 
Samuell Shumway 
Nathaniell Porter 
Jacob Robinson 
Samuell Smith 

Nathaniell Borman 



twins 



his Martha 


July 24 


(< 


Joseph 


Aug. 14 


<< 


Amos 


Sept. 4 


it 


Jonathan 


a n 


a 


Patience 


a tt 


a 


Tryphosa 


" 25 


tt 


Hannah 


Oct. 9 


» 


Gideon 


" 16 


(< 


Hephzeba 


Nov. 13 


it 


Benjamin 


" 27 


tt 


Martha 


Dec. 4 


it 


Elizabeth 


Jan. 15 

" 22 


(« 


Ruth 


Feb. 5 


u 


Jacob 


« 12 


(( 


Moses 


" 26 


LI 


Hannah 


Mar. 19 


a 


John 


" 26 1710 




John 
Jemima 


Apr. 9 


it 


William 


" 16 


tt 


Stephen 


" 30 


u 


Mercy 


May 14 


" 


Philemon 


" 21 


1 1 


Lydia 


June 4 


iC 


Anne 


" 10 


" 


Judith 


" 18 


(( 


Bartholomew 


tt <( 


«t 


Kezia 


(< a 


(( 


Zeruah 


tt a 


(( 


Mary 


Aug. 20 


(( 


Judith 


(< << 


tt 


Susanna 


Sept. 24 


«( 


Joseph 


Dec. 24 


(( 


Asa 


Jan. 21 1710-11 


" 


Samuel 


Feb. 4 


(( 


Jonathan 


<( <( 


(( 


Jacob 


(C it 


(I 


Mary 


It it 

Mar. 11 


" 


Thomas 


Apr. 1 


" 


Amos 


" 8 1711 


(( 


John 


" 15 


(I 


Mercy 


<( tt 


It 


Nathaniell 


it a 



CHUKCH IN TOPSFIELD. 



197 



Peter Shurawa 


his Samuell 


Apr. 


22 


John Averill 


" 


John 


(< 


29 


John Dunnell 


n 


John 


(< 


cc 


Jacob Foster 


a 


David 


Jun. 


3 


Samuell Stanley 


" 


Jonathan 


<( 


a 


Samuell Smith 


< ( 


Margaret 


<< 


a 


Ephraim Wilds 


<( 


Amos 


July 


1 


Ephraim Dorman 


(( 


Ephraim 


u 


(< 


Samuell Smith 


" 


Mary 


Aug. 


19 


Thomas Himkins 


cc 


Lydia 


Sept. 


2 


Nathaniell Averill 


" 


Daniell 


(< 


16 


Ebenezer Nichols 


1 c 


Joseph 


Oct. 


14 


Benjamin Bixby 


cc 


Kezia 


Nov. 


4 


Caleb Foster 


cc 


Mary 


Dec. 


30 


Ivory Hovey 


" 


Dorcas 


" 


<« 


Thomas Gould 


c c 


Mercy 


Jan. 


27 


Samuell Porter 


cc 


Jerusha 


Feb. 


3 


Amos Dorman 


cc 


Amos 


Mar. 


9 


Thomas Curtis 


cc 


Phebe 


(( 


23 


Joseph Towne 


" 


Mary 


(< 


30 1712 


John Towne 


(( 


Elizabeth 


tt 


cc cc 


William Porter 


cc 


Benjamin 


Apr. 


6 


Benjamin How 


it 


Benjamin 


(< 


20 


John Perkins 


tt 


Susanna 


u 


27 


Jesse Dorman 


" 


Euth 


it 


cc 


Zacheus Gould 


tt 


Sarah 


May 


4 


William Hobbs 


tt 


Humphrey 


" 


cc 


John Burton 


cc 


John 


(< 


cc 


Daniell Waters 


tt 


Mary 


<( 


cc 


Joseph Knight 


cc 


Abigail 


ti 


cc 


John Gould 


cc 


Anna 


a 


11 


Paul Averill 


(( 


Paul 


Jun. 


1 


Thomas Buzzell 


ti 


Thomas 


July 


6 


Jacob Stanley 


cc 


Miriam 


tt 


13 


John Curtis 


twins 


C Sarah 
^ Hannah 


Aug. 


24 


Simon Bradstreet 


his 


Elizabeth 


cc 


31 


Isaac Esty 


« 


Moses 


Sept. 


6 


y e widdo Benjamin Smith owned 








ye covenant & had 


4 children 


Benjamin 


< t 


28 






Stephen 


" 


cc 






Rebaka 


11 


cc 






Sarah 


ti 


a 



198 



EARLY RECORDS OF THE 



Ephraim Dorman 


his 
800 


i Mary 


Nov. 23 


Ebenezer Averell 


it 


Lydia 


Dec. 14 


Samuell Stanley 


u 


Abigail 


<( a 


Jacob Pebody 


(( 


Jacob 


Mar. 1 1713 


John Perley 


(C 


Samuell 


" 15 


Jacob Robinson 


" 


John 


Apr. 19 


John Towne 


(( 


Bartholomew May 17 


Dorcas Butler 


her 


• Mary 


" 31 


Caleb Foster 


his 


; Philemon 


Jun. 6 


Job Averill 


tt 


Israeli 


" 21 


Paul Averill 


a 


Sarah 


July 5 


Jacob Esty 


" 


Lydia 


Aug. 2 


Joseph Cummins 


tt 


Joseph 


(< (« 


Ephraim Wilds 


" 


Nathan 


9 


Peter S hum way 


it 


John 


" 16 


Samuell Smith 


(< 


Abigail 


" 30 


John Nichols 


(< 


John 


Sept. 6 


Samuell Potter 


(< 


Abigail 


<( (< 


Nathaniell Porter 


(« 


Elijah 


Oct. 18 


John Cummins 


(< 


Rebecka 


Nov. 1 


Joseph Knight 


a 


Hannah 


tt tt 


Hannah Clarke 






Dec. 6 


Samuell Smith 


a 


Samuell 


Jan. 3 1713-4 


Jacob Stanley 


n 


Joanna 


Feb. 14 


John Averill 


a 


Thomas 


Mar. 7 


Abraham How 


a 


Mercy 


(( (C 


Benjamin How 


tt 


Sarah 


<( (( 


Samuell Potter 


n 


Mary 


" 14 


Thomas Gould 


11 


Yeates 


Apr. 4 1714 


Joseph Towne 


it 


David 


n tt 


Joseph Gould 


tt 


Priscella 


a it 


William Towne 


" 


Kezia 


tt it 


William Porter 


tt 


Seth 


" 25 


Simon Bradstreet 


it 


Simon 


tt tt 


John Perkins 


(< 


Ruth 


May 9 


Amos Dorman 


t< 


Thomas 


Jun. 13 


John Gould 


it 


John 


" 20 


Ivory Hovey 


tt 


Ivory 


July 4 


Samuell Porter 


it 


David 


11 


Nathaniell Averill 


it 


Jeremiah 


25 


Thomas Curtis 


tt 


Hannah 


Aug. 1 


David Balch 


tt 


David 


" 15 


Timothy Perkins 


a 


Ruth 


11 29 



CHURCH IN TOPSFIELD. 



199 



Nathaniell Borman 


his Abigail 


Sept. 


5 


Samuell Stanley 


cc 


Mathew 


Oct. 


10 


John Howlett 


(( 


Thomas 


cc 


23 


John Perkins 


CC 


Elisha 


Jan. 


2 




846 in all thus far. 






Michaell Dunnell 


his 


. Jacob 


Feb. 


6, 1714-5 


Jacob Pebody 


(< 


Rebecka 


cc 


cc 


William Hobbs 


(< 


Benjamin 


May 


1, 1715 


Ebenezer Averill 


(< 


Jemima 


cc 


cc 


John How 


(< 


Zerriah 


cc 


15 


John Averil 


<< 


Emma 1 






Job Averil 


u 


Kezia 1 






John Nichols 


<( 


Samuell 


Aug. 


14 


Jacob Estie 


<< 


Isaac 


cc 


cc 


Timothy Perkins 


(< 


Jonathan 


cc 


28 


Samuell Potter 


« 


Mary 


Sept. 


4 


John Dunnell 


<< 


Sarah 


cc 


11 


Joseph Knight 


(< 


Phillip 


cc 


u 


Caleb Poster 


cc 


Sarah 


cc 


cc 


Francis Pebody 


c< 


Francis 


cc 


25 


Zacheus Gould 


<« 


Abigail 


tt 


cc 


Joseph Gould 


cc 


Joseph 


Oct. 


2 


Thomas Potter 


cc 


Jerusha 


cc 


cc 


Samuell Smith 


tt 


Rebecka 


cc 


9 


Samuell Smith 


tt 


Priscella 


cc 


cc 


Ebenezer Nichols 


a 


Rachell 


cc 


23 


Jacob Robinson 


tt 


Elizabeth 


Nov. 


6 


John Perley 


it 


Ruth 


« 


20 


Samuell Stanley 


cc 


Ruth 


Dec. 


4 


John Abbot 


it 


Remember 


(C 


John Capen 


tt 


Mary 


Feb. 


5, 1715-6 


Abraham How 


cc 


Jemima 


(C 


12 


Israeli How 


cc 


Israeli 


(C 


cc 


Ephraim Wilds 


cc 


Juliana 


cc 


19 


Stephen Perley ' 


cc 


Deborah 


cc 


cc 


Nathaniell Porter 


cc 


Joseph 






ye wife of Phillip Nealand 


upon 








her owning ye covenant. 


her Phillip 






Jacob Stanley 


his Rebecka 


Apr. 


15 1716 


John Jeffors 


cc 


Hannah 


" 


cc 


William Porter 


cc 


Anna 


cc 


22 


Son Baker (Thomas) 


cc 


Joseph 


May 


6 


Joseph Towne 


cc 


Abigail 


cc 


a 


Ivory Hovey 


" 


Abigail 


<c 


cc 



200 



EAKLY RECORDS OF THE 



Simon Bradstreet 




his Dudley 


Jun. 


3 


Tho Gould 




a 


Benjamin 


(C 


a 


John Wilds 




a 


John 


it 


10 


Isaac Cummins 




tt 


Jerusha 


(( 


17 


Phillip Nealan 




it 


Sarah 


(( 


" 


Dorcas Butler 




her Valentine 


tl 


24 


Joseph Cummins 




his Thomas 


July 


15 


John Perkins 




a 


Do re thee 


Nov 


4 


David Balch 




<( 


John 


«« 


<( 


Nathan Towne 




(< 


Phebe 


Feb. 


3 17K 






& " 


Katherine 


a 


a 


John Wilds 




«« 


Katherine 


a 




John Clarke 








n 


10 


Joseph Gould 




it 


Amos 


Mar. 


2 


John Averill 




<( 


Katherine 


Apr. 




Jacob Pebody 




a 


Abigail 


a 




Samuell Killum 




(< 


Samuell 


n 


21 


Joseph Cummins 




<< 


Jacob 


May 


19 


Tobijah Perkins 




(c 


Elizabeth 


it 


a 


John Cummins jun. 


(< 


John 


a 


26 


Samuell Potter 




«c 


Elizabeth 


Jun. 


30 


Joshua Towne 


all bapt 


iz<* on 


y e 






John Towne 


owning 


ofy e covenant 






Gideon Towne 


& all ye 


families 






Eliezer Lake 












Jacob Towne 












Abigail Ramsdel 












Phebe Gould 












Stephen Towne 












Jabez Towne 












Elisha Towne 












John Towne 




his Samuell 






Timothy Ramsdel 




<< 


Abigail 
John 






John Gould 




it 


Phebe 


July 


21 1717 


Joseph Knight 




a 


Josiah 


Aug. 




Eliezer Lake 




a 


Lydia 


a 








&" 


Priscella 


n 




John Perkins 




n 


Isaac 


Sept. 


22 


Timothy Perkins 




a 


Timothy 


<< 




Margaret Willard 


owned ; 


y e 








covenant was bi 


iptiz d also 








Benjamin How 




his son 


Benjamin 


Oct. 


6 


Ebenezer Nichols 




his Kezia 


(< 





CHURCH IN TOPSFIELD. 



201 



Samuel Stanley- 


his David 


Nov. 


3 


James Jetton 


" 


Hanna 


" 


tt 


John Abbot 


It 


John 


a 


a 


Caleb Foster 


a 


John 


tt 


10 


Ebenezer Averill 


tt 


Phebe 


it 


24 


Thomas Perkins 


tt 


Robert 


it 


<« 


Thomas Potter 


tt 


Thomas 


Dec. 




Son John Capen 


a 


Mary 


" 


15 


Ephraim Wilds 


tt 


Elijah 


Jan. 




Zacheus Gould 


tt 


Zacheus 


Feb. 




Thomas Goodhall 


tt 


Thomas 


<( 




Abraham How 


" 


Hephzeba 


Mar. 




Son (Simon) Bradstreet 


a 


John 


<< 


16 


Nathaniell Porter 


it 


Eleanour 


Apr. 




Son (Thomas) Baker 


tt 


Priscella 


May 


4 


Stephen Perley 


it 


Allen 


" 


11 


Widdow Hobbs 


n 


Mary 


" 


t< 


Francis Pebody 


it 


Mary 


a 


18 


Samuell Smith 


ti 


Rebecka 


tt 




Nathan Towne 


1 1 


Joseph 


tt 




John Gould 


" 


Kezia 


Jun. 


22 


Joseph Towne 


<« 


Phebe 


July 


6 


Samuell Smith 


" 


Elizabeth 


tt 


20 


John Burton 


tt 


Samuell 






John Perkins 


a 


Rebecka 






Ivory Hovey 


ti 


Aaron 


Sept 




John Averill 


tt 


Ebenezer 


Oct. 




Timothy Ramsdell 


it 


Katharine 


N 




Thomas Gould 


n 


Nathaniell 


it 




Thomas Dunnel 


n 


Abigail 






John Wilds 


tt 


Zebulon 


CDec. 
( idem 


21 1718 


John Cummins 


(< 


Hannah 




Jacob Peabody 


cc 


Nathaniell 


Mar. 


1 1719 


Joseph Gould 


it 


Ruth 


Apr. 


5 


John Abbot 


n 


Mercy 


tt 


19 


Jacob Estys 


«( 


Anna 


May 


3 


Abraham Foster 


tt 


Abraham 


n 


10 


Tobijah Perkins 


1 1 


Joseph 


a 


u 


965 so far 










Amos Dorman 


tt 


Mary 


Jun. 


7 


Thomas Curtis 


tt 


Israeli 


" 


14 


Samuell Potter 


it 


Samuell 


« 


28 


Philip Nealand 


a 


Samuell 


tc 


" 


HIST. COLL. XXIV 




13* 







202 



EARLY RECORDS OF THE 



John Towne 


his Jonathan 


July 19 


Benjamin How 


c< 


James 


26 


Isaac Cummins jun 


it 


Abigail 


Aug. 2 




& " 


Elisha 


<« «( 


Patience Bennit 






Sept. 13 


Eliezer Lake 


" 


Abigail 


" 20 


Samuell Stanley- 


(< 


Jacob 


Oct. 4 


Michael Dunnell 


it 


Abigail 


" 11 


Charity Dunnell 






Dec. 13 


Thomas Baker 


c< 


John 


" 20 


John How 


(( 


Joseph 


" 27 


Stephen Perley 


«' 


Sarah 


Ja. 


Abraham How 


(< 


Sarah 


Feb. 


John Perkins 


(C 


John 


" 28 1719-20 


Joseph Towne 


<( 


Hannah 


Mar. 27 1720 


Thomas Potter 


1 t 


Martha 


(< ce 


Francis Pebody 


a 


Dorothee 


Apr. 


Thomas Perkins 


" 


Thomas 


" 24 


Simon Bradstreet 


(< 


Margarett 




Widdow Ann Averil 


her Abiel 




Thomas Dunnell 


his 


Esther 


May 8 


John Gould 


i t 


John 


July 3 


Ebenezer Nichols 


(< 


Aquilla 


" 10 


Zacheus Gould 


<( 


Eliezer 


" 17 


John Chapman 


t< 


Rebecka 


a a 


William Porter 


« 


Jonathan 


" 24 


David Balch 


" 


Joshua 


" 


Joseph Robinson 


" 


Martha 


a a 


Timothy Ramsdell 


" 


Timothy 


Aug. 7 


Job Averil 


" 


Samuel 


" 14 


Joseph Cummings 


t< 


Sarah 


" 21 


Elizabeth lies 


her Elizabeth 


" 28 


John Abbot 


his Jacob 


a a 


Ivory Hovey 


(< 


Ann 


Sept. 25 


John Wilds 


" 


Elisha 


a a 


Isaac Cummins jun 


, 


Mary 


Oct. 2 


Nathaniell Porter 


'< 


Mary 


" 9 


Sarah Merrifleld 






«« 23 


Robert Knolton 


" 


Hannah 


Nov. 20 


Lieut Joseph Gould 


(i 


Mary 


Jan. 1 


Jacob Esty 


" 


Mary 


Feb. 12 1721 


Mr Conant 


1 1 


William 


Mar. 12 


John Cummins jun. 


(< 


Mercy 


" 19 



CHURCH IN TOPSFIELD, 



203 



Jacob Towne jun. 


his Ruth 


Mar. 26 


Jacob Pebody 


" Priscella 


Apr. 2 


Robert Andrews 


" James 


" 23 


Abraham Foster jun 


" Sarah 


ma 


Thomas Perkins Secund 


" Judi 


m 


Benjamin Knight 


" Ruth 


(< 


Thomas Potter 


" Ezekiel 


May 21 


Phillip Nealand 


" Mary 


<« 


Jacob Towne 


" Joshua 


Sept. 


Ephraim Kymball 


" Ephraim 




Joseph Cummins 


" Abigail 


J 


John Towne 


" Abigail 


Feb. 


Tho Curtis 


" David 


Mar. 11 1722 


Samuel Boyd 


" Eliezer 


(« (< 


Francis Pebody 


" Samuell 


" 18 


John Abbot 


" Abigail 


C« (( 


Tho Baker 


" Elizabeth 


41 25 


John Curtis 


" John 


Apr. 1 


Tim Ramsdell 


" Joseph 


(« « 


William Isles 


" William 


<< << 


Abraham How 


" Ruth ^ 
" Joseph 5 




Isaac Cummins jun 




Samuell Smith 


" Hephzibah 


May 20 


John Wilds 


" Ezra 


« 27 


John Gould 


" Richard 


Jun 10 


Nathan Towne 


" Solomon 


cc 


Samuell Stanley 


" Elizabeth 




Daniell Towne 


" Daniell 




Job Averell 


" Susanna 


Sep. 


Samuell Curtis 


" Hannah 




Simon Bradstreet 


" Priscella 




Thomas Dunnel 


" Susanna -\ 
" Jacob > 
" Amos 3 


Sept. 30 1722 


Joseph Towne 


" Martha 




Lieut (Joseph) Gould 


" Anna 


Nov. 4 


Robert Andrews 


" Robert 


" 11 


Benjamin Knight 


" Margarett 


(< 


Nathan Bixby 


" Amos 


<t 


Timothy Perkins 


" William 




Daniell Redington 


" Daniell 




John Chapman 


' ' Mary 


Mar 


Jacob Perkins 


" Catharine 


Apr. 



204 



EAKLY RECORDS OF THE 



Zacheus Gould 


his Susanna 


Apr. 


, 20 


John Wilds 


(C 


Sarah 


May 


19 


Benjamin Towne 


« 


Benjamin 


<( 


a 


Thomas Stevens 


(( 


Mary 


<{ 


t( 


William Porter 


<< 


Jabez 


June 


9 1723 


Francis Pebody 


It 


Nathaniell 


tt 


'* 


Robert Perkins 


It 


Elizabeth 


Jun. 


23 1723 


Jacob Pebody 


tt 


Thomas 


Aug. 


25 


William Redington 


tt 


Elizabeth 


Sep. 




Tobijah Perkins 


it 


Tobijah 


Oct. 


6 


Thomas Potter 


<( 


Joanna 


tt 


20 


Mark How 


it 


Hannah 


Dec. 


1 


Jonathan Perkins 


a 


Jonathan 


Jan. 


5 1723 


Aaron Esty 


a 


Isaac 


<< 


26 


John Perkins 


a 


Thomas 


Mar. 


8 


Isaac How 






tt 


22 1724 


John Abbot 


tt 


Nehemia 


it 


2(9) 


Samuell Curtis 


a 


Rebecca 


Apr. 




Samuell Smith 


tt 


Robert 






Nathaniell Towne 


tt 


Jemima 


Jun. 


7 


Jacob Perkins 


it 


Hannah 


a 


u 


Samuell Potter 


tt 


Hannah ") 
Amos 1 
Abner ■' 
Gideon j 






Daniell Towne 


a 






Gideon Towne 


" 








& 






Thomas Perkins Ensign 


<< 


Thomas 


tt 


28 


John Burton 


c( 


David 


July 


5 


Jacob Towne 


a 


Jacob 


a 


a 


Samuell Towne 


u 


Mary 


it 


a 


Jacob Dorman 


it 


Mercy 


tt 


12 


Nathaniell Ramsdell 


tt 


Elizabeth 


tt 


<( 


Ephraim Kymball 


a 


Eunice 


it 


« 


William lies 


n 


John 


tt 


26 


Ebenezer Nichols 


" 


Elizabeth 


Aug. 


9 


Capt. Tho Baker 


(< 


Priscella 


a 


a 


Jacob Reddington 


<( 


Dorcas 


a 


it 


Abraham Foster 


it 


Thomas 


a 


16 


Jacob Peabody 


it 


Martha 


a 


23 


John Gould 


tt 


Stephen 


Sept. 


20 


Thomas Curtis 


a 


Benjamin 


Oct. 


25 


Eliezer Lake 


«« 


Eliezer 


" 


a 


Daniell Reddington 


<( 


Thomas 


(< 


a 


Samuell Bradstreet 


it 


Ann 


tt 


a 



CHURCH IN TOPSFIELD. 



205 



Thomas Potter 




his Anthony 


Nov. 


15 


Nathan Towne 




" Jonathan 


" 


22 


Simon Bradstreet 




" Lucy 


1 1 


29 


Noah Dodge 




" Abigail 


1 1 


" 


Capt Joseph Gould 




11 Sarah 


Dec. 


20 


Joseph Cummins 




" Daniell 


<« 


" 


Mark How 




" Love 


c« 


it 


Abraham How 




" Abraham 


Jan. 


3 


Samuell Howlett 




" Martha 






Aaron Esty 




" Aaron 


u 


31 


Dorcas Whittingham 


, 


her Anna 


Feb. 


7 


Francis Peabody 




his William 


May 


9 1725 


Paul Ave rill 




" Joseph 


cc 


23 


Jacob Dorman 




" Ruth 


(< 


30 


Isaac Cummins 




" Hannah 


<( 


" 


Samuell Perkins 




" Thomas 


Cc 


" 


Timothy Perkins twins 


" Timothy 


Jun. 


20 






" Kezia 






Rev. Joseph Capen 


died 30 June 1725 






Joseph Capen His 


Book E2 


: Dono Reverendissimi '. 


Magistri Josiah 


Flint 30 Aug. An Dom 1679 









SKETCH OF MRS. WILLIAM JARVIS 

OF 

WEATHERSFIELD, VERMONT. 



BY MRS. MARY PEPPERELL SPARHAWK JARVIS CUTTS. 



EDITED BT HER GRANDSON 

CECIL HAMPDEN CUTTS HOWARD. 



(Continued from p. 139.) 
PART II. 

In May, 1816, Mr. Jarvis came in his carriage for his 
bride, it being before the days of steam cars and stage 
coaches. Her sister, Eliza Bartlett (then Mrs. Sprague) 
beloved by all who knew her, died in March, and conse- 
quently, though the wedding was not delayed, it was a 
very quiet one. The service was performed in the morn- 
ing, then a collation ; and the bride and bridegroom, Miss 
Catherine Bartlett, a younger sister, bright, humorous 
and active, and Mr. Jarvis' two little girls, Mary and 
Elizabeth, began their journey to Vermont. 

Alas ! Vermont proved a stern step-mother to Mrs. 
Jarvis. She left a large cheerful family circle, parents, 
sisters, friends, a home filled with every comfort and con- 
venience, to preside over a large, neglected house, which 
her own industry and energy must transform to order 
and comfort. 

The house had been sadly mismanaged and showed 
plainly the want of woman's care and taste. It had fallen 
into that state between the departure of Mr. Jarvis' aunt, 
Mrs. Benjamin Jarvis, and his own illness and the coming 
of his wife ; his only assistance during the intervening 
period being the inefficient services of his fireman's wife. 

Mrs. Jarvis, in many respects, resembled her father 

C206) 



MKS. WILLIAM JAR VIS. 207 

more than any of the other children ; she possessed his 
executive ability, energy, industry and perseverance, and 
a remarkably well-balanced mind. 

With her sister's aid she began immediately the work of 
reform and improvement. She could only obtain green, 
untutored girls, daughters of the neighboring farmers, 
who required constant training and instruction, a continu- 
ous tax on her patience and fortitude. While the work 
of cleaning and putting in order was going on, friends of 
the consul's, from the neighboring towns, began to call 
upon her. 

The first of these was General Lewis E. Morris and 
lady. He was a son of the signer of the Declaration of 
Independence and a man of talents ; they owned a beau- 
tiful place four miles distant. The intimacy that grew 
up between these families only terminated with their 
lives. 

At this period provisions, etc., were brought in stout, 
two-horse wagons from Boston, a three days' journey. 
The teamsters had their " taverns" and regular stopping 
places. 

The farmers took their own produce down in the win- 
ter and brought back their own stores. Mr. Jarvis was 
a bountiful provider and whatever his wife required in 
the family he ordered from Boston, and these teams 
brought up the supplies. Mr. Jarvis was generous, lib- 
eral and hospitable, enjoyed society and had perfect con- 
fidence in his wife's ability to entertain his friends hand- 
somely. Several gentlemen in Windsor had a standing 
invitation to dine with him every Saturday for two or 
three years. 

Dr. Leonard Jarvis' family, the Consul's cousins in 
Claremont, for many years dined at Weatherstield every 
Saturday. The Consul's family also usually returned the 
visit weekly for some years. Doctor Jarvis was very skil- 



208 MRS. WILLIAM JARVIS 

ful, kind and attentive and became Mrs. Jarvis' favorite 
physician for her children. Doctor Torrey of Windsor, a 
talented man, was the family physician. At that time 
Mr. Samuel Gr. Jarvis, Dr. Leonard Jarvis' father, was 
living, a genial, warm-hearted, agreeable, old gentleman, 
and " William's wife" soon became a favorite. 

The Doctor's wife lived in warm friendship with Mrs. 
Jarvis for many years. They had now two children. In 
July some of the Consul's aunts and cousins from Boston 
and Maine came to spend a few weeks with himself and 
bride. The Consul and his aunts enjoyed this meeting 
exceedingly, as would also Mrs. Jarvis, but with half 
trained servants it was no trifling task day after day to 
have a handsome dinner prepared. With her methodical 
habits, Mrs. Jarvis never failed to be dressed and ready 
to take the head of the table, laid with punctilious exact- 
ness at one o'clock. She presided with suavity and dig- 
nity, and the Consul, remarkable for his conversational 
powers, sustained a lively conversation with the guests. 
As I look back, through the vista of years, it seems won- 
derful that she could so ably have overcome all opposing 
elements. The friends enjoyed their visits highly, and 
complimented Mrs. Jarvis on her success in presiding over 
the Consul's table and household. They dreamed not of 
the obstacles and discouragements with which she had to 
contend. 

While this family party was assembled the Consul re- 
ceived a copy of Guy Mannering, then recently published, 
and Mr. and Mrs. Jarvis and their aunts read it aloud in 
the evenings ; they became so fascinated that they some- 
times sat up till past midnight to pursue the interesting 
romance. As the autumn approached the guests departed, 
and there was more rest and comfort for the mistress of 
the household. Mrs. Jarvis found some cultivated pleas- 
ant ladies in Windsor, whose society she much enjoyed. 



OF WEATHERSFIELD, VERMONT. 209 

One from Newburyport, and one from Salem, with whom 
she had been formerly acquainted, were warm in their 
friendship. A few years later she formed many agreeable 
acquaintances in Charlestown, Bellows Falls, and Clare- 
mont. It was common to ride eight and ten miles to 
make a call in Vermont at that period. 

Dr. Jarvis' two sisters, who were born and educated in 
Boston, were lovely intelligent girls and were delighted 
to come to the Consul's and visit "Cousin Anna" and Miss 
Catherine Bartlett. They were a very agreeable addition 
to Mrs. Jarvis' society. At that time gentlemen and their 
families travelled in their own carriages, and they had 
many a pleasant call and visit from their former friends in 
I this way. 

In January, 1818, in a covered sleigh, abundantly sup- 
plied with buffalo robes and a pair of horses, Mr. Jarvis 
[drove his wife, her sister and the children to Haverhill, to 
j visit her beloved parents and sisters; a most interesting 
[reunion. After spending a week at the dear old paternal 
aabode, they went to Boston to visit mutual friends there. 

En passant it may be mentioned here that the Consul 
;for many years took his wife and family to Boston, to 
•some eligible private boarding-house for change and rec- 
reation ; then afterwards to her father's in Haverhill. 
As his children increased he had a sleigh of larger dimen- 
sions built ; for he made it a point to take all his children 
with him. It was then a three days' journey. On her 
return home Mrs. Jarvis' sister Sarah accompanied her, 
■a lovely young lady, remarkable for the elegance and 
suavity of her manners, a most agreeable and useful com- 
ipanion for her sister. 

In June, 1818, Mrs. Jarvis' first little girl was born, 
Ann Eliza. This was a joyful era in the family ; the Con- 
sul was very fond of children, and the little one was a 

HIST. COLL. XXIV 14 



210 MRS. WILLIAM JAR VIS 

great pet with him, as well as with the little girls. The 
Consul's mansion became proverbial for its hospitality each 
passing year. Freed from domestic cares, he began to 
write for the papers, and to members of Congress to ad- 
vocate the protection and encouragement of American 
manufactures ; for after the second war with England, 
manufactures and agriculture were at the lowest ebb. He 
was one of the very first who labored in this cause, and 
perhaps no man in America ever labored so perseveringly 
and continuously. During the first years of Mrs. Jarvis' 
residence in Vermont, poor people in the neighborhood 
sought employment of her ; some to spin and weave linen 
into towelling ; some took fine merino wool and spun and 
wove flannel ; others spun stocking yarn from the fine 
wool, carding it themselves, and knit long stockings that 
came over the knee for Mr. Jarvis, six pairs at a time. 
This was when domestic manufactures were in their in- 
fancy ; but through the Consul's and other statesmen's un- 
tiring labors, to encourage the manufactures of the United 
States, in a few years woolen factories began to be exten- 
sively established, and the home loom and spinning wheel 
were entirely superseded. Oh ! the changes that machinery 
has wrought since that day of small things ! The manu- 
facturing cities that have sprung up, — Lowell, Lawrence, 
Nashua, etc., etc. ! The thousands and thousands of spin- 
dles and looms running by steam ! The change seems 
too marvellous to have been compressed into one life- 
time ; yet Mr. and Mrs. Jarvis both witnessed the magic 
power that exerted such an influence over the country. 
The first year of Mrs. Jarvis' residence in Vermont was 
her most arduous one. She required an exact discharge 
of their duties from her domestics ; ruling with diligence, 
but at the same time she was just and equal and granted 
them many privileges when the duties were accomplished. 
She gained the reputation of being an excellent mistress, 



OF WEATHERSFIELD, VERMONT. 211 

and many of the more respectable farmers were glad to 
have their daughters under her wholesome instruction and 
discipline. Girls remained with her a long time, until 
they were married ; some seven and eight and fourteen 
years. Intelligent, respectable American girls. 

One very great addition to Mrs. Jarvis' cares and re- 
sponsibilities were the workmen who carried on the farm. 
In those days there were no labor-saving machines, no 
mowing machines, horse rakes, or cultivators, etc. Of 
course it required a great many hands to perform the labor 
on such an extensive farm. A large addition had been 
made to the house by Mr. Jarvis to accommodate them 
when he first came to this country. Mrs. Jarvis kept one 
woman especially to cook and wait upon them. During 
the haying and harvesting, when thirty workmen were often 
employed, two girls were required. Oh ! the pans of 
doughnuts, and the brick ovens full of pies that were made ! 
for, beside the three regular meals, there was a lunch sent 
into the field morning and afternoon. Mrs. Jarvis was 
obliged to have a general supervision to see that every- 
thing was provided for their comfort. It was at this busy 
season, too, that she usually had most guests from the 
cities. Under her wise administration, everything went 
on with regularity and order, yet not without much hard 
work, and for the mistress of the family continual care and 
responsibility. When she first came to Vermont, candles 
only were used in the house, and in the early winter fifty 
dozen or more of candles were made and packed away in 
boxes, a steady day's work for two girls. This provis- 
ion of candles lasted many years for the kitchen depart- 
ment ; but Mrs. Jarvis soon introduced sperm oil lamps 
for the family. In about twenty years after, mowing ma- 
chines began to be introduced which greatly lessened the 
number of workmen. 

The winter of 1820 was a dark and gloomy one. Mr. 



212 MRS. WILLIAM JARVIS 

Jarvis over-exerted himself and took a violent cold which 
settled in his eyes. For four long months he was shut 
up in a darkened room, with a screen between him and 
the open fire, and a shade over his eyes. Two able phy- 
sicians were in attendance who blistered freely, but the 
pain and inflammation continued. His wife was his careful 
and tender nurse. His two little girls and their cousin 
and teacher, Miss Humphreys, gave up school and devoted 
the whole day and evening till nine o'clock, p. m. to read- 
ing aloud in turn to him. He was able to come down to 
the darkened parlor every day, and reading was his only 
resource. In February Mrs. Jarvis became the mother 
of another little girl, whom she named Harriett Bartlet, 
for a beloved sister who had recently died. 

As the warm weather came on, Mr. Jarvis was able to 
ride out and attend to his accustomed duties, but never 
again could he read more than five minutes at a time or 
write anything but a common letter. All his letters, me- 
morials to Congress and articles for the papers were writ- 
ten through dictation by his wife and two elder daughters, 
and in two or three years the younger of these two daugh- 
ters, Elizabeth, became his favorite amanuensis as she 
caught his ideas with great facility and precision. 

Mrs. Jarvis' executive ability was displayed not only in 
the discipline and management of her domestics, but in 
cutting out her husband's under-clothing ; his fine shirts, 
and flannel under-garments made from his merino wool. 
There were no sewing machines in those days f no nice 
seamstresses in the neighborhood ; so that she was obliged 
to make his shirts, which she did, six at a time. Some- 
times her sisters assisted her ; but the amount of sewing 
she performed with her own hands for years was truly 
wonderful. System, perseverance and industry accom- 
plished wonders, a bright example to the young people of 
the present day. 



OF WEATHERSFIELD, VERMONT. 213 

Her household duties were dispatched early in the morn- 
ing, making a supervision of kitchen and pantries to see 
that all things were conducted right. Then before eleven 
she made her toilet for the day, and was ready to sit clown 
with her husband when he returned from his walk or drive 
about the farm. Her presence and society were always 
desired by him; she was ready to play a game of back- 
gammon or read aloud as he preferred ; but as they grew 
older one of his daughters read the papers, or periodicals, 
and she took her needlework and listened to the reading. 

She usually devoted most of the afternoon and some- 
times part of the evening to sewing, executing her work 
with great rapidity. She considered sewing an important 
duty. There was then no alternative. 

Her work table and basket were kept in the most per- 
fect order and were furnished with an abundance of the 
best materials for sewing that could be obtained. In fine 
weather the Consul often took his wife and children out 
for a drive in the afternoon, which Mrs. Jarvis greatly en- 
joyed. She never ceased to find rest and recreation in 
the beauties of scenery and fresh air. The writer has at- 
tained to a considerable age, and been in many families, 
but she can truly say she never saw a more devoted self- 
sacrificing wife, or one who studied with more care the 
tastes, wishes and comforts of her husband. Truly it 
might be said of her, "Her price is far above rubies. The 
heart of her husband cloth safely trust in her. She look- 
eth well to the ways of her household and eateth not the 
bread of idleness. Her children arise up and call her 
blessed. Her husband also and he praiseth her. " "Let 
her own works praise her. " 

By slow degrees she had every room repapered, painted 
and carpeted, which wrought a great change and gave the 
house a bright and cheerful appearance. The Consul 
bought Turkey carpets for the two south parlors, which 



214 MRS. WILLIAM JARVIS 

opened into each other, both warm, pleasant rooms. After 
his return from Europe he advocated the useful far above 
the ornamental. Mrs. Jarvis had two windows full of 
flowering plants, in the culture of which she was very 
successful, and a bright open wood fire made the winter 
parlor very cheerful. The children too had their canaries, 
fine singers, of which the Consul was very fond. Had 
not Mrs. Jarvis made the wilderness to blossom as the 
rose ? 

At the time of Mr. Jarvis' return from Europe money 
was very scarce with the farmers, and to accommodate them 
he loaned them money at six per cent, took a mortgage on 
their farms and let them keep it so long as they paid their 
interest annually. It was a great help to them and in a 
few years the number of farmers who availed themselves 
of this privilege was surprising. This was only one of 
his constant efforts to help his countrymen. 

In August, 1821, their first son was born, which occa- 
sioned great rejoicings. When the family physician con- 
gratulated the Consul on this event, he replied, " I have 
always thanked God for all the girls he has sent me; I 
am not more thankful for a son. " This son outlived two 
other sons, and became the staff and stay of his parents 
in old age. He was named Charles, for the Consul's 
father. Their next, a son, was named William ; and the 
next Thomas Jefferson. In August, 1825, William, a 
lovely boy, died suddenly after a fortnight's illness, to the 
great grief of the whole family. The others being ill the 
Consul took them to Nahant for sea air, which restored 
them to health. 

On their return they made a visit in Salem at Mr. J. 
E. Sprague's, who had married Miss Sarah Bartlett, his 
first wife's sister. Mr. Sprague had a large pleasant 
house, and he and his lovely wife were very happy. In 
1826, Mrs. Jarvis had a constant succession of guests 



OF WEATHERSFIELD, VERMONT. 215 

from May. In July, Mr. and Mrs. Duncan, a bride and 
groom from Haverhill on their wedding tour, came for 
a visit. During their stay twin daughters were added to 
Mr. and Mrs. Jar vis' family group. 

In December, 1831, Mrs. Jarvis had another daughter, 
Catherine Leonard, and in May, 1835, her youngest, 
Louisa Bailey. 

The children had a teacher at home in childhood, and, 
as soon as they were old enough, Mrs. Jarvis used her 
influence with her husband to have them placed at the 
best schools the country afforded. The sons were sent to 
Exeter Academy to fit for college. 

As Mary and Elizabeth began to grow up they had 
friends and parties of their own, and their kind mother 
did all in her power to promote their enjoyment. In 
September, 1829, Mary married Hampden Cutts, Esq., 
an emiuent lawyer of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and 
a lineal descendant of Robert, one of the three brothers 
Cutts who first emigrated to that place. Everything 
that could be done Mrs. Jarvis did for the comfort and 
happiness of this her first daughter who was married. 

In September, 1830, a year later, Mrs. Jarvis had the 
misfortune to lose her father, Hon. Bailey Bartlett, who, 
crowned with years and honors, was removed to God's up- 
per kingdom, and his tender wife survived him but one 
year. All his daughters were married except Catherine 
who had been devoted to her parents. In February, 
1833, Elizabeth, Mr. Jarvis' second daughter, married 
David Everett Wheeler, a prominent lawyer of New York 
City. After the marriage of her sister Mary she had done 
nearly all the reading and writing for her father, and he 
missed her exceedingly. Harriet was Mrs. Jarvis' next 
daughter to be married, in 1843, to Rev. J. De Forest 
Richards. 



216 MRS. WILLIAM JARVIS 

Anne, Mrs. Jarvis' first born, was the young lady now 
at home. She inherited her mother's industry, order and 
perseverance, her father's conversational talents and love 
of reading. She was greatly beloved by father, mother 
and sisters. She married Hon. Samuel Dinsmoore of 
Keene, N. H., and they were a very happy couple. 

After so many of his daughters were married, the 
Consul was desirous to have the children and grandchil- 
dren assemble round him at Thanksgiving and sometimes 
at Christmas. It was a Herculean task for Mrs. Jarvis 
to prepare for so many guests to dine and pass two or 
three nights, as those at a distance came invariably the 
day before and remained until the day following, and 
there were often as many as thirty together. Few ladies 
would so often have undertaken it, but Mrs. Jarvis' pow- 
ers seemed equal to every demand on her energy and ex- 
ecutive ability. 

These gatherings were a great pleasure to her husband 
— a great festival to the children and grandchildren, and 
Mrs. Jarvis enjoyed the glorious reunions. The Consul's 
cousins in Claremont were always invited to dine and pass 
the evening. Mrs. Jarvis' plum puddings and mince pies 
were the admiration of all that partook of them, and the 
elaborately furnished table bore testimony to her care and 
skill. 

It was at a Christmas gathering in 1841 that Thomas 
Jefferson (whose name was changed to William), after 
his brother William's death, was taken ill with pneumo- 
nia, Christmas morning, and died in just a week from 
that day. It was a most grievous affliction to Mr. and 
Mrs. Jarvis. He was a tenderly loved son, and when he 
passed upward the shock was so great that his mother 
fainted away. 

In the spring the Consul determined to add another 






VERMONT. 217 



story to his house, thus making four more sleeping rooms 
and many closets, a great convenience to Mrs. Jarvis and 
the daughters, and which their Thanksgiving parties ren- 
dered absolutely necessary for the accommodation of their 
guests. About this time Mr. Jarvis gave the land for a 
church, and Mrs. Jarvis gave liberally towards its erec- 
tion and the support of the pastor. 

Her sister Abby had married Rev. Mr. Kimball, and 
he was the third pastor settled over the church. He 
preached alternately there and at Ascutneyville, where 
they had a pleasant residence. It was a great happiness 
to Mrs. Jarvis to have her sister established near her, and 
they often met at each other's houses. 

The daughters of the family were fast passing away. 

Elizabeth died in 1848, leaving a sorrowing husband 
and two children. Margaret, in the bloom of youth, 
preceded her suddenly in 1847 at the age of twenty-one 
years. It was a terrible grief to her twin sister Sarah. 
In 1849 Mrs. Dinsmoore, at the height of her prosperity 
(her husband having just been elected Governor of New 
Hampshire) surrounded by loving friends, passionately 
loved by her husband, was attacked with brain fever. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jarvis went to Keene to see her and found her 
very ill. The fond mother again went to Keene with her 
son Charles, but only in time to see the vital spark leave 
the body ; a very heavy loss to Mr. and Mrs. Jarvis and 
an irreparable loss to her two little boys. 

Sarah, who had married her second cousin, Dr. Samuel 
G. Jarvis, was next taken. In July, 1855, after a tedious 
illness, she too was summoned to join the blest assembly, 
leaving her husband and two little boys inconsolable. The 
only unmarried daughters, Kate and Louisa, had been ab- 
sent a good deal at Mrs. Sedgwick's school at Lenox, 
and other places, but returned home in 1849, before Mrs. 

HIST. COLL. XXIV 14* 



218 MRS. WILLIAM JAR VIS 

Dinsmoore's death, to take their turn in reading and writ- 
ing for their father and aiding their mother. 

Now a change came over the dear old family mansion. 
The happy hearts and cheerful voices of the children no 
longer cheered it, except on rare occasions. The mail 
coach that so often brought friends and letters and papers 
twice a day had ceased. The railroad had been built on 
the other side of the river ; the Weathersfield mail was 
left at Clare mont Station, and a mail carrier was employed 
to convey it. This change was much felt by both Mr. and 
Mrs. Jarvis. The public house was closed (there were 
no horses now to change for the coach) and after a while 
the store. There was a paralysis in all business. As years 
increased, Mrs. Jarvis' health became impaired. She had 
several illnesses, and was obliged to go to the seashore 
to recruit, with one of her younger daughters. The for- 
titude with which she bore up under bodily pain and dis- 
ease was remarkable. In all times of emergency she was 
cool and self-possessed. 

Mr. Jarvis had always suffered more or less with rheu- 
matism and his weak eyes, and though his mental faculties 
remained unimpaired and vigorous, yet his bodily infirm- 
ities increased. Mrs. Jarvis was scrupulously attentive 
to every detail that could promote his comfort and health. 
During the last years of his life he required many atten- 
tions, and she was a most careful and gentle nurse. Their 
son Charles was a great blessing to both parents. He had 
relinquished the practice of the law, to devote himself to 
them, and never was there a more self-sacrificing devoted 
son. 

In April, 1859, the Consul had a slight paralytic shock 
and was never well again. He continued until October; 
when (surrounded by his faithful wife, children and some 
of his grandchildren and three of his wife's sisters), at 



OF WEATHEKSFIELD, VERMONT. 219 

the age of eighty-nine years, the corruptible put on in- 
corruption ; the mortal, immortality. It seemed as if the 
light of that household had gone out. 

Relatives came from Boston, New York and the vicin- 
ity to attend, the funeral, which was a very large one. 
Mrs. Jarvis survived her husband ten years ; her son de- 
cided to remain with his mother to smooth her declining 
years. His first work was to introduce modern improve- 
ments in the house, to make it more comfortable. This 
had been completed and a beautiful home provided for 
them both, when the war of 1861 broke out. 

He believed it his imperative duty to give himself up 
to the service of his country, and in a few months he en- 
tered the army. It was a bitter, bitter trial to his aged 
mother. A very strong affection existed between them, 
and she could not at first be reconciled to this sacrifice. 
Her fortitude and strength of mind enabled her at last to 
submit to it, though not without much suffering. The 
year after the Consul died, her daughter Kate married 
Leavitt Hunt, Esq., of New York City, and she and her 
youngest sister Louisa immediately set out on a tour in 
Europe. Ere the separation from her son took place, 
Mrs. Jarvis invited her brother Bailey, his wife and two 
: daughters to reside with her. Her son begged as a per- 
isonal favor of his aunts Mrs. Longley and Mrs. Sprague 
ito spend six months with his mother, knowing how much 
happiness their society afforded her. 

Mr. Hunt returned to America soon after the outbreak 
! of the war and entered the army as aid to General Heintz- 
elmann. He was stationed at Arlington Heights and 
i Washington ; and his wife and wife's sister were with him. 
! After enduring incredible hardships and suffering, at the 
,end of a year, Major Charles Jarvis was permitted to come 
>home for a few weeks on a furlough. When he rejoined 



220 MRS. WILLIAM JARVIS 

his regiment his mother accompanied him as far as Bos- 
ton, and remained there as long as his business detained 
him. When the final parting came, the son returned three 
times to bid her farewell. It seemed as if he could not 
tear himself away from her. It was their last farewell. 
Two months after his return to his regiment came a tele- 
gram to his sister, Mrs. Cutts, in Brattleboro, that he 
had been shot in North Carolina and his remains were 
coming on with an escort of officers. She immediately 
forwarded the telegram to her dear mother, and hastened 
to her on the first train. Who can describe the grief 
and anguish of that bereaved mother, when the tidings 
reached her ! But she bore the agony without a tear un- 
til her daughter reached her, when she fell on her neck 
and her grief burst forth in tears and sobs of anguish. 
Ere the sealed casket, draped with flags, and the military 
escort arrived, she was calm and self-possessed, and ready 
for the duty of the hour. It was an irreparable loss to his 
mother. She never recovered from it. Letters of con- 
dolence and sympathy flowed in upon her. Her noble son 
was greatly respected, and every one felt the tenderest 
sorrow for this sorely bereaved and venerated mother. 
In the summer of 1868 she spent some weeks with her 
widowed sisters Mrs. Longley and Mrs. Kimball in Hav- 
erhill. Mrs. Sprague had died, surrounded by her sisters, 
children and nieces, two or three years before. Soon after ■ 
Mrs. Jarvis' return her daughter Harriet, with her two* 1 
youngest children came on from Alabama, where she had 
resided with her husband and family for some time, to 
visit her much loved mother. Her coming on seemed quite 
providential ; in a few days afterwards her mother had a 
paralytic shock. She thought her end was approaching 
and sent for her sisters and daughters. She seemed re- 
joiced to see them, and her expressions of aifection were 



OF WEATHERSFIELD, VERMONT. 221 

very touching. She was perfectly calm and patient, and 
grateful for every attention. She said one day, "I never 
knew any one have so much done for them. Were I a 
queen, I could not receive kinder ministrations." 

Her son-in-law, Dr. S. Gr. Jarvis, was her attendant 
physician, and an own son could not have been more af- 
fectionate, respectful and watchful over her. 

As she grew more comfortable, the family returned to 
their homes, leaving her daughter Harriet and an excel- 
lent nurse with her. In January, she had another attack, 
and once more summoned her dear ones around her. She 
had sweet words of love for each, and calm and peaceful, 
trusting in the great Redeemer, she fell asleep January 
12, 1869, aged eighty-one, and awoke in Heaven the just 
made perfect ! She was greatly loved and respected by 
all, for her many noble and estimable qualities of heart, 
and mind. She was laid at rest in the beautiful cemetery 
a quarter of a mile from the house beside her husband and 
children. Two sisters, two brothers and four daughters, 
survived her. 

It is no more than just to conclude this sketch by a 
brief notice of the noble woman who wrote it. 

The virtues described by her so vividly were faithfully 
portrayed in her own life. Of her family of nine children 
she survived all but three. Her husband died four years 
before her in April, 1875. This sketch of her father's 
second wife was written only three years previous to her 
death, and never published. She inherited her father's 
love of justice, and from a number of distinguished an- 
cestors, among whom may be mentioned Sir William 
Pepperrell, Chief Justice Sewall, Colonel Church and oth- 
ers, came a variety of talents, happily combined in her- 
self. She is known as the author of a life of her father, 
written between his death, and that of his wife's and pub- 



222 MRS. WILLIAM JARVIS. 

lished in 1869, under the title of "Life and Times of Wil- 
liam Jarvis." She also published many minor contribu- 
tions in various papers. Her strength of character and 
sweet disposition were ever the most prominent features 
of her life. She was extremely social in her nature, and 
delighted ever in having her friends and relatives around 
her. None could help responding to the warmth of her 
affection. She passed away in 1879, loved by all with 
intensity, leaving a beautiful record to which it would be 
difficult to do justice. 



Note.— Since the writing of this sketch in 1876, Mrs. Jarvis' brothers and sisters 
have all followed her, except Mrs. Abby Bartlett Kimball, who survives at a green 
old age, the only living member of a once powerful, noted family. 

While this article has been in type and its issue deferred by an unavoidable delay, 
the youngest daughter of Mrs. Jarvis has also passed away. Miss Louisa Bailey 
Jarvis died at Weathersfield, Vermont, Jan. 5, 1888, and was interred in the family 
plot. The only surviving members of the family are the daughters Mrs. Richards 
and Mrs. Hunt. 



GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY OF MANCHESTER, 

MASS., FROM THE EARLIEST SETTLEMENT TO 

THE YEAR 1886. 



BY JOHN PRICE. 



Note. — Explanation of abbreviations : se. = aged; b. = born; bapt. 
= baptized; d. = died; m. = married; dau. = daughter; unm. = 
unmarried. Old style is used previous to 1752 ; after, new style. 

N. B. Any of the descendants of Wm. Allen, the early settler of 
Manchester, who have information differing from, or in addition to, 
the genealogy of the Allen family as here given, would oblige the com- 
piler by furnishing him with that information through Box 28, Man- 
chester Post Office. 

It is not claimed that the genealogy of the Allen family is perfectly 
correct, but is as nearly so as the facilities for the object obtainable 
would furnish the facts. 

1 William Allen, one of the first settlers of Man- 
chester, Massachusetts, was born in 1602. He was from 
Manchester in England, and came over to Cape Anne, 
now Gloucester, for, and with, the Merchants' or Dor- 
chester Co. in 1624, the members of that company re- 
maining there for about three years, erecting a house for 
their accommodation and carrying on the business of fish- 
ing ; but, not succeeding as well as desired, they left Cape 
Anne, went to Naumkeag and there took up their resi- 
dence, and were there on the arrival of Governor Endecott 
and the settlers who came with him in 1628. 

According to the deposition of Richard Brackenbury of 
Beverly taken Jan. 20, 1680 (when he was eighty years 
old), in which he deposes "that he came to New England 
with Gov. Endecott & landed at Salem 6 th of Sept., 1628, 
& found living there, old Goodman Norman, & his son, 

(223) 



224 GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY 

William Allen & Walter Knight & others, & that they 
came over in what was called the Dorchester Co . 

They had sundry houses built in Salem, as also John 
Woodbury, Roger Conant (his son Roger first child born 
in Salem), Peter Palfrey, John Balch & others ; and also 
that they had a house built at Cape Anne, for ye Dor- 
chester Co. which house was pulled down by Gov. Ende- 
cott's order, and brought to Salem" (Essex Inst. Hist. 
Coll., Vol. XIII, p. 138). 

William Allen probably resided in Salem until about 
1640, when he removed to Manchester, then called "Jef- 
fries Creek," a part of Salem. He was admitted freeman 
May 18, 1631. He was one of the petitioners in 1640 
to the General Court for " Jeffries Creek" to be erected 
into a village. 

He was one of the selectmen of the town in 1645 (the 
year when the town was incorporated, it being the ninth 
in Essex Co.) and also in 1668, and probably in many 
other years the records of which are lost. 

He was a carpenter and built the first frame house in 
the town on the plain, so-called, where he resided. 

Tradition says that he also built the first sawmill which 
was located near the residence of the late T. P. Gentlee, 
Esq., and just above the stone bridge which spans the 
stream ; and on the stream to which it gave the name of 
"Sawmill Brook" which name it still retains. 

This William Alleu was the progenitor of most of the 
numerous families of Aliens who have resided in this town 
and vicinity. In the Salem records he is said to have 
been an "influential and enterprising citizen." He sold 
his house in Salem to John Bridgman 9 th of 4 th mth. 
1650. 

He married Elisabeth Bradley in 1629 or '30. She 
was born 1603 ; died 1632. 



GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 225 

Children : 

i Persis, b. Feb.—, 1631. 

2 ii Samuel, b. Jan. 8, 1632. 

His first wife dying 1632, he married, second, Elisa- 
beth , about 1633. 

Children : 

iii Elizabeth, b. Sept.—, 1634. 

iv Deborah, 1 bapt. 23-2mo., 1637. 

v Bethiah, bapt. 16-1 lmo., 1639; d. Feb.—, 1640. 

3 vi Onesiphorous, bapt. 3-5mo., 1642. 

vii William, bapt. Sl-Smo., 1646; j h unkDO wn. 

viii Jonathan, bapt. 29-5mo., 1649; ) 

He died May 10, 1678. 

His will is recorded in the 72nd folio of the first book 
of Essex Probate Records, dated 7 th June, 1678, proved 
26 th 4 th mo., 1679. 

Herein he styles himself * William Allen Sen. of Man- 
chester," makes his wife Elisabeth full and sole executrix 
of his property, to be disposed of after her death. In 
his will he gives to his " son Samuel, the remainder of the 
25 acre lot of the upland, and a share of the meadow." 

To his " sons Onesiphorous and William my whole 50 
acre lot, and an acre of salt marsh at lower end of my or- 
chard." 

It is remarkable that both of these sons had houses of 
their own, and were to have lands adjoining them. 

In the inventory presented which amounted to £186 
10s. among other lands and effects are mentioned fifteen 
acres of upland lying on the bounds of Beverly, joining to 
Wenham Great Pond, also two oxen, one cow, two heifers, 
two sheep and a horse. 

The widow Elisabeth testified that her husband William 
Allen did not give his son Samuel a double portion for 

iFrom records Salem First Church. 
HIST. COLL. XXIV 15 



226 GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 

the reason that he, at the time of his marriage, helped him 
to build a house and gave him three cattle. William Allen 
and his wife were among the original members of the First 
Church in Salem, where the children of his second wife 
were baptized. 

SECOND GENEEATION. 

2 Samuel 2 (William 1 ) born Jan. 8, 1632; married 
Sarah Tuck of Beverly, about 1660. He died in 1700. He 
resided at "Old Neck" and possessed a large landed estate 
there. 

Children, all probably born in Manchester : 

4 i Samuel, b. Aug. 4, 1663; bapt. 28-8mo., 1665, at Salem. 

5 ii John, b. Feb. 12, 1666. 

ill Sarah, b. Mar. 12, 1668; m. William Hassam, Dec. 4, 1684; 

d. 1711. 
iv William, b. Mar. 18, 1670; d. Dec. 29, 1696. 

6 v Joseph, b. June 26, 1672. 
vi Alice, b. Sept. 20, 1674. 
vii Rachel, b. Feb. 19, 1677. 

viii Elisabeth, b. Mar. 18, 1679; m. Thomas Lee, Nov. 28, 1717; 
d. 1720. 

7 ix Benjamin, b. June 4, 1681; bapt. Oct. 2, 1681. 

8 x Jonathan, b. Sept. 4, 1684; bapt. Oct., 1684. 

Samuel Allen was one of the selectmen in 1676, 1677, 
1688, 1693. 

3 Onesiphorous 2 ( William 1 ) baptized 3-5mo., 1642 ; 
married Martha , about 1668. 

Children, all born in Manchester : 

i Martha, b. Apr. 16, 1670. 

ii Mary, b. May 17, 1672. 

iii Onesiphorous, b. July 13, 1674; history unknown. 

9 iv William, b. Mar. 7, 1677. 
10 v John, b. May 17, 1679. 

vi Richard, b. Dec. 10, 1684; history unknown. 

vii Arabelah, b. Oct. 6, 1686; d. Apr. 16, 1748; unm. 

He was one of the proprietors of the 400 acres. He 
died 1718. 



GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 227 



THIRD GENERATION. 

4 Samuel, jr. 3 {Samuel, 2 William 1 ) born Aug. 4, 
1663 ; married Abigail Williams, Mar. 17, 1686. 

Children, all born in Manchester : 

i Sarah, b. July 14, 1687; m. Samuel Crow, Nov. 1, 1707. 

ii Abigail, b. June 10, 1690. 

iii Samuel, b. Oct. 7, 1692 ; died young. 

iv Hannah, b. May 22, 1695; m. Edward Lee, 1721. 

v Rachel, b. Oct. 1, 1698. 

11 vi Samuel, b. Aug. 1, 1701. 

12 vii Jeremiah, b. June 26, 1704. 
viii Martha, b. Jan. 26, 1706-7. 
ix Jerusee, b. Jan. 24, 1712. 

Samuel Allen, jr., married, second, Sarah Tuck of 

Beverly, May 1, 1717. 

5 John 3 {Samuel 2 William 1 ) born Feb. 12, 1666; 

married Elisabeth , 1689. She died 1725. He 

died 1737. 

Children, born in Manchester : 

i John, b. Nov. 9, 1690; history unknown. 

ii Sarah, b. June 23, 1692 ; d. young. 

iii Jacob, b. Mar. 13, 1696-7; history unknown. 

iv Elisabeth, b. May 18, 1699; m. Robert Leach, jr., Feb. 23, 

1725-6. 

v Hannah, b. Mar. 18, 1701; m. Edward Lee, July 11, 1721. 

13 vi Josiah, b. April 28, 1703. 

vii Sarah, b. Sept. 28, 1706 ; m. James Killock of Gloucester, 
Dec. 7, 1738. 

14 viii James, b. Aug. 26, 1708. 

ix Amos, b. May 26, 1711 ; lost coming from Virginia, 1754. 

15 x Ezekiel, b. , 1716; lost at sea Nov. or Dec, 1752. 

His first wife dying, he married, second, widow Marga- 
ret Hilton, Dec. 8, 1727. She died Nov. — , 1763, aged 
84. He was selectman 1702. 

Child : 
xi Nehemiah, b. , 1734; d. Jan. 20, 1749-50. 






228 GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 

6 Joseph 3 (Samuel, 2 William 1 ) born June 26, 1672; 
married Catharine Leach, Oct. 28, 1696, born Oct. 1, 
1680; died 1711. 

Children : 

16 i Joseph, b. Aug. 12, 1697. 

17 ii Samuel, b. Jan. 23, 1698-9. 

18 iii Benjamin, b. July 15, 1702. 

iv Kobert, b. May 8, 1705 ; not traceable. 

v Percillah, b. Apr. 10, 1707. 

vi Isaac, b. May 30, 1709 ; > M unknown . 

vii William, b. May 21, 1711 ; 5 

His first wife dying 1711, he married, second, Sarah 

Knowlton, Jan. 20, 1712-13. 

Children : 

viii Catharine, b. Dec. 27, 1713. 
ix Moses, b. Oct. 7, 1715 ; history unknown. 
x Sarah Knowlton, bapt. Dec. 8, 1717. 

xi Elisabeth, b. Feb. 24, 1718; m. Stephen Cross, Feb. 15, 
1738-9. 

7 Dea. Benjamin 3 (Samuel, 2 William 1 ) born June 

4, 1681; married Abigail Hill, , 1705. She was 

born , 1678, and died Mar. 30, 1720. He died 

Feb. 22, 1747. 

Children, born in Manchester : 

i Abigail, b. Sept. 13, 1706. 

19 ii Bartholomew, b. July 26, 1708. 
iii Abigail, b. Nov. 19, 1710. 

20 iv Elisha, b. May 25, 1711. 

v Lydia, b. Feb. 23, 1712-13; m. William Hooper, jr., Nov. 12, 
1730. 

21 vi Stephen, b. Oct. 22, 1714. 

vii Nehemiah, b. Feb. 15, 1717; pub. July 23, 1738, to Elisabeth 

Pierce, 
viii Sarah, b. Mar. 11, 1719-20; d. April 9, 1720. 

He married, second (after the death of his first wife), 
Sarah Tuck of Beverly, Dec. 8, 1720. She died Sept. 
25, 1749. 



GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 229 

Child : 

ix Benjamin, b. ; was lost at sea in the spring of 1748. 

He was selectman in 1714, 1721, 1725, 1734, 1735. 

Benjamin Allen and Samuel Lee were the first deacons 
of the Congregational Church, chosen as such at the for- 
mation of the church about 1716. He served till his death, 
a period of thirty-one years. 

8 Jonathan 3 {Samuel, 2 William 1 ) born Sept. 4, 
1684 ; married Mary Pierce, 1709, who died 1762, and he 
died Dec. 4, 1768. 

Children, all born in Manchester : . 

i Miriam, b. Aug. 27, 1710 ; m. Andrew Hooper, Nov* 4, 1729. 

22 ii David, b. May 25, 1711. 

23 iii Jonathan, b. Mar. 24, 1713. 

24 iv Azariah, b. Dec. 9, 1714. 

v Malachi, b. Dec. 19, 1716; d. Sept. 6, 1717. 

25 vi Mallaca, b. Nov. 25, 1718. 

26 vii Jacob, b. June 13, 1721. 

27 viii John, b. Aug. 24, 1723. 

ix Luke, bapt. June 12, 1726 ; not traceable. 

x Joseph, b. Sept. 3, 1727; d. young. 

xi Joseph, b. July 6, 1729 ; history unknown. 

xii Mary, b. July 18, 1730 ; m. Jacob Lee, Feb. 6, 1753. 

9 William 3 (Onesiphorous 2 William 1 ) born Mar. 7, 
1677 ; married Sarah Walker, Nov. 19, 1700. She was 
born 1678, and died Dec. 1763. 

Children : 

i Martha, b. Oct. 23, 1702. 

ii Mary, b. Sept. 27, 1704 ; m. Josiah Lee, Apr. 25, 1737. 

iii Sarah, b. May 25, 1707. 

10 John 3 (Onesiphorous 2 William 1 ) born May 17, 
1679 ; married Alice Bennett in Beverly, Nov. 15, 1705. 

Child : 
i Eunice, b. July 28, 1710; m. King Calf, Feb. 24, 1733. 



230 GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 

11 Samuel 4 (Samuel? Samuel, 2 William 1 ) born Aug. 
1, 1701; married Sarah , 1718. 

Children : 

i Sarah, bapt. May 31, 1719. 

ii Hannah, b. Apr. 29, 1721; m. Solomon Driver, Dec, 1742. 

28 iii Samuel, b. Mar. 4, 1722-3. 

29 iv Ambrose, b. Dec. 27, 1724. 

v Jeremiah, b. Apr. 16, 1727 ; history unknown, 
vi Jerusha, bapt. Aug. 24, 1729. 

30 vii William, b. June 9, 1731. 

31 viii John, b. July 30, 1733. 

ix Abigail, bapt. Apr. 29, 1737. 

x Joseph, bapt. Dec. 3, 1738; history unknown. 

xi Dorcas, bapt. Aug. 3, 1740. 

xii Michael, bapt. Aug. 22, 1742; history unknown. 

xiii Mary, bapt. Mar. 23, 1745. 

He was town clerk in 1740, and selectman in 1753. 

Samuel was a merchant, and built the house that stood 
where the house of Mr. Jacob Cheever now stands. He 
sold his estate in Manchester and removed to Chelmsford, 

Mass. 

12 Jeremiah 4 (Samuel? Samuel? William 1 ) born 
June 26, 1704; married LydiaTuck of Beverly, Nov. 14, 
1727, who was born Nov. 18, 1705, and died Jan. 26, 
1782. He died July 15, 1777. 

Children : 

32 i Jeremiah, b. Apr. 6, 1728. 

ii Lydia, b. June 8, 1730; m. Aaron Lee, Apr. 3, 1751. 

iii Eunice, b. Nov. 24, 1734; m. Edward Lee, Feb. 10, 1751-2. 

iv Abigail, bapt. Aug. 2, 1741. 

13 Josiah 4 (John? Samuel? William 1 ) born April 
28, 1703 ; married Margaret Hilton, Nov. 12, 1724. She 
was baptized May 26, 1706. 



GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 231 

Children, probably all born in Manchester : 

i Josiah, bapt. June 27, 1725 ; d. young, 
ii Jacob, bapt. Dec. 18, 1726; history unknown, 
iii Margaret, bapt. Sept. 22, 1728 ; m. Stilson Hilton, July 23, 
1747, and d. Sept. 7, 1799. 

33 iv Josiah, bapt. Aug. 30, 1730. 

v Amos, bapt. Apr. 21, 1734; lost at sea, Mar., 1770. 
vi Abigail, bapt. Aug. 24, 1735. 

His first wife dying, he married Mary Foster ; married 

in Wenham, Apr. 25, 1744. 

Children : 

vii James, b. Oct. 19, 1746 ; history unknown, 
viii Jacob, b. Mar. 22, 1747-8 ; history unknown, 
ix Annis, b. July 9, 1751 ; d. Feb. 12, 1783. 
x Elisabeth, b. Oct. 27, 1754; d. Dec 5, 1754. 

Josiah was killed by the Indians, in the spring of 1758. 

14 James 4 (John, 3 Samuel, 2 William 1 ) born Aug. 
26, 1708 ; married Jerusha , Dec. 13, 1767. 

Children : 

i Elisabeth, b. June 7, 1769; m. Nathan Lee, May 22, 1787. 

ii Molly, b. Sept. 23, 1771 ; m. Joseph Perry of Portland, Dec. 3, 

1801. 
iii James, b. Aug. 24, 1774; m. Nov. 6, 1803, Anna Lee. 

15 Ezekiel 4 (John, 8 Samuel, 2 William 1 ) born 1716 ; 
married Sarah Hassam, daughter of Jonathan and Mary 
(Bennett) Hassam, Apr. 19, 1749. She was born Dec. 
25, 1727 ; died Sept. 12, 1803. He was lost at sea, No- 
vember or December, 1752. 

Children : 

34 i Ezekiel, b. June 22, 1749. 

ii Benjamin, b. July 23, 1751; lost at sea, 1767. 
iii Jonathan H., b. July 29, 1753; history unknown. 

16 Joseph 4 (Joseph* Samuel, 2 William 1 ) born Aug. 
12, 1697 ; married Anne Edwards March 3, 1752. She 



232 GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY, 






was born June 26, 1730. He was !ost at sea, November 
or December, 1752. 
Child : 

i Anne, bapt. Jan. 7, 1753; d. Jan. 11, 1753. 

17 Samuel 4 {Joseph? Samuel, 2 William 1 ) born Jan. 
23, 1698-9 ; married Hannah Marsters about 1740 or 
1741. She was born May 3, 1720. 

Children : 

i Michael, b. Aug. 18, 1742. 

ii Thomas, b. June 7, 1744; lost at sea Mar., 1770. 

iii Mary, b. Mar. 12, 1745-6. 

iv Zadock, b. Feb. 23, 1748-9 ; not traceable. 

v Anna, b. Sept. 28, 1750; d. Oct. — , 1750. 

vi Jeremiah, > twms . C bapt. Feb. 2, 1752. 

vii Zerubbabel, 5 ' ( bapt. Feb. 2, 1752; d. Feb. 21, 1752-3. 

viii Anna, b. Sept. 18, 1754 ; m. Jacob Lee, Mar. 6, 1770. 

18 Benjamin 4 (Joseph*, Samuel 2 , William 1 ) born 

July 15, 1702 ; married Kemember , 1729. She 

was born 1702 ; died Sept. — , 1763. He died Nov. 30, 
1760. 

Children : 



r, 

\ twins ; ff. Jan. 15, 1737-8. 
r, ) ( b. Jan. 15, 1737-8 ; lost at sea, Mar. 



Joseph, bapt. Aug. 16, 1730 ; lost at sea, 1758. 
ii Andrew, bapt. May 20, 1733. 

iii Abigail, b. Aug. 22, 1735 ; m. Jeremiah Allen of Gloucester, 
Mar. 20, 1760. 

35 iv Ezra, X^u 

36 v Bartholomew, 

— , 1770. 
vi Eunice, b. Mar. 13, 1740; m. Obed Carter, Dec. 18, 1760. 

37 vii Andrew, b. Apr. 15, 1743. 
viii Rachel, b. Sept. 18,1746. 



19 Bartholomew 4 (Benjamin? Samuel, 2 William 1 ) 
born July 26, 1708 ; married Abigail Cressee of Salem, 
Nov. 13, 1729. She was born Oct. 15, 1707. 



GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 233 

Children : 

i Abigail, b. Aug. 19, 1731 ; m. Daniel Cressee of Beverly 
ii Sarah, b. Feb. 4, 1732-3. 

Bartholomew was lost at sea, Mar., 1770. 

20 Elisha 4 (Benjamin* Samuel, 2 William 1 ) born 
May 25, 1711; married Hannah Leach, Oct. 24, 1738. 
She was born Sept. 10, 1719 ; died Oct. 6, 1785. He died 
Aug. 1, 1780. 

Children : 

i Elisha, b. July 3, 1740 ; probably died young. 

ii Hannah, b. Jan. 13, 1741-2 ; d. Oct. 24, 1757. 

iii Patience, b. Feb. 8, 1743-4; d. Oct. — , 1757. 

iv Sarah, b. Oct. 11, 1746; m. John Hill, Mar. 12, 1765. 

v Benjamin, b. Dec. 3, 1748 ; lost at sea, 1767. 

vi Elisha, b. June 26, 1752; d. June — , 1753. 

vii Patty, b. May 11, 1754; d. Mar. — , 1778. 

viii Nathaniel, b. Aug. 5, 1756; d. Dec. — , 1757. 

21 Stephen 4 (Benjamin, 3 Samuel, 2 William 1 ) born 
Oct. 22, 1714; married Elizabeth Lee, July 14, 1737. 
She was born July 10, 1720; died Aug. 24, 1794. He 
died Dec. 9, 1798. 

Their first child, Nehemiah, was born in Manchester, 
when they I'emoved to Beverly where the remainder of 
their children were born as found on the Beverly Records ; 
afterwards they removed back to Manchester and died 
there. 

Children : 

i Nehemiah, b. Oct. 22, 1741. 

ii Nathaniel, b. May 30, 1744 ; ra. Joanna Thorndike of Bev- 
erly, April 19, 1778. 

iii Elizabeth, b. Oct. 9, 1746; m. Joseph Haskell, Dec. 11, 1766. 

iv Joseph, bapt. Oct. 12, 1746. Elizabeth and Joseph were 
probably twins. 

v Thomas, b. Dec. 26, 1748; d. at sea Mar., 1770. 

vi Anna, b. May 10, 1751. 

HIST. COLL. XXIV 15* 



234 GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 

vii Ruth, b. Mar. 29, 1753; ra. John Cheever, April 13, 1802. 

viii Amos, bapt. June 8, 1755; d. at sea, Mar., 1770. 

ix John, b. May 1, 1757; lost at sea, 1777. 

x Susanna, b. Oct. 1, 1759; m. John Knight, Nov. 11, 1779. 

xi Rachel, b. Sept. 17, 1762 ; ra. Isaac Lee, , 1784, and d. 

May 15, 1862, se. 99 yrs., 8 mos. 
38 xii Stephen, b. May 30, 1764. 

22 David 4 (Jonathan* Samuel, 2 William 1 ) born May 
25, 1711 ; married Mary Hibbard, Jan. 15, 1732-3. She 
was born Dec. 22, 1706. 

Child : 

i Elizabeth, b. Oct. 16, 1734; m. Samuel Samples, Jan. 16, 
1755, and had four children; she m., 2d husband, Eleazer 
Crafts, Jan. 6, 1767, and they had six children. She d. 
Mar. 16, 1824, 3d. 89 yrs., 5 mo. 

23 Jonathan, jr. 4 (Jonathan? Samuel? William 1 ) 
born Mar. 24, 1713; married Priseilla Lunt of Ipswich, 
Dec. 24, 1734. 

Children : 

i David, b. Oct. 25, 1736; d. Nov. 8, 1752. 
ii Rachel, b. Jan. 8, 1738-9; m. Jonathan Herrick, Jan. 5, 1758. 
39 iii Jonathan, b. Mar. 16, 1742. 

iv Priseilla, b. May 6, 1747; m. Andrew Lee, Dec. 25, 1765. 

v Henry, b. Nov. 30, 1749; d. Nov. 13, 1752. 

vi David, bapt. Sept. 16, 1753; history unknown. 

vii Henry, b. July 3, 1755; d. July 30, 1757. 

viii Molly, b. Sept. 29, 1759; d. Oct., 1764. 

Priseilla his first wife dying, he married, second, pub- 
lished Apr. 28, 1764, Sarah Dodge of Beverly, May 29, 
1764. 

24 Azariah 4 (Jonathan? Samuel? William 1 ) born 
Dec. 9, 1714; married Lydia Hooper, Jan 15, 1735-6. 
(Baptisms taken from the Records of the Congregational 
Church.) 



GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 235 

Children : 

i Azariah, bapt. Jan. 1, 1737. 

ii Lydia, bapt. Oct. 28, 1739; d. . 



iii Isaac, } . c bapt. May 24, 1741 ; d. Jan. 12, 1753. 
40 iv Azariah, 5 twins ; \ bapt. May 24, 1741. 



v Abner, bapt. May 22, 1743 ; d. Dec. 2, 1760. 

vi Anna, bapt. Dec. 29, 1745 ; m. Dec. 7, 1762. 

vii Edward, bapt. Oct. 2, 1748; d. Oct. — , 1748. 

viiiLois, bapt. Oct. 29, 1749; m. Daniel Morgan, Dec. 31, 1767. 

ix Lydia, bapt. Sept. 2, 1753; m. James Brown, Dec. 11, 1770. 

Azariah lost at sea, November, or December, 1752. 

25 Mallaca 4 {Jonathan? Samuel? William 1 ) born 
Nov. 25, 1718 ; married Priscilla Hooper, Feb. 28, 
1739-40. She was born Mar. 24, 1720; died Nov. 7, 
1752. He was lost at sea, November, or December, 1752. 

Children : 

41 i Malachi, b. Mar. 10, 1740-1. 
ii Priscilla Lee, b. June 8, 1743. 

iii Elizabeth M., bapt. May li, 1747. 

iv Simeon, b. July 12, 1750; m. Hannah Brown, Dec. 30, 1772. 

26 Jacob 4 {Jonathan? Samuel? William 1 ) born June 
13, 1721 ; married Sarah Lee, Jan. 3, 1743-4. She was 
born April 21, 1723 ; died July — , 1765. He died Mar. 
23, 1805. 

Children : 

i Sarah, b. (date torn off) ; bapt. Nov. 23, 1746. 

42 ii Jacob, b. April 23, 1749. 

iii Lucy, b. Nov. 3, 1751; m. George Towgel of Marblehead, 

Sept. 13, 1772. 
iv Bethiah, b. Feb. 5, 1755; m. 1st, Samuel Driver, Dec. 1, 

1772; m. 2nd, Aaron Lee. 

43 v Isaac, b. Feb. 6, 1758. 

vi Amos, b. June 8, 1761; lost at sea Mar., 1770. 

He married, second, Mary Tarring, published Oct. 13, 
1765, and had one child. She was born July 20, 1740 ; 
died Aug. 18, 1815, aged 76. 

Child : 

44 vii Nathan, b. July 25, 1768. 



236 GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 

27 Dea. John 4 (Jonathan, 3 Samuel? William 1 ) born 
Aug. 24, 1723 ; married Lydia Osborne or Osment, pub- 
lished Dec. 30, 1744 ; married in Beverly, May 26, 1745. 
She was born Nov. 6, 1728 ; died Nov. 6, 1777. He died 
Feb. 28, 1788. 

Children, all born in Manchester: 

i John, bapt. Aug. 31, 1746. 

ii Nehemiah, bapt. Nov. 13, 1748 ; d. young. 

iii Lydia, b. Dec. 5, 1750; m. Samuel Edwards, Dec. 27, 1770. 

45 iv Nehemiah, b. Nov. 24, 1753. 

46 v David, b. Feb. 10, 1755. 

vi Annis, b. May 1, 1757; m. Asa Herrick, Jan. 29, 1778. 

vii Ruth, b. Oct. 8, 1759; d. Nov. — , 1759. 

viii Joanna, b. Sept. 29, 1760; m. John S. Girdler, Dec. 7, 1779; 

d. Aug. 30, 1841. 
ix Molly, bapt. June 19, 1763. 
x Betsey, b. Jan. 9, 1767 ; m. Thomas Stevens of Marblehead, 

May 9, 1786. 

His first wife dying, he married, second, Elizabeth Pit- 
man of Marblehead, Oct. 12, 1780. He was selectman 
1759, 1762, 1763, 1764 to 1769, inclusive, 1777, 1779 to 
1781; town clerk 1777, 1778. He was chosen deacon 
Feb. 16, 1758, and served till his death, thirty years. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 

28 Samuel 5 (Samuel,* Samuel, 3 Samuel, 2 William 1 ) 
born Mar. 4, 1722-3 ; married Sarah Marsters ; published 
Nov. 17, 1750 ; married Feb. 20, 1750-1. She was born 
Nov. 26, 1728; died Feb. 27, 1815, aged 87. He died 



Dec. 12, 1814, aged 92. 
Children : 

Twin children, b. 1752; d. a few days old. 
i Benjamin M., b. May 1, 1753; lost at sea, spring 1774. 
ii Ruth, b. July 25, 1755 ; m. Nehemiah Allen, Dec. 8, 1774. 
v Samuel, b. Sept. 25, 1757; d. Mar. — , 1781. 
' Ede, b. Dec. 11, 1761; m. Robert Knowlton of Hopkinton 
N. H., Nov. 23, 1780. 






GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 237 

29 Ambrose 5 (Samuel? Samuel? Samuel? Wil- 
liam 1 ) born Dec. 27, 1724; married Mary Bear, Feb. 
27, 1745-6, born Aug. 21, 1728 ; died May 9, 1799. He 
was lost coming from Lisbon, 1756. 

Children : 

47 i Ambrose, b. May 17, 1749. 

48 ii Samuel, b. Mar. 9, 1750. 

iii Molly, b. April 6, 1751 ; d. May 9, 1799. 

iv Jerusha, b. Jan. 15, 1753; m. Benjamin Croweil, Aug. 17, 
1775. 

v Elizabeth, b. Aug. 4, 1756; m. William Hassam, May 15, 
1780. " She was published first to him July 22, 1775 ; but 
he was seized by a press-gang shortly after and served 
nearly five years on board a British frigate during the 
greater part of the revolutionary war. He then suc- 
ceeded, with a number of others in making his escape, 
and returning home was published the 2 d time Ap'l 29, 
1780, and was married as above. She died Feb. 10, 1833" 
(Hassam Family Genealogy, p. 6). He d. April 9, 1833. 

30 William 5 (Samuel? Samuel? Samuel? Wil- 
liam?) born June 9, 1731 ; married Abigail Hooper, 
Nov. 7, 1751. She was born Nov. 10, 1733. 

Children : 

49 i William, b. Dec. 3, 1752. 

ii Abigail, b. May 23, 1755; d. Aug. 29, 1774. 

60 iii John, b. Aug. 5, 1757. 

iv Lydia, b. Sept. 20, 1760; d. Sept. 1, 1765. 

51 v Hooper, b. Jan. 4, 1763. 

vi Asa, b. July 4, 1766; d. Dec. 23, 1767. 

vii Samuel, b. Sept. 10, 1768; d. Sept. 22, 1769. 

viii Lydia, b. Aug. 14, 1770; d. Sept., 1775. 

ix Child, b. , 1771 ; d. Nov. 13, 1773. 

x Daniel, bapt. Aug. 9, 1772. 

xi Nabby, bapt. Oct. 27, 1776. 

31 John, jr. 5 (Samuel? Samuel? Samuel? Wil- 
liam 1 ) born July 30, 1733 ; married Sarah Ringe or 
Rust of Gloucester, Dec. — , 1756. She was born Oct. 
27,1736. 



238 GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 

Child : 

i Anna, b. Dec. 31, 1758. 
His first wife dying, he married, second, Mrs. Ruth 
Lee, April 19, 1768. She was born Sept. 7, 1748. 
Children : 



ii John, b. Sept. 13, 1769; d. Dec. 16, 1769. 

iii John, b. Jan. 5, 1771 ; d. Mar. 23, 1771. 

iv Ruth, b. June 18, 1772. 

v David, b. Aug. 30, 1774. 

vi Ethan, b. Aug. 30, 1777. 

vii Lydia, b. Jan. 7, 1780; m. George Hall, Sept. 16, 1802. 

viii Elizabeth, b. Feb. 21, 1782. 






32 Jeremiah 5 (Jeremiah* Samuel? Samuel? Wil- 
liam 1 ) born April 16, 1728; married Eunice Gardner, 
June 17, 1748. 

Children : 

52 i Jeremiah, b. April 6, 1749. 

ii Eunice, b. April 27, 1751. 

iii Abigail, b. July 23, 1753. 

iv James, bapt. Dec. 7, 1755. 

v Daniel, b. Mar. 15, 1758. 

vi Oliver, b. May 3, 1760; d. Feb. — , 1765. 

vii Nathaniel, bapt. Sept. 18, 1763. 

33 Josiah, jr. 5 (Josiah? John? Samuel? William 1 ) 
born Aug. 30, 1730; married Rebecca Tewksbury, Nov. 
14, 1754. She was born July 14, 1732 ; died in Beverly, 
1821, aged 80. He died in 1777, in the Revolutionary 
War. 

Children : 

i Rebecca, b. Jan. 27, 1758; m. Nicholas Woodbury of Bev- 
erly, Dec. 28, 1785. 
ii Josiah, b. Aug. 23, 1763. 

iii Thomas, b. Oct. 24, 1765; d. June 17, 1787, at sea. 
iv Margaret, b. Sept. 19, 1767; d. Feb. 13, 1773. 

34 Ezekiel 5 (Ezekiel? John? Samuel? William 1 ) 
born June 22, 1749 ; married Mary Proctor, Aug. 25, 



GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 239 

1791. She was born in Essex, Nov. 30, 1765. He died 
Aug. 20, 1794. 
Child : 

i Ezekiel, b. Nov. 3, 1792; d. Mar. 9, 1873, ae. 81; unm. 

She married, second, Maj. Burley Smith, Oct. 24, 
1799 ; died Aug. 14, 1832. 

35 Ezra 5 {Benjamin? Joseph? Samuel? William 1 ) 
born Jan. 15, 1737-8; married Lucy Bennett, Dec. 23, 
1760. She was born April 10, 1741. 

Children : 

i Lucy, bapt. Sept. 11, 1763; d. Sept. — , 1765. 
ii Ezra, b. April 26, 1766. 

Their father was lost at sea in 1765. 

36 Bartholomew 5 {Benjamin? Joseph? Samuel? 
William 1 ) born Jan. 15, 1737-8 ; married Jane Mor- 
gan, Mar. 18, 1760, who was born Aug. 18, 1738. 

Children : 

i Jacob, b. , 1760 ; d. Oct. 23, 1774. 

ii Jenny, b. July 4, 1761. 

iii Anna, b. Jan. 18, 1764; d. Nov. — , 1765. 

iv Rachel, b. Sept. 1, 1765; ra. Isaac Lee, jr., Dec. 18, 1783. 

v Benjamin, b. Sept. 19, 1767. 

vi Bartholomew, b. Aug. 19, 1769. 

He died at sea, Mar. — , 1770. She married, second, 
Lawrence McLaughlin, Aug. 31, 1772. 

37 Andrew 5 {Benjamin? Joseph? Samuel? Wil- 
liam 1 ) born April 15, 1743 ; m. Elizabeth Killam of 
Wenham, published Dec. 26, 1766. 

Children : 

i Andrew, b. Aug. 26, 1768; d. Sept. 26, 1769. 

ii Oliver, b. Aug. 10, 1769. 

iii Andrew, b. Mar. 21, 1771. 

iv Betty, b. April 16, 1773 ; d. May 14, 1775, 



240 GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 

38 Stephen 5 (Stephen? Benjamin? Samuel? Wil- 
liam 1 ), born May 30, 1764; married Betsey Baker, Dec. 
25, 1787. She was born Mar. 13, 1770; died Feb. 4, 
1846, aged 76. He died Sept. 2, 1805. 

Children : 

i Betsey, b. Dec. 23, 1789 ; m. Thomas Wells of New Hamp- 
shire, Mar. 22, 1807. 

ii Nancy, b. Jan. 9, 1791; m. James Knowlton, June 14, 1813. 

iii Joah, b. Mar. 15, 1795 ; m. Enos Merrill of Hopkinton, N. H., 
Mar. 23, 1817. 
53 iv Stephen, b. May 13, 1797. 

v Oliver, b. Oct. 12, 1801. 

vi Susan, b. Mar. 16, 1803; m. Samuel Crowell, Nov. 20, 1825; 
d. Mar. 5, 1847. 

39 Jonathan 5 (Jonathan? Jonathan? Samuel? Wil- 
liam 1 ) born Mar. 16, 1742 ; married Sarah Dodge, 1764. 

Children : 

i David, b. June 30, 1765 ;d. Sept., 1765. 

54 ii Jonathan, b. Oct. 23, 1766. 

55 iii Daniel, b. July 16, 1768. 
iv Elisha, bapt. Apr. 5, 1770. 
v David, b. Feb. 7, 1772. 

vi Mark, b. Feb., 1775; d. Aug. — , 1775. 
vii Mark, b. Feb. 9, 1777. 
viii Sarah, > twins . f b. Feb. 20, 1779. 
ix Molly, 5 ' ( b. Feb. 20, 1779. 

x Rachel, bapt., Sept. 2, 1781. 



[lb be continued.'] 



HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS 

OF THE 

ESSEX INSTITUTE. 

7ol. XXIV. Oct., Nov., Dec, 1887. Nos. 10, 11, 12. 
OUR NEW DOMAIN. 



Few spots in America, of equal area, possess a greater 
wealth of local history than the block of about four acres 
if land bounded by Essex, St. Peter and Brown streets 
,nd Washington Square in Salem. Besides enclosing two 
arge libraries located here for a generation, and now num- 
►ering together some seventy-five or eighty thousand vol- 
umes, enriched with works of art, and likely to retain their 
►resent domiciles for many years to come, these four 
treets bound a level tract which has been successively the 
Lome of such interesting characters as the gallant Captain 
jardner who fell while leading his men against King Philip 
,nd the Narragansetts in the great swamp fight of 1675, 
,nd Major, the Honorable William Browne, a famous pre- 
evolutionary magnate whose mansion-house became after- 
yards the residence of William Gray, at one time the 
argest ship-owner in the United States, and was occupied 
s that famous hostelry and stage house, the Sun Tavern, 
rom 1800 until its disappearance on the erection of the 
banning building, now Bowker Block. 

This square is also the location of the birthplace of Pres- 
ott, and of the residence of Capt. Joseph Peabody and of 
lis son, Col. Francis Peabody; the house owned by the 

HIST. COLL. XXIV 16 (241) 



242 OUR NEW DOMAIN. 

former having been erected and occupied by the Honorabl 
Nathan Read, who is claimed to have been the first invent 
or to apply steam-power to propulsion on land and water 
and having been demolished in 1855 to make way fo 
PlummerHall. The mansion-house of Capt. JosephWhite 
the scene of the most dramatic crime ever perpetrate< 
in New England and later the residence of the Honor 
able David Pingree ; the Andrew house, in his boyhood 
a favorite visiting place of Governor Andrew, which tha 
great magistrate never outlived the hope of possessing 
and the house in which the Nestor Governor Bradstree 
died, March 27, 1697, after passing therein the last yean 
of his protracted and eventful life, — all these are include( 
within the designated limits. In the early years of th< 
settlement the town pound was also within or near them an( 
Brown street was designated for a time as "y e lane leading 
from prison lane to y e pound." Since the year 1865 thh 
interesting locality has been the resting place of all tha 
remains of probably the oldest church edifice in the Union 
a meeting house erected in 1634 by the first religious SO' 
ciety gathered on the soil of New England and used 03 
them under the guidance of Hugh Peters and Roger Wil 
liams, for school and municipal as well as church pur- 
poses, until 1672, — the very burr, as it were, which helc 
and protected, at that early day, the priceless kernel 
New England Congregationalism. 

It has been thought well in connection with the estab- 
lishment this year, for the first time, of the Essex Institute 
in a local habitation of its own, to put on record in 1 
brief summary what these crowded acres have to tell. 

It is much to be regretted that diligent research has 
failed to determine to which of the original settlers these 
acres were at first granted. Lucie Downing, sister o\ 
Governor Winthrop, wife of Emanuel Downing who seems 



OUR NEW DOMAIN. 243 

to have been "an adventurer" as early as October, 1629, 
and to have come over probably not before October 21, 
1637, and certainly as early as the spring of 1638, in 
which year Felt finds him to have been a member of the 
first church, to have taken the oath of freeman and to have 
been granted land, — this Lucie Downing, the mother of 
the famous Sir George, who gave his not unsullied name 
to Downing street in London and Downing College at 
Cambridge, conveys, August 8, 1656, these four acres to 
Joseph Gardner in the words following, viz. : 
12° : 6° m° : 1656 

Lucie Downing of Salem in New England by y e advice 
Concent & allowance of Em : Downing her husband as ap- 
pears by seve 11 Letters und r his hand hath given graunted 
& confermed to Joseph Gardner there son a mesuage or 
tenem* in Salem scituate upon fower acres of ground Xn- 
tire hauing y e comon on y e east, y e streete or highway 
fro y e meeting house to y e harbour on y e south & a lane 
that goes to y e north River on y e west w ch sd p r misses y e 
s d Lucie giues unto y e s d Joseph as his dowry & mariage 
porcon w th Ann y e daughter of y e s d Emanuel & Luce 
Downing his wife as appears by a writing dated y e 8 Au- 
gust 1656 : this is entered by way of causion. 
witness to y e deed 

W m Hathorn 

George Norton 

Mr Downing before leaving England had expressed to 
Governor Winthrop his wish to secure a house either by 
lease or purchase in advance of his coming. He writes 
"To the Honourable his verie loving brother John Win- 
throp Governor of the Massachusetts in New England," in 
these words : 

"Good Brother : 

. . . . Its noe small comfort to me that I haue hope 



244 OUR NEW DOMAIN. 

ere long to enioy your Companie, I purpose God willinge 
to sett forth hence in the begynning of Aprill at furthest 
and to take your sonne hence with me." 

"I follow your councell in coming to the bay before I 
resolve where to pitche. I pray helpe me to hire or buy 
some howse (so as 1 may sell ytagaine if I shall remove) 
in some plantacion about the Bay. Thus for present 1 
take leave and rest leaving you and your affayres to y e 
blessed protection of y e Almighty. 
Your assured and louing brother, 

Em. Downinge." 
21 9ber 1637. 

That Mr. Downing had a mansion house here as early 
as 1644, is put beyond doubt by his deed of mortgage ac- 
knowledged before Mr. Deputy Governor Winthrop, De- 
cember 20 of that year, granting to Thos. Fowle and John 
Winthrop, Jr., Esq., "his mansion house at Salem wl 
foure Acres more or lesse thereto adjoineing, and twenty 
Acres more purchased of M r Endecot lyeing upon y e South 
River." The Mansion House and four acres would seem 
to be the same as the "mesuags or tenem 1 " conveyed by 
Lucie Downing to Joseph Gardner in 1656, and there are not 
wanting astute conveyancers who suppose from the terms 
of this mortgage that the homestead as well as the " twenty 
Acres more lyeing upon y e South River " were both "pur- 
chased of M r . Endecot." The mortgage further recites a 
deed dated the eighth day of June, 1640, " whereunto is 
annexed a bound of Sixe hundred pound " to secure said 
Fowle and Winthrop. But it was only in November, 1640, 
that the General Court established a system of registering 
deeds substantially like the admirable one now in use in 
New England and other parts of the Union, but not yet 
adopted in the old country. It is described in an act of 



OUR NEW DOMAIN. 245 

the "Gen'all Co r t held at Boston, y e 7th Day of y e 8th m° 
1640."* 

If any trace of this deed of June, 1640, exists it has es- 
caped notice. But frequent mention of the Mansion House 
pushes its date back to a period about as early as the mort- 
gage to Fowle and Winthrop. In 1649, Hu : Peter is 
writing to his " Hon : frend Iohn Winthrop iu : Esqr at Pe- 
quoit River or elsewhere," about the "100 1 M r Downing's 
house is bound to me for :" and again in 1654, he writes 
him, "M r . Downing is not honest, owes mee 100 1 for which 
his house is bound to mee." Peter Palfray deeds in 1653 
a half acre " over & against Mr. Downing's house in Sa- 



* " For avoyding all fraudulent conveyances, & that every man may know what 
estate or interest other men may have in any houses, lands or other hereditaments 
they are to deale in, it is therefore ordered, that after the end of this month no 
morgage, bargaine, sale or graunt hereafter to bee made of any houses, lands, rents 
or other hereditaments, shalbee of force against any other person except thegraun- 
ter & his heires, unlesse the same bee recorded, as is hereafter expssed: And 
that no such bargain, sale or graunt already made in way of morgage, where the 
graunter remains in possession, shalbee of force against any other but the graunter 
or his heires, except the same shalbee entered, as is hereafter expressed, w th in 
one month after the end of this Conrte, if the ptye bee w th in this iurisdiction, or 
else w th in 3 months after hee shall returne. And if any such graunter, &c, being 
required by the grauntee, &c, to make an acknowledgment of any graunt, &c, by 
him made, shall refuse so to do it shalbee in the power of any magistrate to send 
for the party so refuseing, & comit him to prison wt h out baile or mayneprize, until 
hee shall acknowledg^the same. 

And the granntee is to enter his caution w th the record?, & this shall save his 
interest in the meane time ; & if it bee doubtful whether it bee the deed or graunt of 
the pty, hee shall bee bound w th sureties to the next court, & the caution shall re- 
maine good as aforesaid. 

And for recording all such bargaines, &c, it is further ordered, that there shal- 
bee one appointed at Ipswich, for w ch M r Samn : Symonds is chosen for that Co r t 
to enter all such bargaines, sales, &c, of all lands, &c, w th in the iurisdiction of that 
Court; & Mr. Emanuell Downing is chosen in like soi't for the iurisdiction of the 
Court of Salem; & all the rest to bee entered by M r Stephen Winthrope, the re- 
corder at Boston. 

And that it is not intended that the whole bargaine, sale, &c, shalbee entered, 
but onely the names of the graunter & grauntee, the thing & the estate graunted, 
& the date; and all such entryes shalbee certified to the recorder at Boston w th in 
6 months yearely. 

And it is ordei'ed, that the fee for every such entry shalbee 6d. 

And it is hearby declared, that this order shall not extend to any grauut made 
or to bee made by any towneship." 



246 OUR NEW DOMAIN. 

lem," and John Horn (Orne) uses it as a landmark in his 
deed of two years later. 

It would be unsafe to conclude that Downing was dead 
in 1656, because he does not join his wife in the deed to 
Gardner. During his absence in England in 1643 she had 
executed a deed to John Pickering, to which the subse- 
quent assent of her husband seems to have been accepted. 
" Seve 11 Letters und r his hand " may mean his several deed. 
A deed to John Marston in 1658, with other allusions, 
give some ground to think him then living. 

No mention occurs of him in New England earlier than 
the two grants in Salem made "unto Mr Emanuell Down- 
ynge 16 th of y e 5 th moneth 1638." 

Mr. Downing's interest in the New England venture 
probably dated as far back as 1629 and in October of that 
year he seems to have met, at Mr. Deputy Goff 's house in 
London, the members of the committee of the adventurers 
who were to consider of and prepare a scheme for the trans- 
fer of the government to New England. The first volume 
of the "Records of the Governor and Company of the Mas- 
sachusetts Bay in New England" has on its 391st folio an 
entry as follows, under date of the General Court held at 
Boston, September 6, 1638. 

"Whereas Emanuel Downing Esq 1 ' hath brought over at 
his great charges all things fitting for takeing wild fowle 

© © © © o 

by way of duck coy, this Court being desiros to encourage 
them & others in such designs as tend to publike good, do 
give him full liberty to place the same duck coy in some 
convenient place w th in the bounds of Salem, as the town 
& he can agree & that it shall not bee lawful for any^son 
to shoote in any gun w th in halfe a mile of the pond where 
such duck coy shall bee placed, nor shall use any other 
meanes for disturbance of the fowle there ; & if any man 
shall offend . . & if any pson shall be taken shooting, 



OUR NfiW DOMAIN. 247 

or going aboute to shoote w th in y e said limits & being not 
knowne to y e said Emanuel Downing or his servants w ch 
shall attend the said duck coy, it shall bee lawful for them 
to make seizure of his peace & detain the same till the 
cause be heard & determined." 

On the same sixth day of the seventh month, 1638, as 
appears on the first folio of the first book of recorded 
deeds for Salem, John Humphrey, Esq., of Salem, "hath 
graunted unto Emanuel Downing of Salem, Esqu., the 
two ponds and soe much high ground about the ponds as 
is needful to keepe the duck coye private from the disturb- 
ance of plowman, herdsmen . . passing that way w ch 
he may . . as he take not in above fifty acres of up- 
land rounde about the same." This Felt takes to be the 
origin of the name "Coy Pond," near Forest River. 

Mr. Downing was a barrister of the Inner Temple. In 
1633 he appeared before the Privy Council in London in 
behalf of the colony, and again in advocacy of Endecott's 
laws when they were subsequently assailed, and as late as 
September 10, 1653, he was praying the General Court 
for the setting out, by metes and bounds, of lands already 
granted him. 

Influential as Emanuel Downing certainly was in the 
early years of the colony, we know neither the date of his 
birth, of his death, nor of his arrival in New England, nor 
how he became possessed of this valuable property. The 
house which he seems to have built upon it, probably be- 
tween 1640 and 1644, is thought to have occupied a posi- 
tion on Essex street, almost exactly midway between the 
easterly and westerly corners of the field, a little west of 
Plummer Hall, and near the site of the brick mansion erected 
by Capt. Joseph Peabody about 1819-20 and successively 
occupied by his sons Joseph Augustus and Francis. Felt 
thinks it disappeared about 1750 and Col. Benjamin Pick- 



248 OUK NEW DOMAIN. 

man, writing in 1793, states the date of its destruction as 
1755. 

At these dates, it would not have been a ruinously ©Id 
house and, since it was one of the most elegant and pre- 
tentious houses in the colony, it would hardly have been 
hurried out of sight from age or lack of style. It had two 
massive stacks of chimneys and also two transparent, hollow 
columns of lead sash and diamond glass, great lanthorns, 
one on either side the front door, for lighting up the am- 
ple grounds in front, and these rose from the foundation 
to the roof and contained a cupboard-door at each floor of 
the house for inserting candles or other illuminating ap- 
pliances on occasion of festivity or other need of light. 
The house was of no mean dimensions. In 1731-2 it 
was apportioned between the widow and eldest son of 
Benj. Ropes. The widow was assigned dower in the 
western half, which, with a lean-to (variously spelt "linter" 
and otherwise), had a frontage of about twenty-five feet on 
the street. It had its "grate chamber," its "grate starres," 
its "grate entry" and its "grate rume" and underwent, as 
late as 1726, most extensive and costly repairs at the hands 
of Capt. John Green and had its "Shingalls" and its "clay- 
bords" put in order and would seem, at the middle of the 
century, to have enjoyed the "promise and potency" of pro- 
tracted life. The appearance of the house has been made 
familiar by the picture which has the authority of Felt, 
who derived it from a water color painting in possession 
of the Essex Institute, probably done by Bartole in 1819. 
The house was of two full stories with three high gables in 
front, and a chimney and a gable at each end : doubtless 
it had at least "seven gables." 

It was better known as the Bradstreet house, Governor 
Bradstreet, the most valuable citizen, Colonel Pickman 
says, who ever lived in Salem, having come into possession 



OUR NEW DOMAIN. 249 

of it by marrying for his second wife when he was seventy- 
three years of age, Anne, the daughter of Emanuel Down- 
ing, who was left a widow by the tragic and lamented 
death of Capt. Joseph Gardner, Dec. 19, 1675. She mar- 
ried the Governor on the sixth day of the following June, 
at the age of forty-two, after fully protecting her property 
by a marriage settlement which opens in this theocratic 
phrase, "Whereas, by the All-wise Providence of God, 
"there is a marriage intended in convenient tyme betwixt 
"M r Simond Bradstreete of Bostone & Mrs. Ann Gardner 
"of Salem " and is dated, May 2, 1676. She survived her 
second spouse, who died in this house at the age of ninety- 
four, and herself died sixteen years later, April 19, 1713, 
leaving by will her "dwelling house, out-housing, orchard, 
garden and appurtenances, situate in Salem aforesaid, ly- 
ing between Major William Browne's on the west side, 
Capt. Bowditch, William Gedney and Beadle on the east, 
the main street on the south and a lane on y e north" to the 
daughters of Col. John Wainwright of Ipswich, deceased, 
grand-nieces of Madam Bradstreet the testatrix. These 
ladies at once leased the grand old mansion, with which 
they probably had no associations of a sentimental nature, 
for a public house and here was opened by Elisha Odlin, 
first licensed as an Innholder by the General Sessions of 
the Peace at Salem, June 30, 1713, again June 29, 1714, 
and again August 10, 1715, the famous old " Globe Tavern" 
of which Felt finds no mention earlier than 1727, and gives 
no hint that he knew where it was. One Elisha Odlin, 
for licensed innholders in those days were among the best 
of people, appears soon after this as a preacher at "Aims- 
bury" and before December 27, 1715, Benjamin Ropes 
bad become " mine host of the Globe Tavern," for on that 
clay we read in the Sessions Court Records "Benjamin 
Roapes is admitted an innholder in y e town of Salem at y e 

HIST. COLL. XXIV 16* 



250 OUR NEW DOMAIN. 

Sign of y e Globe in y e room of E. Odlin." Benj. Ropes, 
like all licensed landlords, must give sureties " for keep- 
ingc good rule & order and payment of y e King's, his ma- 
gestie's Excise," and he offered on his first bond no less a 
personage than Philip English. He was again licensed 
July 17, 1716 and June 25, 1717. He died before the close 
of this last year, but he died the owner of the Bradstreet 
mansion as well as the Landlord of the Globe Tavern. 
November 1, 1716, he had received from the grand-nieces 
of Madam Bradstreet a deed of the whole property "called 
& known by y e name of y e Globe Tavern." His widow, 
Ann, administered upon his estate and was licensed July 
15, 1718, to carry on the business of the "ordinary," and 
the inventory of his estate, in which the ratio of "pew- 
ter muggs," butts of "Rumm," barrells of "Sydar" and 
half-pipes of Spanish wine to the more sober furniture of 
chamber, kitchen and table is as "monstrous" as FalstafPs 
" one-half pennyworth of bread to this intolerable deal of 
sack," gives a broad hint of what the business of an ordi- 
nary at that time was. This unsuspecting hostess had ac- 
cepted one John Green as surety upon her license-bond 
and soon found herself entangled with her surety in a bond 
of a closer and more enduring nature. He was probably 
a pilot of that name who served the Port Royal Expedi- 
tion in 1710, for he soon appears as Captain John Green. 
"Ann Roapes alias dicta Green " is licensed July 14, 1719 
" in behalf of John Green " and July 28, 1720, and for the 
four years succeeding, he is licensed in his own name. The 
next season finds him ailing or absent and the license is 
issued, June 29, 1725, to John Green by Ann Green his at- 
torney, and the old Globe Tavern knows the Greens no 
more at till or taproom after that season closes. Benja- 
min Ropes, her son by her first marriage, having come of 
age, now takes charge of his mother's estate at her re- 



OUR NEW DOMAIN. 251 

quest ; is licensed for several years as Landlord ; is at the 
cost of forty shillings for a new gate-post with "y e sign 
of y e Globe," in 1726 ; in 1729 pays a tine in company 
with two other Innholders who have " severally contest that 
they had suffered negroes at or in their houses to have 
Punch for which they were payed by them, which is con- 
trary to the Law of the Province, they being taverners. 
Its therefore Considered by the Court that they each pay 
apiece of ten shillings to be disposed of one-half to the 
poor of y e town of Salem and the other to y e informer & 
costs & stand committed till performed." This at the Gen- 
eral Sessions of y e Peace July 22, 1729, and in 1731, he 
closes the ordinary and his probate accounts as well, by 
making partition betwixt his twice widowed mother, his 
sister, his two brothers & himself of the fine old Braclstreet 
Mansion, statelier house than which the Colony had not 
seen, with its " grate-rume " now sunk to those base uses 
sooner or later sure to overtake the waning fortunes of 
so many fine old mansions in every age. 

But it must be clearly understood that the estate left by 
Madam Bradstreet to Mesdames Davenport, Winthrop and 
Dudley, her grand-neices, and by them conveyed to "Benj. 
Roapes, Innholder" was by no means the princely estate of 
four acres with which Lucie Downing with the "allowance" 
of Emanuel, her husband, be she wife or widow at the 
time, had endowed Capt. Joseph Gardner on his marriage 
with her daughter Anne, in August, 1656. 

On the contrary, no sooner had Joseph Gardner become 
possessed of this valuable tract of land than he proceeded 
to set off parts of it. This may have been necessary in 
order to clear the homestead of mortgages and the mort- 
gages may have been necessary in order to build the home- 
stead. To his brother, Samuel Gardner, he conveyed 
first the strip containing three-quarters of an acre, next 



252 OUR NEW DOMAIN. 

adjoining the house and barn on the east and extending 
from Essex to Brown streets — this by deed dated Au- 
gust 13, 1656, — then, in 1659, a second strip of equal area 
lying to the east between the last and the Common, now 
Barton's Corner, so that his brother Samuel then owned 
all east of the homestead lot ; and in the same year 1659, 
he conveyed a one hundred foot strip running along St. 
Peter street, then Prison lane, to Kichard Prince, and 
lastly by " turf and twig " and the most ironclad instru- 
ment which scrivener could devise, he conveyed to Wil- 
liam Browne in 1664 the next strip of one hundred feet 
in width lying to the east of Deacon Prince's purchase 
and extending from Essex to Brown streets and as far east 
as the remaining homestead lot. But at some unknown 
date and in some unexplained manner, Lieut. Joseph had 
also alienated another lot with a narrow frontage of two 
and one-half rods, dividing the grants to Samuel from 
the homestead of which he died seized. This lot, as early 
as September 14, 1671, got into the hands of the But- 
tolphs of Boston, and on that date John Buttolph and 
Hannah, his wife, who was the daughter of Lt. George 
Gardner of Hartford and a neice of Lt. Joseph, convey it 
to Lt. Thomas Gardner. His daughter, Mary, married 
Capt. William Bowdish or Bowditch, the same who gave 
the name of Bowditch's Ledge to the Tenapoo by striking 
on that rock in the "Essex Galley," and in the settlement 
of Lt. Thomas Gardner's estate in 1696, Capt. Bowditch 
came into possession of this easterly moiety of the Plummer 
Hall property. It is described in the Buttolph deed of 
1671, as fenced in by itself, with a dwelling house on it, 
doubtless the one removed by Nathan Read in 1793, and 
as bounded west and north by Joseph Gardner. The old 
house, which Col. Pickman thinks built as early as 1655, 
must have stood, as Col. Perley Putnam, in 1859, said it 



OUR NEW DOMAIN. 253 

did, somewhat further to the east than the successor to it 
which Mr. Read raised in the rear of it in October, 1793. 
An old well, covered with a stone slab, still remains as a 
landmark in the centre of the basement of Plummer Hall, 
and may serve some future antiquary in deciphering these 
ancient bounds. 

So now, from his marriage portion of four acres, which 
had a frontage on the main street or, " highway from ye 
meetinge house to ye harbour " of not far from 625 feet, 
Joseph Gardner before his tragic death in 1675 had parted 
with an acre and one half, including the Institute estate 
and all east of it, to Samuel Gardner, and on the west 
with about as large an area in two estates to Richard Prince 
and William Browne, and also with the Buttolph lot, re- 
taining only to himself the middle acre, or thereabouts, 
with the elegant "homestead, outhousings, barn, sheds 
and trees " and a frontage on the street of about one hun- 
dred and eighty feet. The average depth of the lots va- 
ried little from seventeen poles or two hundred and eighty 
feet. 

The will of Joseph Gardner, dated 1665, left all he had 
to his wife Anne who came into possession in 1675 and at 
once married Governor Bradstreet — so that before the 
house was forty years old, it had a famous history. It had 
sheltered Emanuel Downing, so prominent a man as to have 
his son ranked second, when social rank was the sole crite- 
rion, in the first class in the Catalogue of Harvard. It prob- 
ably sheltered that distinguished son of his who came from 
England with his parents, prepared for college with Rev. 
John Fiske, was a protege of Hugh Peters, a connection 
by marriage, and his father's pastor, " spent," says Upham, 
I his later youth and opening manhood on Salem Farms " 
although he left college in 1642-3, as his mother wrote 
her brother, Governor Winthrop, " strongly inclined to 



254 OUR NEW DOMAIN. 






travill," and Upham thinks, "tended his father's duck- 
decoys at Humphrey's Pond, angled in our brooks and 
made the crack of his fowling-piece reecho through the 
wild woods beyond Proctor's Corner." Possibly this quaint 
old roof-tree may not have looked down upon the mortal 
remains of its gallant young master too early lost in that 
bloody melee with the Narragansetts, of which Major Church 
writes in his "Entertaining History," — " Mr. Church spy- 
ing Capt. Gardner of Salem amidst the Wigwams in the 
East end of the Fort, made towards him ; but on a sudden 
while they were looking each other in the face, Capt. Gard- 
ner settled down, Mr. Church stepped to him and seeing 
the blood run down his cheek lifted up his cap and calling 
him by name, he looked up in his face but spake not a 
word, being mortally Shot through the head." 

Capt. Gardner was the son of Thomas Gardner of Cape 
Ann and later of Salem, who was sent out with the first 
comers to supervise the fishing venture. He is repre- 
sented as a man of standing, and of parts. When the Gen- 
eral Court in May, 1675, divided the Salem Militia into 
two companies he was made Captain of one of them and 
in December following marched his command, ninety -five 
strong, through Dedham Plain and Wickford to the bloody 
field. " Stone- Wall- John's Crew," says Hubbard, "picked 
off some of them while straggling," and these seem to have 
been a Sergeant and two men, Rice and Pikeworth of Sa- 
lem and Batchiler of Wenham. Four others of his com- 
pany, Capt. Gardner among them, were slain in the fray 
and ten wounded and the names of these honored dead 
as well as of the whole company he mustered and led so 
bravely are recorded for all time in the archives of the 
State. 

But if the savagery of the foe, or the poor and primitive 
facilities for transportation, made it impossible to restore 



OUR NEW DOMAIN. 255 

the form of the dead captain to his honored home, and thus 
he was denied the rite of sepulture among the people he 
had marched forth so gallantly to defend, it is not hard to 
conjure up other scenes only less stirring, upon which 
those diamond-glazed windows must have looked out in 
the first century of our colonial life. 

Who shall say what scenes of horror may not have been 
witnessed from the rear of this lofty mansion, when in 1692, 
an unobstructed view across "Downing's Field" showed the 
unhappy victims of the consuming frenzy dragged from 
their innocent homes to the jail in Prison Lane, and from 
their noisome quarters in the jail to Gallows Hill? Who 
shall say that the last agonies of the venerable Corey, 
whose place of death by torture is thought to have been 
the corner of Brown and Howard streets, may not have 
been witnessed from this very roof? Probably the Nestor 
Governor Bradstreet was married in this house and the 
"grate rume" may have echoed with the stately congratu- 
lations of the best quality of the colony on that auspicious 
scene, while the double lanthorn-columns at the doorway 
of the "grate entry" glowed with an unwonted brilliancy of 
candle lights and torches and shed hospitable beams abroad 
over lawn and shrubbery and trellis-vine and shade tree 
on that festal night of leafy June. And while the tavern 
doors stood open, who shall say what train bands tramp- 
ing by on French or Indian inarches, what dusty ranks of 
pikemen and musketeers with their matchlocks and parti- 
sans, with their halberds and helmets of steel, their snap- 
hances, their bandoleers and their leathern jerkins, may not 
have halted, weary and footsore, to refresh themselves with 
the stout ales or sparkling cider of the tap room and bid 
a tremulous good-by to the friendly gathering at "y e sign 
of y e Globe !" 

The title to the homestead from its apportionment in 



256 OUR NEW DOMAIN. 






1731-2 is not difficult to trace, nor does it possess much 
interest for many years. Two of the heirs of Benjamin 
Ropes, innholder, divided the rear or Brown street half 
between them and the Essex street half was allotted, in 
three sections, to Benjamin, the administrator, who took 
the easterly portion of the house and grounds with a street 
frontage of about thirty-three feet, his line running through 
the "grate entry" and the barn, and bounded by Capt. 
Wm. Bowditch on the east. His mother took for dower 
the next portion, consisting of the other half of the house 
and barn, with a street frontage of twenty-five feet or there- 
abouts, and bounding westerly by her second son Thomas, 
who took for his share the remaining strip without build- 
ings, forty feet wide on the street, and bounding westerly 
by a lot granted to Joseph Ropes by his father at the time 
of his original purchase, Nov. 6, 1716, also about two and 
one-half rods wide, bounded by the Browne Homestead 
on the west, and running through to the back lane leading 
to the Training Common. Benjamin Ropes, Senior, had 
further impaired his original purchase by granting a strip 
on the east about as wide as this last, to his neighbor Capt. 
Bowditch, the great grandfather of the astronomer, about a 
month before he died. So that the homestead, as the land- 
lord of the Globe left it, was by no means as grand as 
when he acquired it. Moreover his sons Benjamin and 
Thomas had, before the final apportionment, each built a 
shop of some sort on the lot afterwards assigned him, so 
that the street front was encumbered before 1731 as it 
continued to be for near a century, and this fact confirms 
the statement that the Bradstreet House stood well back 
from the main street as every dignified dwelling house 
should. From the widow and heirs of Benjamin Ropes, 
Innholder, what remained of the Bradstreet homestead es- 
tate passed, by a score or more of deeds interesting only 



OUR NEW DOMAIN. 257 

to the conveyancer, in which figure the well-known names 
pf Miles Ward, Nathaniel Ingersoll, George Williams, 
Peter Cheever, Josiah Dewing and Nehemiah Andrews, 
until the whole title rested once more between January 6, 
1806 and August 13, 1807, in a single owner, with the 
exception of the southwest corner later bought by Col. 
Francis Peabody, and the owner was Capt. Joseph Peabody 
who had owned and occupied the estate on the east of it 
since the opening of the century. In 1819-20, Captain 
Peabody erected the stately brick dwelling house now cov- 
3ring the site, which was occupied successively by his 
joh Joseph Augustus, until his death ten years later, and 
then for thirty years from 1836 by his son Col. Francis 
Peabody. The three great horse-chestnuts which adorned 
its front until within a decade were brought as saplings 
from Judge Putnam's grounds at the old Assembly House 
in Federal street, where Washington had danced a meas- 
ure with Madam Carnes, and were planted by Mrs. Joseph 
Augustus Peabody, Judge Putnam's daughter. Two of 
:hem remain, of which the one next Plummer Hall, from 
some unexplained variety of species, or fortunate circum- 
stance of soil or water, exposure to light or protection 
Tom weather, exhibits its spring foliage in advance of all 
its neighbors with as much regularity as Bonapartists ex- 
sect the famous Napoleon horse-chestnut at the foot ot the 
Jhamps Elysees to put forth each year its leafy welcome 
n the twentieth of March, the day of the return from 
Elba. 

The familiar statuary, now transported to the Collins or 
Elooper estate, once the headquarters of Gov. Gage, t was 
jrought from Europe and placed in front of the Peabody 
nansion during the occupancy of Col. Francis Peabody, 
vho made other changes, improving the access to the car- 
riage entrance on the west by the removal of the Miles 

HIST. COLL. XXIV 17 



258 OUR NEW DOMAIN. 

Ward house, and adding a banqueting hall in the rear which 
probably has had no rival in the county either in the ele- 
gance of its appointments or in the brilliant companies of 
guests its stately walls have welcomed. Upon the death 
of Capt. Joseph Peabody in 1844, the estate was released 
by the heirs to his son Col. Francis, and after the death of 
the latter in 1867, it passed to the present occupant. At 
the rear on Brown street Colonel Peabody had an exten- 
sive family riding-school, with work-shops on the second 
floor devoted to scientific and mechanical experiment. 

The residence next to this on the east, which in 1799 Capt. 
Joseph Peabody bought of Elizabeth, wife of Nathan Read, 
in her right, is described in the deed as the "large mansion 
house of Elizabeth Jeffrey." Madam Jeffrey was the 
widow of Hon. William Jeffrey, clerk of the County 
Courts, and the daughter of Joseph Bowditch, also a well- 
known county officer and wit, whose grandfather, Capt. 
William Bowdish or Bowditch, had married a Gardnerand 
in this way become possessed in 1696 of one portion of 
this estate with a house older than 1671, and in 1716 by 
purchase from Benjamin Ropes, of the other. "At this 
writing," says Col. Pickman in 1793, "Mr. Nathan Read, 
who married Mrs. Jeffrey's only child is building a very 
large house in the rear of this." The house built in 1793 
was designed by Macintire in his best style and was oc- 
cupied by Mr. Read, by the father of the historian Pres- 
cott who was born there in 1796, and later by Captain 
Peabody and by Madam Peabody, his widow, until it dis- 
appeared in 1855 to make way for Plummer Hall. Its 
predecessor, the old colonial homestead of the preceding 
century, stood further towards the east and so far out 
into the street, which was but a lane in its early years, as 
to nearly reach the present curbstone; and so low, or 
rather the street at this point has been so much raised, that 



OUR NEW DOMAIN. 259 

when the late Col. Perley Putnam was at work as a young 
mechanic on the mansion erected by Mr. Read in the rear 
of it, he stepped on a plank from the second floor window 
of the old house into the first floor window of the new one. 
Both were of wood. 

An excellent picture of the fine old Peabody mansion 
which was destroyed before "decay's effacing finger" had 
swept its lines, and which stands there at its best, with its 
great trees before it, and on the easterly side its ample car- 
riage way, stables and horse-sheds extending in the rear as 
though in token that its hospitalities were not withheld even 
from dumb beasts, may be seen prefixed to Ticknor's life 
of William H. Prescott, who first saw the light in one of 
its eastern chambers. 

Of Nathan Read, his career and his inventions, it seems 
well that the publications of the Institute should perpet- 
uate some more extended notice than they now contain. 
His distinguished nephew, Judge David Read of Vermont, 
has made this possible by his elaborate publication of 1860- 
70, and from that work we extract the following account 
ind the correspondence of rare local interest with which it 
jloses. 

Nathan Read was a native of Warren (formerly West- 
ern), Worcester County, Mass. ; born July 2, 1759. His 
mcestors originally came from Newcastle-upon-Tyne ; they 
;hen settled in the County of Kent, where they lived for 
jeveral generations. Thence they emigrated to America at 
m early day, about 1632, and settled in the vicinity of Bos- 
;on, where they resided for many years. His grandfather, 
when the country was new, and there were but few settle- 
ments in that section of the State, purchased a large tract 
)f land in Warren upon which he settled, and where he 
ipent the remainder of his life in the improvement of his 
ancls. His father, Major Reuben Read, was an officer in 



260 OUR NEW DOMAIN. 

the Revolutionary service ; and his mother, whose maiden 
name was Tamison Eastman, was first cousin to Major 
General Nathaniel Greene, of Rhode Island. His father 
was an only son, and resided upon the homestead during 
his life. At the age of fifteen years, Nathan commenced 
his preparatory studies for College, and at the close of the 
summer vacation of 1777, entered Harvard University. 
His parents were desirous that he should qualify himself for 
the ministry, and he attended Professor Sewali's Lectures 
on the Hebrew language. He acquired a good knowledge 
of the language and, by appointment, gave a Hebrew Ora- 
tion at a public exhibition of the University ; and during 
the interval between the death of Professor Sewall and the 
appointment of his successor, Mr. Parsons, he was engaged 
to instruct the class in Hebrew. He graduated in 1781, 
on which occasion he was selected to deliver the valedic- 
tory address. He was distinguished as a scholar, and left 
College with the respect of officers and students. After 
graduating he was engaged in teaching in Beverly and Sa- 
lem, until 1783, at which time he was elected a tutor, in 
Harvard University, where he continued his labors as such 
until the commencement of 1787. He then resigned his 
place as tutor, and entered upon the study of medicine 
with Dr. Edward A. Holyoke of Salem, until October, 
1788, when he gave up the idea of following medicine as 
a profession, relinquished its study, and opened an apoth- 
ecary store in Salem. 

While engaged in the study of medicine with Dr. Hol- 
yoke, and also while in his store, he devoted himself, more 
or less, to study and experiment in the mechanic arts, 
which indeed held a higher place in his mind than his 
medical studies or merchandise. It was during this period 
of time that he invented and constructed his models of a 
steamboat and locomotive carriage. 



OUR NEW DOMAIN. 261 

In October, 1790, he was married to Miss Elizabeth 
Jeffrey, daughter of William Jeffrey, Esq., Clerk of the 
County of Essex, and granddaughter of Joseph Bowdish. 
August 24, 1791, he was elected a member of the American 
academy of Arts and Sciences. April 4, 1795, he removed 
to his farm in Dan vers, aud built a permanent structure 
across Waters' River, which served the double purpose of 
a dam and bridge. In 1796, he and his associates erect- 
ed and put in operation the Salem Iron Factory, for the 
manufacture of chain-cables, anchors and other materials of 
iron for shipbuilding, he having the chief superintendence 
of the work. While thus engaged, he invented and put in 
operation in the factory, designed for its own special use 
and benefit, with a view to the saving of labor and other 
economical purposes, a nail machine, since extensively used 
for cutting and heading nails at one operation, for which 
he received a patent, as the original inventor, from the 
United States Government on the 8th of January, A. D. 
1798. This highly important invention obviated the very 
great labor and expense of the manufacture of those arti- 
cles by hand. 

In October, 1800, he was appointed a member of Con- 
gress for Essex South District, to fill the vacancy occa- 
sioned by the death of Judge Sewall, the late member from 
that district ; and in November, 1800, he was elected by 
the people of the district, a member of the succeeding Con- 
gress, for two years from and after March 4, 1801, and 
was a member during the severe contest in the House of 
Representatives for the Presidency, between Jefferson and 
Burr. 

In February, 1802, while a resident of Danvers, he was 
appointed by Governor Strong a special Justice of the 
Court of Common Pleas for the County of Essex ; and af- 



262 OUR NEW DOMAIN. 

ter his removal from Danvers to Belfast in Maine, which 
was in 1807, he presided as Chief Justice of the Court in 
Hancock County for many successive years. In 1815, he 
was elected an honorary member of the Linnaean Society 
of New England. 

After removing to Belfast, Judge Read gave most of his 
time to agricultural pursuits ; but he often indulged him- 
self in new inventions in the mechanic arts and trying ex- 
periments therein ; and during his whole life these and the 
natural sciences were his favorite study. He invented sev- 
eral useful agricultural implements for some of which he 
took a patent, but constructed them maiuly because he had 
use for them on his farm. His farm consisted of some four 
hundred acres of land, finely situated near the head of Bel- 
fast Bay, lying upon the shore just south of the City of j 
Belfast. His residence overlooked the Bay, with its at- 
tractive scenery ; and here he spent the remainder of his 
life, ever taking a lively interest in all matters of a public 
character, especially such as were designed to improve the 
moral condition, and advance the intellectual and social de- 
velopment of the people among whom he lived. He re- 
garded the cause of education as involving one of his 
highest duties; and at an early day, when the town was 
comparatively new, he was instrumental in establishing a 
high school in Belfast, that the youth of the place might 
be educated at home, the beneficial effects of which have 
long been appreciated. 

He died at his residence in Belfast, January 20, 1849, 
in the ninetieth year of his age, and in the full possession 
of his intellectual powers, except for a few days at the close 
of his last sickness. He possessed a strong constitution, 
and a strong and highly cultivated mind ; his aims were 
high, and he soared above the sordid interests of the world. 



OUR NEW DOMAIN. 263 

He never sought to make himself conspicuous, or to give 
publicity to his attainments or labors, but chose rather 
unobtrusive retirement. His deportment was always gen- 
tlemanly ; his form fine, and his countenance highly in- 
tellectual. His conversation was ever interesting and 
instructive ; and he lived and died with the respect and 
esteem of all who knew him. He was the last surviving 
member of his College class ; and with two exceptions, — 
Judge Farrar and James Lovell — the oldest living grad- 
uate of Harvard University. 

As early as 1788, as already noticed, while a resident of 
Salem, he became especially interested in the purpose of 
applying steam-power to the practical end of propelling 
boats and land carriages. He foresaw the importance of 
attaining such a purpose, and set himself to work to con- 
trive the necessary machinery to effect it, which at that 
time was felt by all intelligent men, who had given their 
attention to the subject, to be a desideratum, a work yet to 
be accomplished. The idea as applied to boats was not 
new ; various experiments had been tried, but were mainly 
directed to the mode of propulsion, without so much atten- 
tion to the motive power ; and all the experiments hitherto 
tried had proved a failure. To show the nature of those 
experiments, I will briefly notice them in their order, that 
the reader may judge of the cause of their failure, and of 
the necessity that then existed of great improvements in 
the steam-engine, in order to make the application of steam- 
power to boats and land carriages successful. 

[Judge Kead's biographer then enters upon an elaborate 
discussion of the claims of various inventors and the prin- 
ciples involved, which, however interesting, would be out 
of place here, and the points of which, having a local in- 
terest and value, are well illustrated in the following cor- 
respondence and documents.] 



264 OUR NEW DOMAIN. 



Salem, January 8, 1791. 

Sir :— I forwarded last week to Mr. Remsen* models of several 
machines, drafts and descriptions of which are enclosed. The model 
of the boiier which I have forwarded, is an improvement upon one of 
those I exhibited last winter. The model I refer to consists of several 
annular vessels placed one above another within the furnace, in such 
a manner as to expose a very large surface directly to the fire. For 
annular vessels, placed in an horizontal position, I have substituted cir- 
cular tubes, placed in a vertical positionf within the furnace, which is 
formed by the boiler itself, in the same manner as the other was. In 
the last boiler, which is stronger, more simple and elegant in its con- 
struction. I have paid less regard to the evaporating surface than in 
either of the others — finding by experiment that the principle of evap- 
oration suggested by your Excellency is perfectly just, when applied 
to close vessels. I am sensible that a pipe was several years since 
made use of by Mr. Rumsey for generating steam, and also perceive 
from the 'Philosophical Transactions' that a tube in the form of a worm 
of a still was used upwards of twenty years ago for the same purpose; 
but I do not know that any other person but myself hath ever constructed 
a tubular boiler, formed in such a manner as to constitute of itself a 
complete furnace. It is about three years since I first projected a 
boiler upon this plan. How far my improvements merit an exclusive 
privilege, the Honorable Board will judge. Should a Patent be granted, 
I suggest it may be delivered to Benjamin Goodhue, Esq., who will 
pay Mr. Remsen all charges that have arisen in consequence of my ap- 
plication. 

I am, with the sincerest respect, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 
Nathan Read. 

To His Excellency Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of State, 
Commissioner of Patents, etc. 



* Mr. Remsen was the Secretary of the Board of Commissioners. 

f In the Scientific American vol. ill, No. 11, new series, p. 174, September 8, 1860, 
the editors say, " The reason why we prefer a boiler with vertical tubes is owing 
to the favorable results which have been obtained witli such a boiler on board the 
United States frigate San Jacinto in comparison with one having the old-fashioned 
tubes. We do not mean one that has the fire returned through the tubes; but water 
tubes, as explained in Isherwood's Engineering Precedents." 



OUR NEW DOMAIN. 265 

The United States : 

To all to whom these presents shall come : 

Greeting : 

Whereas Nathan Read, of Salem, in the State of Massachusetts, 
hath presented a petition to the Secretary of State, the Secretary of 
the Department of War, and the Attorney General of the United States, 
alleging and suggesting that he hath discovered the following useful 
devices, not before known neither used ; that is to say, an improve- 
ment of the boiler of the steam-engine, by constructing it in such a 
manner as to constitute of itself a complete furnace that more effectu- 
ally prevents the loss of heat than any other furnace that is wholly or 
in part foreign to the boiler itself, by reducing its size, and rendering 
it very portable, and at the same time increasing its force, by exposing 
within a small space a very large surface directly to the fire, and by 
connecting it with a reservoir in such a way as to be replenished with 
water with as much safety and conveniency when on board a vessel in 
motion as at rest. Also an improvement of the steam cylinder, by 
which it is rendered more portable and convenient for working in an 
inclined or horizontal position, and which is in the piston, which has 
two stems, or rods, one coming out at each end of the cylinder, and 
alternately acting with equal force and in contrary directions. And 
also a practical mode of driving or impelling boats or vessels of any 
kind in the water or against the current, by means of the chain-wheel, 
or rowing machine, constructed and operating upon the general prin- 
ciples of the chain-pump, and moved by the force of steam or any other 
power, in the same manner the chain-pump is moved ; and praying 
that a patent may be granted therefor. And, whereas, the said discov- 
ery hath been deemed sufficiently useful and important : These are, 
therefore, in pursuance of the Act entitled 'An Act to promote the 
Progress of the Useful Arts,' to grant to the said Nathan Read, his 
heirs, administrators or assigns, for the term of fourteen years, the 
sole and exclusive right of making, using and vending to others to be 
used, the said discovery so far as he, the said Nathan Read, was the 
discoverer, according to the allegations and suggestions of the said 
petition. 

In testimony whereof, I have caused these letters to be made Pat- 
ent, and the Seal of the United States to be hereunto affixed. 

Given under my hand, at the City of Philadelphia, this twenty-sixth 
day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred 
and ninety-one, and of the Independence of the United States of Amer- 
ica the sixteenth. 

George Washington. 
[L. S.] By the President : 

Thos. Jefferson. 

City of Philadelphia, Aug. 26, 1791. 

hist. coll. xxiv 17* 



266 OUR NEW DOMAIN. 






Mem°. — In the summer of 1788 I went to assist Mr. 
Nathan Read in keeping his apothecary shop ; the following 
winter and in the summer of 1789 he was much engaged 
on mechanical and philosophical subjects ; particularly in 
the construction of a steam-engine whose power might be 
advantageously applied to the propelling of boats and car- 
riages ; and in order to ascertain by experiment the effect 
that float-wheels would have upon the boat, I very well 
remember that he had a light boat built by a Mr. Pierce, 
to which was attached a pair of float-wheels to be moved 
by hand — the experiment was tried in Porter's River in 
Danvers. I was not a witness to it, but was told that it 
succeeded to his fullest expectations. The boat was after- 
ward brought back and remained for some time in the back 
part of the shop ; why steam was not applied I then did 
not make inquiries, and soon after leaving his shop for 
other pursuits, I made no further inquiries about it, but 
have since understood it was for the want of a sufficient 
capita] to put it in operation. 

W. Shepard Gray. 
Salem, December, 1816. 



I recollect y e above facts stated by Mr. Gray, and re- 
member to have seen Mr. Read row about y e river in y e 
boat ; but could not ascertain y e time when y e boat was 
made and used. John Prince. 

Belfast, January 27, 1817. 
Hon. Timothy Pickering. 

g IR . * * * * Q n examining my papers at Belfast, I find that it is 
upwards of twenty-six years since I invented the steam-engine, with 
horizontal arms, similar in principle to the engine for which Mr. Trev- 
ethick has recently received a patent in England. I have now in my 
possession a drawing of the engine ; and an accurate description of its 
principles, construction, and operation, and of the manner of connect- 



OUR NEW DOMAIN. 267 

ing it with the boiler, copied in the year 1789, from my original draught, 
by Mr. William Shepard Gray, the cashier of Essex Bank. 

With assurances of my highest respect and esteem, 

N. Read. 



[Judge Read to Hon. Timothy Pickering,* January 27, 1817.] 

"On the same sheet of paper is a drawing, and in the 
same manuscript a description of a steamboat, constructed 
with paddle-wheels, in the same manner they are now used. 
This drawing of the boat was taken about the same time 
from one which I built and rowed myself across Porter's 
River, in Danvers, in the year 1789, in presence of Dr. 
Prince of Salem. I have good reason to believe that this 
was the first boat ever constructed with paddle-wheels, 
with an avowed intention of propelling it by steam. 

"On the 8th of February, 1790, about two months be- 
fore the passing of the act to Promote the Progress of the 
Useful Arts, I presented a petition to Congress for a pa- 
tent for the above and other inventions, as will appear by 
the Journals of the House, and by my petition (if kept on 
file), a copy of which I have preserved. Some months 
after presenting this petition, I unluckily discovered, by 
looking into some of the first volumes of the * Philosophical 
Transactions, ' that an experiment had been made on board 
a French frigate, with a view to ascertain the comparative 
utility of wheels and oars in a calm. 

"Unacquainted with the spirit of the law, and not know- 
ing that a new application was deemed a new invention, I 
took out a patent on a new petition for a steamboat, in the 
year 1791, to be propelled through the water by chain- 
wheels, — scrupulously avoiding the simple wheel, which 
answered my purpose perfectly well, — supposing I should 
not be entitled to a patent for it, in consequence of its hav- 

* Colonel Pickering, as Secretary of State, had been ex-oflicio Commissioner of 
Patents. 



268 OUR NEW DOMAIN. 

ing been applied in another way on board a frigate. On 
the above statement of facts, which I can verify, Query, 
whether a patent for the above inventions, should I take 
one out, would be valid and of any use to me ? 

"The law requires that the invention should not be known 
or used before the application. The engine and boat, with 
paddle-wheels, were not known and used at the time I 
first applied for a patent ; but my application was before 
the passage of the above act. Will my application to Con- 
gress, before the passage of the act, be considered in law 
equivalent to an application to the Secretary of State ? 

" The above questions are interesting to me, and I should 
like to have your opinion upon them when you are at 
leisure, if you will take the trouble to give it. Another 
question on which I should like to have your opinion is, 
whether the experiment made on the boat, constructed in 
the manner above mentioned, and with the avowed design 
of propelling it by steam, will any way invalidate Mr. 
Fulton's patent, so far as it includes the use of paddle- 
wheels of the same construction I invented and used many 
years before he applied for a patent ?" 

Colonel Pickering, of Wenham, Massachusetts, who was 
Secretary of State under the administration of John Adams, 
and a friend and acquaintance of Judge Read during his 
residence in Salem, and supposed to be familiar with his 
inventions, speaks of the invention of paddle-wheels as 
original with him, as late as 1817 ; which will appear from 
the following letters of introduction to Miers Fisher, of^ 
Philadelphia, and Richard Stockton, of New Jersey, given 
him on the occasion of his going to Washington, that year, 
on business connected with the patent-office : — 

Wenham {near Salem), December 4, 1817. 

Dear Sir: — Allow me to introduce to you my much esteemed 

friend, Nathan Read, Esquire, the ingenious inventor and improver of 

several useful machines, on account of which he is now on his way to 

Washington. 



OUR NEW DOMAIN. 269 

I believe you were engaged as counsel for your friend, Colonel 
Ogden, in relation to his controversy with the Fultonites, before the 
Legislature of New Jersey. At any rate, I presume you are acquainted 
with the merits of the case. Mr. Read was the real inventor of the 
essential part of Fulton's machinery — the water-wheels as applied to 
propel boats by steam. Of this he can produce satisfactory evidence, 
which he will show you if your leisure admits. 

I pray that Mr. Read, as a gentleman of science and distinguished 
worth, may receive your attentions. 

With very respectful esteem, 

I am your obedient servant, 

» Timothy Pickering. 

Richard Stockton, Esq. 

Wenham {near Salem), December 4, 1817. 
Dear Sir : You will permit me to introduce to you my worthy 
friend, Nathan Read, Esq., the ingenious inventor and improver of 
several useful machines, for some of which he has obtained patents, 
and is now going to Washington for others. Such a man will find a 
patron in every friend to practical schemes of public utility, and re- 
ceive your attentions in particular. But what especially made me de- 
sirous of your seeing Mr. Read was the recollection of your zealous 
patronage (I think I do not mistake) of Mr. Fitch, in his essays to 
propel boats by steam. Mr. Read will satisfy you that he was the real 
inventor of the grand and essential parts of Fulton's machinery as ap- 
plied to the moving of vessels — the water-wheels ; and stated the same 
in his petition to Congress, in the year 1790, while sitting at New York, 
where it was publicly known, and where Fulton, I take it, aided by 
Chancellor Livingston, began his operations with those wheels. 
With great respect and esteem, 

I am your friend, 

T. Pickering. 
Miers Fisher, Esq. 

Seventeen years later, Judge Read addressed to a friend 
the following exhaustive statement of his claims, with which 
these extracts must close. His allusion to his visit to Wash- 
ington Avhere he boarded in the same house with Dr. Ma- 
nasseh Cutler, at a most interesting period, finds a friendly 
echo in the writings of Dr. Cutler recently collected and 
given to the public. 



270 OUR NEW DOMAIN. 

Belfast, August 22, 1834. 

Dear Sir : Fitch was the first who constructed a steamboat in Amer 
ica; Rumsey was the next. Fitch applied paddles, and could not pro 
pel his boat more than four miles an hour. Paddles were subsequently 
tried on a large scale, and found to be inadequate to the purpose. 
Rumsey at first used a pump, which drew in water at the bow, and 
forced it out at the stern of the boat. He next tried setting-poles for 
river navigation, but without success. Believing their failure was oc- 
casioned by their ill-constructed boilers and complex machinery, and 
believing also that steam might be advantageously applied to land 
carriages, I constructed in the year 1789 a small boiler, which, from 
its characteristic principles, I denominated a Portable Furnace Boiler. 
It occupied but little space, was light and strong, and so constructed 
as to require no other furnace than what itself constituted. It was 
especially designed for steamboats and steam-carriages, a model of 
each of which I had constructed the same year. 

The boat was of sufficient size to carry a man and the necessary 
apparatus to propel it through the water. To the axis, which extend- 
ed across the gunnel of the boat, were fixed two paddle-wheels which 
were constructed on precisely the same principles they now are for 
steamboats. "With this boat, by means of a crank and without a fly- 
wheel, I rowed myself, soon after it was finished, with great rapidity, 
across an arm of the sea, which separates Danvers from Beverly. The 
Rev. Dr. John Prince, of Salem, and several other gentlemen were 
present, and saw the experiment. Of this fact, I have somewhere 
among my papers Dr. Prince's certificate. 

I spent a considerable part of the winter of 1790 in the city of New 
York, and exhibited drawings and descriptions of my steamboat, steam- 
carriage, etc., to President Washington, to whom I had letters of in- 
troduction from General Lincoln, grandfather of the Professor. I also 
showed them to several members of Congress and, I presume, to up- 
wards of fifty other gentlemen (some of them distinguished mechanics) 
in the city of New York, and explained to them the principles of the 
machinery and of the boiler designed for steamboats and land carriages. 

I boarded at Mrs. Wheaton's, in company with Dr. Cutler and Gen- 
eral Rufus Putnam, who were agents of the Ohio Company; and I 
recollect perfectly well, they introduced General Stevens to me, and 
explained to him the principles on which my boat, boilers, etc., were 
constructed. If I am rightly informed, I presume this must have been 
the same gentleman who was afterwards largely concerned in steam 
navigation, and was at first connected with Chancellor Livingston in 
building a steamboat. 

I first petitioned the Board of Commissioners for a patent for a 
steamboat with paddle-wheels ; but, unfortunately, in looking over some 



OUR NEW DOMAIN. 271 

of the first volumes of the "Transactions of the Royal Society," pub- 
lished upwards of a hundred years ago, I discovered that an experi- 
ment had been made on board a French frigate, for the purpose of 
ascertaining the comparative utility of wheels and oars. Supposing at 
that time, in consequence of this discovery, that I should not be en- 
titled to a patent for a boat with paddle-wheels, I took considerable 
pains to invent a substitute, which was a rowing machine, constructed 
on the principle of the chain-pump. 

Having satisfied myself that this would answer a good purpose, 
and be the best substitute I could think of for the simple paddle-wheel, 
which I had successfully tried, I withdrew my first petition to the 
Board, and took out a patent for my new mode of rowing boats, and 
for a Portable Furnace Boiler, which required no other furnace than 
what itself constituted. It was constructed internally with tubes, on 
the same principle, and nearly of the same form, with those now used 
for locomotive engines. 

I was too early in my steam projects. The country was then poor; 
and I have derived neither honor nor profit from the time and money 
expended on them. But it is gratifying to know that the simple 
machinery which forty-five years ago (without any knowledge of its 
having ever been used for that purpose) I selected as the most eligible 
for propelling boats through water, has been since that time success- 
fully used in every quarter of the globe for that purpose. I was, how- 
ever, still more gratified last spring, in viewing a locomotive engine, 
capable of moving a mile in two minutes, put in operation by steam 
generated in a portable boiler, constructed essentially on the same 
principle with one which I invented for that and other purposes about 
forty-six years ago, and for which I obtained a patent the first day that 
any patent was ever issued by authority of the United States. 

I have a distinct recollection, when my petition to Congress was 
read in Congress Hall by the Clerk of the House of Representatives, 
that when he came to that part which related to the application of 
steam to land carriages, a general smile was excited among the mem- 
bers, and the idea was considered there and at Salem, where I had a 
model of a steam-carriage constructed, as perfectly visionary. 

Yours truly, 

N. Read. 

An oil painting of considerable merit, copied on panel 
for the Essex Historical Society, from the likeness of Gov. 
Bradstreet, now hanging in the Senate Chamber at the 
State House in Boston, may be seen in the gallery of the 
Essex Institute, while a likeness of Nathan Read will be 



272 OUR NEW DOMAIN. 

found facing the title-page of the number of these Histor- 
ical Collections for November, 1859, and the Peabody 
Academy of Science has a portrait in oil of Capt. Joseph 
Peabody, an engraving of whose face may also be found 
fronting page 229 of Lewis's History of Essex County. 

We now cross the old boundary line which divided the 
estate conveyed in 1656-9 by Joseph to Samuel Gardner 
from the Downing homestead, and which accordingly con- 
stituted the westerly limit of the Samuel Gardner grant. 
It ran through in a straight course from street to street 
— all the lots but the Buttolph lot seem to have done 
this — and is probably the only one of the early division 
lines running north and south which maintains to-day its 
original course and still extends from "y e streete y fc cometh 
strayte from y e meetinge howse to y e field or trayninge 
place" to "y e lane y* goeth from prisson lane by y e towne 
povvne to y e Comon, comonly called y e penn." So old 
deeds call Essex and Brown streets. It is now marked 
by enduring granite blocks, and divides the grounds and 
buildings of the Essex Institute from those of Plummer 
Hall. 

Next east of the site of Plummer Hall had stood a house 
of great antiquity. Col. Pickman well remembered it and 
supposed it to have been built about 1660 by Mr. John 
Gedney, who died in 1688. Col. Pickman seems to be at 
fault in his conjecture as to its origin, but correct in his 
subsequent statement that High Sheriff William Gedney, 
son of John, lived in it. He died here in 1730. It seems 
to have been the homestead of Samuel Gardner who left 
it by will in 1689 to his son Jonathan. On the death of the 
latter without issue in 1693, his nephew and niece Henfield 
received, by his will, their portion of the homestead es- 
tate, with this house, which they sold by two deeds dated 
1701-7 to Major William Gedney who had married their 
aunt Hannah Gardner, Jonathan's twin sister. In 1732 



OUR NEW DOMAIN. 273 

the house is described as " William Gedney's late dwell- 
ing, formerly Samuel Gardner's" and in 1741, through 
Bartholomew Gedney who held of William's devisee, this 
portion of the Gardner-Gedney homestead passed by deed 
to James Grant, who had married Haunah, a daughter of 
the Sheriff, " William Gedney's Mansion House" still stand- 
ing upon it. The name of Gedney will be recognized as 
one of marked consideration. Besides the High Sheriff, 
Major William, the family furnished the colony with a 
Judge of Probate, a colonel, a physician, a witchcraft 
magistrate and a counsellor of Andros. 

In 1750 the estate passed, with a dwelling house on it, 
by deed of James Grant, to Jonathan Gardner who died 
in 1791, and who, before Nov. 3, 1752 (See Essex Deeds 
B. 97 L. 302) had built a new house upon it which he 
left to his only child and namesake, and he was living 
there in 1793. This second Jonathan died in 1821, leav- 
ing the estate by will to his only child William Fairfield 
Gardner of whom Tucker Daland purchased it in 1834. 
Mr. Daland was one of the able merchants who were trained 
up in that busy counting room of Capt. Peabody in the 
old, framed warehouse at the foot of Elm street, the mas- 
sive timbers of which are still the wonder of the town. 
After occupying the mansion for sixteen years he removed 
it to the northerly end of the tunnel, where it now stands. 
Mr. Daland in 1851 erected in its place the costly, com- 
modious and imposing structure now the domicile of the 
Essex Institute. This continued to be the residence of 
members of his family until 1879 and became the property 
of the Institute in 1885 by purchase from the widow and 
heirs of Dr. Benjamin Cox, who married his daughter. 

In front of the old Gardner-Gedney house stood an an- 
cient and majestic mulberry tree whose branches roofed 
over the whole street and endangered the neighboring win- 

HIST. COLL. xxiv 18 



274 OUR NEW DOMAIN. 

dows by the temptation its luscious fruitage offered to the 
marksmanship of the passing school-boy. It would be 
pleasing, but probably it is not possible now, to connect 
the origin of this ancient tree, which survived the first dec- 
ade or two of the present century, with Lucie Downing, 
nee Winthrop, who conveyed the estate to Joseph Gard- 
ner as the marriage portion of her daughter Ann in 1656. 
The mulberry tree was amongst the earliest and fondest 
recollections of Lucie Winthrop's girlhood. She must 
have frolicked often with her brother John under that 
great, spreading mulberry which shaded the lawn by their 
old-world, ancestral, Groton homestead, and as often, 
doubtless, stained her dainty fingers with its juicy berries. 
In Queen Elizabeth's England, the mulberry was a new and 
favorite tree. Shakespeare too had his, in the garden at 
Stratford, and doubtless they were commoner here in the 
New England of the Stuarts than in our day. For our an- 
cestors at the outset brought all their old-world habits and 
traditions with them and only abandoned or modified their 
ways of living, and that slowly, under the dominating stress 
of their occidental conditions and surroundings. 

But the New England of the Stuarts is gone with the 
Downing house and the ancient mulberries of Shakespeare 
and Adam Winthrop and the Gedney mansion, and even 
the England of great Queen Bess has vanished also. New 
types of life are evolving themselves from past conditions 
on both side of the ocean. We of New England feel the 
influences other than English which are moulding so rap- 
idly and so radically the American life of to-day less force- 
fully than do other sections of the country, but still we feel 
them. As in the coming time we grow more typically 
American and less provincially English, shall we not draw 
a deeper rather than a lessened pride and pleasure from 
the name of New England? 



A HISTORY 



OF 



METHODISM IN SALEM 



BY JAMES F. ALMY. 



A comprehensive history of Methodism in Salem would 
occupy more space than can be allotted to this communi- 
cation which is a mere outline so constructed that the por- 
tions necessarily omitted can readily be supplied from the 
references. 

Jesse Lee was the first of this denomination that preached 
in Salem, July 12, 1790. Kind Joshua Spaulding, the 
pastor of the Tabernacle Church, a man of letters, invited 
him to occupy his pulpit on this occasion. His contem- 
poraries in the ministry were : Rev. Dr. John Prince of 
the First Church, the scientist, inventor, and the life of 
the scientific and literary libraries since incorporated into 
the Salem Athenseum ; Rev. Dr. William Bentley of the 
East Church, a scholar of varied and exteusive attainments, 
whose sermons were marked by freedom and originality 
indicating unitarian sentiments ; Rev. Dr. Thomas Barnard 
of the North Church, a minister in the fourth generation, 
his father, grandfather and great-grandfather having occu- 
pied pulpits in Andover, Newbury and Salem, a gradu- 

(275) 



276 A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 

ate of Harvard, the patriotic minister who in 1775 broke 
off his Sabbath service and with his flock became the first 
named among those who resisted British aggression end- 
ing in Leslie's empty-handed retreat from the North Bridge ; 
and Rev. Dr. Daniel Hopkins of the South Church, scholar 
and teacher, who invites Jesse Lee to preach in his pulpit 
again and again. Probably several of these with mem- 
bers of their congregations were present. What a coterie of 
listeners and what a critical assemblage ! representatives 
of all denominations, save perhaps the English Church of 
which Rev. Nathaniel Fisher was rector, and the Quakers 
who had as yet little fellowship with those who maintained 
a hireling ministry. 

Jesse Lee had a good time in preaching and interested 
the people for he was invited again to the same place and 
yet again, but it is recorded in his journal that, at last, 
objection on the part of the members closed to him the 
churches of Salem. His preaching apparently left no per- 
manent impression. No house nor home, out of which most 
of the New England Methodist churches were born, seems 
to have been opened to his religious service. There is no 
account of conversions or nucleus of a society ; but God's 
records are more reliable than man's and the influence of 
Christian effort never dies. The foundations of the Glas- 
gow Cathedral of David are the same in part as those of 
the humble monastery of St. Kentigern though five cen- 
turies of oblivion rolled between. The legends of St. 
Kentigern and St. Ninian of Galloway were kept alive in 
faithful hearts. So does the work of Jesse Lee knit itself 
to the later Methodism of Salem. 

There are accounts of men and women who witnessed 
for the faith of Wesley through all those years. They 
met for prayer and conference and, later, were connected 
with churches at Marblehead and Lynn. An aged friend 



A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 277 

of mine, who was a clerk in the office of the U. S. Mar- 
shal at Salem, during the war of 1812, informs me that, 
among the English residents who were obliged to report 
to him at stated times, there were Methodist people, and 
names Micklefield and Merritt, well-known families. 

Ezekiel Cooper records in his journal that he preached 
in Dr. Hopkins' church in 1792. The intervening years 
are legendary until Samuel Berry came to Salem from 
Fitchburg in 1815. He gathered the company of Meth- 
odists, not a dozen in all, in a room on Sewall street op- 
posite the site of the present church, and held stated meet- 
ings with them. He was the first practical organizer of a 
society, and he encouraged and sustained the work in Sa- 
lem, with all he had of money or influence, though he 
was not even a local preacher. A baker by trade, produc- 
ing bread of approved quality, he lived and preached the 
gospel as he went from house to house disposing of his 
wares. He made no secret of his Methodism. It was 
common for him to hear his people and faith ridiculed and 
reviled. Once, when told that, excepting himself, his com- 
pany could not pay for a pint of corn he spoke of "the 
handful of corn in the earth, on the tops of the mountains" 
and of the riches of grace his people enjoyed. He died in 
1854, an aged man, but not until his eyes had beheld the 
success of Methodism in Salem. He was an original sub- 
scriber to Z ion's Herald, and I am told that it is still 
continued in his name. We shall often meet him in this 
narration. 

Jesse Fillmore was appointed to Marblehead by the con- 
ference, June, 1818. He preached in South Salem in the 
brick school house, where the fire-engine house now stands, 
October 23 of that year, again at the same place Novem- 
ber 6, a third time at a private house in North Salem July 
9, 1819, and preached fourteen sermons in Salem while 
stationed at Marblehead. 



278 A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 

Brethren from Lynn also held meetings ; B. R. Lewis 
and Salmon Stewart, local preachers, also other local 
preachers, names and residences not given. Reformation 
John Adams preached to a small society in Salem in 1821. 

Jesse Fillmore was appointed to Salem by the Conference 
held at Bath, Maine, June 29, 1822. He found here a 
class of twenty-five members, in charge of Timothy Mer- 
ritt, then stationed at Wood End, Lynn. The names of 
twenty are recorded as retained on trial or in full. The 
class met at Samuel Fenby's, in an up-stairs tenement, 
on the corner of Essex and Washington Sts., now occu- 
pied by the Price Block ; then at Sarah Doak's on Norman 
street, near Crombie ; an old house, which from the location 
and description must have been the same which Eleanor 
Putnam describes in " Old Salem " as the shop of " Mrs. 
Birmingham." 

Fillmore states that every member was poor ; six were 
servant girls, three, poor widows and the few that had fam- 
ilies, poor. 

He boarded with Fenby and Berry, and then outside the 
pale. Fillmore was well received by prominent people 
outside the church whom he names, and also by the Salem 
pastors, some of whom preached for him. His first preach- 
ing service was held July 22, over a wheelwright's shop 
on Federal street, and for several months after, in the 
Town Hall ; then in a small hall on Sewall street over a 
tinshop. The congregations numbered from fifty to 
seventy-five. Collections for all purposes, for the first 
year $179.64. 

It is important to set forth fully the work of Jesse Fill- 
more in Salem, because his pastorate had a controlling in- 
fluence on its Methodism and set back its progress more 
than a quarter of a century. The period of his ministry 
is still a factor in the opinion of Salem Methodism held by 
those who do not understand its history, especially among 



A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 279 

the ministers of our Conference. It is due to Jesse Fill- 
more that the facts and circumstances of his work be plainly 
written out that his honor and integrity as a Christian man 
and minister may be vindicated. The following plaintive 
sentence is from a letter written in his latest days. " I 
have done nothing in all my life to forfeit the esteem of 
any man." I do not think you ever did, Jesse Fillmore. 
Your errors were of judgment, and in the positiveness of 
your nature, you seem to have been an honest man. 

It is also a duty to show the justification of the course 
pursued by the Methodist church of Fillmore's time in 
Salem. 

Fillmore came to Salem well recommended and well 
known. He had served the church in New Bedford as 
its first pastor ; also at Marblehead, and had preached ac- 
ceptably in Salem before he was stationed here. He 
found favor and succeeded in his work. Souls were saved ; 
a continuous revival ensued. The work begun in his 
charge extended throughout the town, and it is recorded 
in 1826, that, during the two previous years, three hun- 
dred and seven persons had been received into five Salem 
churches, of whom one hundred and seventeen were heads 
of families. Fillmore's own flock increased and many, con- 
verted at his meetings, became members of other churches. 
Nothing, during all the years of his stay in Salem, is 
written or appears that reflects on his character. In the 
several investigations made, Fillmore is sustained. He 
was not a money lover. His first year's salary was 1125.50 
and in no year was he paid $200. 

But Fillmore was not a practical man. He treated his 
church as though they were children. He did not set 
them at work to strengthen the stakes and lengthen the 
cords of their tabernacle. His success and the rapid in- 
crease in his church membership led him to think that it 



280 A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 

had power to rank immediately with the older churches. 
He proceeded to make bricks without straw. He de- 
cided to build a church, though not a member of his flock 
had any means to aid him. 

Evidently, Samuel Berry did not sympathize with Fill- 
more's plans, for his name does not appear in the first list 
of trustees. 

Fillmore bought a lot of land on Sewall street, of A. 
Kneeland and wife, for $600, and built a church 40 J X 
60 J feet, which cost $4,000, but there is nothing to show 
that a dollar was ever paid on it or the land. Fillmore 
took everything in his own name, and became personally 
responsible for all pecuniary obligations. What a terrible 
mistake ! How blighting to the prospects of the enterprise ! 

He also was cheated, probably because he had no money. 
$2,000 was ample for that edifice at that time. It was ded- 
icated Feb. 11, 1824, and Daniel Fillmore, a godly man 
and brother of Jesse, preached the sermon. 

Fillmore's troubles began with the new church, but he 
never seemed to realize the cause. The trustees ought to 
have bought the lot of land. They could have paid for it 
in time, for under the incentive everybody would have 
helped a little. Even if they had been so foolish as to build 
immediately, they might have struggled out. They were 
citizens of Salem and would have had the sympathy and 
help of their fellow-citizens outside the church. They 
would have had the sense of responsibility which goes with 
an obligation, but the obligation and responsibility were 
not on them at all, but rested on Fillmore, not a citizen of 
Salem. The act of doing and taking all on himself was so 
irregular that it was natural for the feeling to become gen- 
eral in the town that he was crafty ; that he would not trust 
the church, and that, somehow, he would take care of him- 
self. 



A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 281 

If Fillmore had not built this church he would have left 
Salem at the end of his two years, respected and honored, 
and his successors would have seen continued prosperity. 

Evidently most of his church members believed in Fill- 
more, and expected that somehow the Lord would send 
relief through him, and when no such miracle was wrought 
they turned upon him, with the spirit of fierce despair. 

Fillmore remained in charge at Salem until 1825, when 
Epaphras Kibby was appointed to the circuit of Wood End, 
Lynn, Marblehead and Salem. Henry Mayo was appoint- 
ed to Marblehead and Salem in 1826, and Nathan B. 
Spaulding to the same circuit in 1827. In 1828, 1829 and 
1830 the charge was left to be supplied. Probably none 
of the above preached as Salem pastors, for Fillmore lo- 
cated and supplied the pulpit until the coming of N. S. 
Spaulding, in 1832. He controlled Methodism in Salem 
— controlled its administration, but a spirit of disorder 
ruled the people. What could a second pastor do with a 
crushed and broken-hearted band of poor, despised Meth- 
odists, who, notwithstanding their abuse of Fillmore, ad- 
hered to him because they thought that somehow he would 
gain liberty for himself and them. 

When Spaulding came, Fillmore had charge of the church 
under the presiding elder. He approached this residuary 
legatee of debt and proposed to buy the Fillmore plant. 
"The house was for sale for the debts." An investigation 
| showed the honest debts to be entirely out of the question, 
[and Fillmore consented to take $3600 in yearly payments 
of $1000, and the balance in three years. It was accepted. 
The trustees gave their official obligation. A disciplinary 
deed was recorded and Fillmore stepped aside, still per- 
sonally responsible. 

} Jefferson Hamilton was appointed to Salem in 1833, and 
C. S, McB-eading in 1834, but pastors and people were so 

EIIST. COLL. XXIV 18* 



282 A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 






handicapped with debt that little religious progress was 
made. At the end of 1835, under the pastorate of that 
blessed man, G. Pickering, who was appointed to Salem 
and Marblehead, the trustees had not paid a dollar on the 
debt, and had fallen behind $200 in interest, which Fill- 
more paid from his own earnings abroad. The grip of that 
debt was never relaxed from this unfortunate man, and, 
though he paid all he could upon it, there was a time 
when it exceeded $20,000. 

In 1835 Samuel Berry induced the trustees to publish a 
notice that the church would be closed and meetings held 
in Washington Hall, in a building where is the block now 
occupied by Mr. H. W. Thurston. Fillmore, then in/ 
Providence, came on. The people said they could not pay 
for the house and support a preacher too, and steadfastly 
refused to enter the church. The presiding elder sustained 
the people but the bishop decided against him and bade the 
pastor preach in the church or be removed. A portion of 
the people went to the hall with an English local preach- 
er not connected with the Conference, and Aaron Wait 
preached in the church, where the larger number remained. 

An investigation by Mudge, Sanborn, Pickering and 
Fiske decided that one minister be stationed at Salem, 
to preach in the church, but a scarcity of preachers and a 
chagrined presiding elder led to leaving Salem to be sup- 
plied that year. The report of members then was ninety- 
six. 

Pickering did not have a good time in Salem. He re- 
fused to preach in the hall and turned the charge over to 
Fillmore who preached until November, when J. W. 
Downing came, sometime after the Conference held that 
year in July, at Springfield. Downing influenced all but 
half a dozen of those who had gone to the hall to return, 
and Berry with them. The society increased in numbers, 



A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 283 

and the trustees made another effort to grapple with Fill- 
more's debt, by the sale of pews. Fillmore took several, 
and the notes to him were reduced one-half. The sum of 
$1,000, which tumbled in from somewhere, was assumed 
by Fillmore, though the house was held as collateral. 

Dissension soon arose again. The income from pews 
sold was lost. The people paid in very little and when, 
in 1838, Stephen Gr. Hyler was appointed to Salem, ev- 
erything was behind. The preacher's board was not paid, 
Fillmore was sued for it, but gained the case. These 
were consequential damages not allowed, though, I doubt 
not, Fillmore would have paid them if he had had the 
money. 

But Hyler married a good wife in Salem, Micklefield by 
name, whose father was one of the English Methodists who 
had to report at the U. S. Marshal's office in 1812. 

When A. D. Sargent came to the circuit of Wood End, 
Lynn and Salem, in 1839, the stewards of the Sewall Street 
Church would do nothing about supplying the pulpit, and 
the house was again closed. Fillmore came with Sargent 
but it was of no avail . 

At the following Quarterly Conference, changes were 
made in the boards of stewards and trustees, out of order 
and arbitrary certainly ; it was the desperate act of Fill- 
more, hounded by debt. This proud-spirited man might 
have found relief then, or years before, in bankruptcy. It 
would have been wise and justifiable, but his false sense 
of honor led him to prefer to owe a debt forever rather than 
cheat a creditor. 

The friendly board of stewards mended nothing. Mat- 
ters grew worse. Fillmore was preaching in Pembroke. 

Bradley, a local preacher from Boston, supplied Salem. 
The disaffected members, headed by Berry, Pike and An- 
drews attempted to organize an independent Methodist 



284 A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 

church. They met a few Sundays in Lyceum Hall, when 
the scheme fell through. 

In the spring of 1840, before Conference, some trans- 
ferred their membership to Marblehead, and held meet- 
ings in a small room on Derby street as a branch of that 
church. All this was rebellious, but under God, it cut 
the meshes of the net in which Methodism in Salem had 
been hopelessly entangled for fifteen years. If the people 
had followed Berry's advice they would have escaped years 
before ; and here appears full justification of the conduct 
of the Methodist people of Salem, in that disastrous time. 

I have said that Fillmore had a controlling influence on 
the Methodist church in Salem. From the beginning he 
commanded the people and decided how everything should 
be done. He built the church, made all the contracts and 
negotiated all arrangements on his own uncounselled judg- 
ment. He had not even a wife to advise him. He was 
too much centralized within himself to fall under the sav- 
ing influence of a woman's love. If he had been married, 
the intuitive sense of the distaff might have saved him from 
his woful mistakes in judgment. We blame women for 
much, but there is no woman in this case. If there had 
been, Salem might now be the centre of Essex County 
Methodism. 

Fillmore was captain of the ship. He overloaded her. 
She was waterlogged and dismasted in the storm, and 
bound to break in pieces on the rocks right ahead. The 
commander was drunk with his mad conceit. The crew 
had done their best ; but now, when they saw certain de- 
struction ahead, they escaped with their lives, and they 
did right. They took nothing from the ship, no chest, 
not even a boat. They plunged into the angry sea and 
swam ashore. Everything was lost, including twenty 
years of time. 



A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 285 

Why did they not control Fillmore and refuse to let him 
build the church in 1824? 

They were poor and inexperienced people — laborers 
and servants. Can you expect those whose ideas are lim- 
ited to the capacity of their daily toil to forecast the future, 
or deal with questions which demand the widest com- 
prehension ? Yet they were the very same sort of people 
who, at Lynn, Marblehead and elsewhere, appeared as the 
first fruits of New England Methodism. If the founda- 
tions of the work had been built on their simple ideas, it 
would have grown in Salem as elsewhere. 

Fillmore held on at Sewall Street and preached until 
1845, unrecognized by presiding elder or conference. 
Negotiations were had with the new society and its pas- 
tors, and partial agreements were entered into, as to the 
disposal of the property in Sewall street, but the fear of 
debt prevented all conclusions. Fillmore became odious 
to the children of those whose Christian lives had been so 
grievous, and aversion towards him filled all the Methodist 
people. What a pitiful life he led, dragging the chain 
of his great mistake forever ! He moved to Providence, 
but under his charter from the legislature, which author- 
ized the election of trustees for life, continued his organ- 
ization, called his annual trustee meetings in Salem and 
kept his records, until he sold the property in 1871. He 
struggled, personally, to pay the old debt and paid $1,000 
in 1864, but when he died he was still in debt on that 
meeting-house. 

I noticed him in Salem, long before I knew who he was. 
He was a man to attract attention, one whom you would 
turn about to look at after he had passed. His figure, 
tall, spare and erect, was clad in well-brushed garments of 
faded black, and a tall, black hat of a pattern old. His 
gait was peculiar ; it was decisive ; he set down his feet 



286 A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 

step by step as if conscious that he must keep something 
under. His face was noticeable. Of the rugged, Andrew 
Jackson type, smoothly shaven, set with stiff lines, yet 
unlike any other face of that mold I ever saw, was 
tinged with auburn blood, and so deeply freckled as to 
appear a yellowish brown, a shade lighter than his thick, 
sandy hair which never turned gray. Out of this mask, 
the glance of his gray eyes was sure to fall upon you. 
They seemed to look at everything but noticed nothing. 
They had grown weary with watching for what never came 
and were looking now into the past. I never saw that 
face kindle with emotion, or those eyes flash. Wretched 
old man ! Who that knew him cannot forgive and pity 
him. We may regret his lack of judgment but let us 
commend him for what he would have done if he had 
known how. If Hawthorne could have focussed him, he 
might have found in Fillmore, the subject of as thrilling 
a tale as the " Scarlet Letter." He might have followed 
him beyond the grave and described his perturbed spirit 
walking still the streets of our city, trying to make his 
figures come right and gather up those misspent years. 
But we will leave him with God, whose tender love is now, 
we trust, his comfort in heaven. Since this article was 
written, I have been glad to learn that in his old age a 
woman did consent to marry him. A woman's love is 
wondrous pitiful. 

The history of Salem Methodism in all the books ex- 
cept Felt's Annals begins in 1841. It is written in " The 
Pied Piper :" 

" But when they saw 'twas a lost endeavor, 
And Piper and dancers were gone forever, 
They made a decree, that lawyers never 
Should think their records dated duly, 
If, after the day of the month and year, 
These words did not, as well, appear: 



A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 287 

'And so long after what happened here, 
On the twenty-second of July, 
Thirteen hundred and seventy-six;' 
And the better in memory to fix 
The place of the children's last retreat, 
They called it the Pied Piper's Street. 

They wrote the story on a column 
And on the great church window painted 
The same, to make the world acquainted 
How the children were stolen away, 
And there it stands to this very day." 

The application of this quotation appears in the histor- 
ical date as 1841, and in the de facto existence of a live 
Methodist church in the old edifice on Sewall street. 

N. S. Spaulding, who came from Gloucester where he 
seems to have gone from conference, found the little com- 
pany on Derby street — thirty determined Methodists in 
charge of Samuel Berry — and organized them into a church. 
In 1842, the number of members had increased to eighty; 
in 1843, Brother Merrill reported one hundred. These 
were the results of a gracious revival under Spaulding. 
There are no man worshippers among Salem Methodists, 
but the memory of Spaulding, after the lapse of half a 
century, is sweet to those living, who were converted un- 
der his pastorate, and to the children of those who have 
gone to heaven. The people had a mind to work with 
that godly man, and a new church on Union street was 
ready for dedication, Jan. 8, 1841. It was a plain, 
wooden structure, but larger and better than the old 
church and cost only half as much. The dedicatory ser- 
vices (sermon by Daniel Wise, D.D.) are referred to in 
"Zion's Herald" of Jan. 27 ; there are also interesting ref- 
erences to this society Jan. 17 and 24, 1842. "Zion's 
Herald " has the material to complete this history. 

Within a year from the dedication one hundred were 
added to the church. The congregations filled the house. 



288 A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 






The successors of Spaulding, Joseph A. and D. K. 
Merrill, Horace Moulton, P. Crandall and David Wins- 
low had years of peace and progress. Winslow says, 
June 26, 1846, "The past six months have been to us times 
of refreshing from the presence of the Lord. Twenty- 
nine have joined on probation." 

The church soon worked the ground within the scope 
of its location and reached a condition of growth that de- 
manded a wider field. 

As we look back, it seems a day of small things, and 
the little church on Union street a mere speck of influence 
in an out-of-the-way place. Poor and despised, you say, 
but please remember the twenty years of agony. It had 
done the best it could and the only thing under the cir- 
cumstances to be done ; but strength had come, and from 
1848 to 1851 a restless feeling prevailed. The older 
members, including Samuel Berry, wanted to " let well 
enough alone." They could not forget those dreadful 
years. The new converts, many of them young and 
enterprising people, desired to move out and build 
again. 

The Naumkeag steam cotton mills, in South Salem, 
completed in 1847, employed American help, country girls 
from Christian homes, who found another home in Salem 
Methodism. Some of the overseers were Methodists. 
They all agitated the question of a new church. 

In 1849 the charge was left to be supplied. J. W. 
Perkins came in 1850 and a precious revival prepared the 
way for the greater work of Luman Boyden which began 
in 1851. It is proper to note here, that very many who 
were converted at Union street did notremain in that church. 
In the unsettled years of '47 to '51 it was an easy matter 
for a small dissatisfaction to influence individuals and fam- 
ilies to leave that humble people and place of worship for 



A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 289 

the finer churches and higher society of the town. If 
Methodism had retained all her converts in Salem her 
progress would have been a mighty one. 

Luman Boyden quaintly says, in his account of his Salem 
ministry, written in 1870, " When my name was read for 
Salem that was altogether unexpected. I was not acquainted 
with a person in that city. Previous information concern- 
ing Methodism in Salem had given me (and many others) 
the impression that it was somewhat of an undesirable ap- 
pointment." (The difficulties connected with the Sewall 
Street Church had often been discussed in conference. 
How far that shadow falls !) "While I was gathering up 
my books and papers after conference closed (being one 
of the secretaries) a brother came to me and said f you will 
be obliged to build a church the first thing you do.' An- 
other added, ? unless a church is built this year several 
have decided to leave the society.' My worthy predeces- 
sor confirmed this, but spoke highly of the society who 
were, with one exception, in favor of building in a special 
locality. The objector was an aged brother, extensively 
acquainted in Salem and of considerable influence. He 
had a strong will and, when he had taken a stand, seldom 
yielded." There you are again, Samuel Berry ! God be 
praised for that iron will ! It did good service for Salem 
Methodism and gave it new life in 1841. Boyden goes 
on, "I began to think a mistake had been made and ques- 
tioned the presiding elders with no satisfaction. I told 
the Bishop I thought he had made one great mistake but 
he replied, ? I believe in one year you will think differ- 
ently.' A visit to Salem, on his way from conference, 
comforted him in the warm greeting he received from the 
people. The first Sunday, May 4, did more. He met 
large congregations and a fine Sunday School. He says, 
"I was specially anxious to learn the peculiarities of the 

HIST. COLL. XXIV 19 



290 A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 

church ill the prayer-meeting. I found, in the evening, 
evidence of zeal, and, I thought, more than a usual amount 
of talent, and the Lord was with us." 

Ah ! Luman Boy den, God giveth talent to those who 
stand the years of trial in his service. 

Boyden was a pastor as well as preacher, and hastened 
to visit the people. He soon found that a new church was 
needed ; it ought to be built on the corner of Lafayette and 
Harbor streets ; the church was united and spoke well of 
former pastors ; they were ready to labor for the salvation 
of souls, but their pecuniary condition was such that un- 
less the Lord opened the way no house of worship could 
be built, however much desired or needed. 

Alas ! Methodism in Salem had had an experience which 
had shaken the money out of it, and none had dared to 
enter up to this time. 

The first board meeting, held May 12, was a peaceful 
season, and the principal discussion that of building a 
church. Samuel Berry pleasantly opposed and spoke of 
a debt on the chapel with the interest due thereon for two 
years, amounting in all to $700. If they would raise 
this money he would talk about building a church. They 
tried to raise it and failed. 

The first quarterly conference closed with no better re- 
sults. In fact, Berry there flatly said, "It you build a church 
in South Fields, I will not give a dollar for it and neither 
myself nor my family will attend there. I know better 
places to build a church." Eight again, Samuel Berry ! 

A committee, shrewdly suggested by Boyden, was ap- 
pointed, including Berry, to look up locations. The old 
man put his foot in it when he consented to act on this 
committee, for it tacitly committed him to building a church 
somewhere, which he never intended to do. He meant to 
control the events which in the end controlled him. 



A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 291 

While the committee on locations was allowed time to 
select the best lot, another important investigation was in 
progress, viz., where the funds could be raised to build a 
church anywhere. Abraham Bennett, head overseer at 
the Naumkeag Mills, a member of the church, invited 
Boy den to visit Smith, the agent, and he said to Boy den, 
"If you will build a church on the corner of Lafayette and 
Harbor streets , I will contribute $500, and loan you $5,000. 
I will buy two of the best pews and probably, part of the 
time will attend church there. Some of my overseers do 
not go to meeting because they cannot afford to pay pew 
rent. They can sit in my pews." 

This interview settled the questions of the location and 
the church. Several board meetings were held with no 
results as to influencing Samuel Berry. At last Boyden 
issued a call for a church meeting on important business, 
without other explanation. When Samuel Berry heard of 
it he had a stormy, private interview with his pastor. 
Boyden revealed the purpose of the meeting, which was, 
to have a secret ballot, without discussion on the subject, 
yes or no. He sweetly argued his case and in the midst 
of Berry's opposition, offered to give up the meeting, say- 
ing, "Father Berry, if we are not united, we can do noth- 
ing." 

Berry yielded and arose in the meeting and said, "Breth- 
ren and sisters, you know that I have been opposed to 
building a new church. [Sensation.] I have already helped 
to build two Methodist churches in this city" (this con- 
firms the loss of his chist when he left the wreck) , "and I 
am now an old man. If you build where the majority de- 
sire, it will greatly increase the distance from my house, 
and you know I have been decidedly opposed to the build- 
ing of a church on Lafayette street [great sensation] but 
the statement you have heard from our pastor, and the 



292 A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 

records of our meetings read by our secretary are correct, 
and I am convinced that if we build a new church we must 
be united, and I shall vote to build on Lafayette street." 
[Joyous commotion.] 

The lot was bought of David Pingree, president of the 
Cotton Co. for $2,500, less a subscription of $250. The 
plans, by Graves of Boston, were submitted to Salem 
builders, resulting in responses at $4,000, $4,500, $5,000 
and $5,500. Upon consulting with his brother builders the 
$4,000 man backed out. Boy den says "midnight darkness 
veiled the countenances of the committee" (the people 
were building this church). They were about to vote to 
accept the contract for $4,500, as the only thing to do, 
when Boy den's excellent judgment suggested that the pro- 
posals be again offered, to include outside contractors, 
which resulted in a proposition from Gibson and Rand 
(residence not given) , to build the church for $3,750 (bear 
in mind the cost of the church of 1824) which was ac- 
cepted. 

The corner stone was laid May 12, 1852, with the usual 
ceremonies, and a tin box containing current historical mat- 
ter deposited therein. 

The people raised all the money they possibly could 
among themselves and importuned everybody else. That 
was right ! The women did bravely and undertook to 
furnish the house. Boy den gives quite a long and inter- 
esting account of their efforts among the storekeepers, and 
also the result of their fair held in the Town Hall, from 
which they realized over $500. This fair had no lottery 
schemes and its success was a surprise to the city. Boyden 
says "When the report was published in the papers, doubt- 
less many thought they had formed a wrong opinion of the 
Methodists." 

The Lafayette Street Church was completed in January, 






A HISTOEY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 293 

1853. The society enjoyed a glorious revival in the in- 
terim, at Union street. Before it began, however, Boy- 
clen explains how he remedied a serious defect in the con- 
duct of the social meetings, namely, the custom of making 
long prayers and exhortations, which had probably grown 
up amid the discussions about building in '48 and '49. He 
preached a plain sermon on the subject which offended 
some, but at the following evening meeting Samuel Berry 
approved the sermon, and a change in the habit resulted 
in largely increased congregations. People had to come 
long before the time of service to obtain seats. Dr. Ly- 
man Beecher, who for some time preached in the Howard 
Street Church in Salem, stated in a public meeting in Bos- 
ton, that he stepped into the Methodist chapel in Salem 
after his meeting had closed. "It was crowded; God 
was doing a great work there and the minister was in 
clover." 

Luman Boyden closes his account of the revival, as fol- 
lows : "Among the members baptized and admitted to 
the church was my only beloved son who is now glorified 
with unnumbered millions in heaven." 

The other churches in Salem felt the influence of this 
revival and for the first time proposed union meetings. 
These meetings were held, and also, for the first time, 
proposals for exchanges were received from other pastors 
which caused the Methodist people to realize that they 
were not, after all, poor and despised as they had hereto- 
fore felt. The writer never had any unity with this feeling, 
but cannot say but he might have called himself a worm 
of the dust, if he had lived and worshipped with the Meth- 
odists in Salem from 1824 to 1832. 

It was a great day for Salem Methodism, Jan. 6, 1853, 
when the Lafayette Street Church was dedicated. The 
house was thronged with the very best people of the city 



294 A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 

and Bishop Baker preached the sermon. Two stores were 
finished under the church and let for $500 per annum. 
When Boyden left in April, 1853, the receipts for pews 
were $250 per quarter. The idea was to reduce the debt 
of $5,000, $500 annually from these proceeds. 

It was my privilege to listen to Boyden's farewell ser- 
mon, — the first sermon I heard in Salem. 

A. D. Merrill followed Luman Boyden in 1853. My 
impressions of him were that he did not prosper in his 
charge. 

Daniel Richards came in 1854. He brought his beauti- 
ful, young wife with him. She was a help and comfort 
to the people. She organized our Mutual Aid Society, 
which has done aud continues to do good service. Rich- 
ards was a good preacher then as he is now, and though 
he had no special revival, two young men came into the 
church during his pastorate, who were destined to have 
much to do with its work in Salem. There were other 
converts who have honored Methodism : P. W. Peter- 
sou, now a preacher in the Wisconsin conference, also 
Augustine Caldwell, formerly of this conference. 

Richards did much good and through his influence the 
annual conference met in Salem in 1856. The people of 
all denominations had a great time entertaining the minis- 
ters. Doctor Butler went from that conference as a mis- 
sionary to India. 

J. A. Adams, stationed in 1856, remained one year. He 
seemed very much discouraged at the condition of affairs, 
and thought the church was going to ruin. 

A. F. Herrick, in 1857 and '58, had two good years. He 
was a lovable Christian minister, very popular with the 
young people as well as others, an acceptable preacher and 
pastor. There was a good revival and many accessions 
were made to the church. During his pastorate, the loan 



A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 295 

from Smith, reduced to $4,000, was transferred to the Salem 
Five Cents Savings Bank. 

John H. Mansfield did an excellent work in 1859 and 
1860. The church, under him, enjoyed an important revi- 
val during which almost the entire, large choir were con- 
verted, and many others. The Sunday evening meetings 
were transferred from the vestry to the church which was 
always filled while he remained. Mrs. Mansfield, an intel- 
lectual, godly woman was of much service in the society. 

When E. A. Manning came to Salem he was not known 
to us, but was warmly recommended by Mansfield. He 
came in a dark hour. Lincoln had just entered upon his 
first administration. The nation was in the preliminary 
throes of civil war. A majority of the southern states had 
seceded and organized a confederacy. The federal gov- 
ernment was defied and preparations were being made to 
bombard Fort Sumpter. That first of April, 1861, was 
the beginning of the demoralization preceding the strife, 
more dreadful than the war itself. Business was dead, 
men were out of employment, and the country waited in 
suspense, not knowing what to do or think. 

Manning, in preaching his first sermon, said, among other 
reassuring things, that he expected the year might be one 
of disaster " but if it comes to the worst I will share the 
lot of this people, and when our resources fail we will go 
together and dig clams for food." 

The membership of the church had changed greatly since 
1853. The influx of foreign labor had largely supplanted 
American female help in the mills, while a new management 
had changed the overseers. This explains what Samuel 
Berry meant in 1851, when he declared that there were 
better locations for the church than the corner of Lafayette 
and Harbor streets. Doubtless nothing better could have 
been done in 1851, but a church is built to stand forever 



296 A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 

and you cannot depend upon a cotton mill to sustain a 
church. This location was on the southern border of the 
city and except for the mills had no natural feeders. South 
of it was mostly an open country. Few of the members 
lived within half a mile of the church, and most of them 
much farther away. Samuel Berry moved his home that 
he might enjoy the meetings, but died before it was ready 
for him. 

It was an effort to attend this church from every part 
of the city. Its location was not convenient of access in 
comparison with any other Salem church, save for the 
mills and a few who lived in South Salem. But for the 
building up of that section since 1872 it would now be is- 
olated. As that part of the city is to continue growing, 
the church will always do a good work. 

Gershom F. Cox was appointed in 1862. The elastic na- 
tion had begun to adjust itself to the condition of internal 
war. The policy of the government was defined and a 
spirit of desperate endurance pervaded the public mind. 
Nevertheless, the depleted communities felt the loss of the 
men who had gone to fight. The churches also felt it. But 
Cox found other matters demanding serious and immediate 
attention. The society had suffered through poor manage- 
ment for ten years. The older members, who struggled 
with Boyden, were unwilling that young men should share 
in the guidance of its affairs, and they had drifted out of 
a successful course. The balances due at the close of minis- 
tries had not been met, but extended by loans until a float- 
ing debt had reached a point beyond which was bank- 
ruptcy. Cox made a thorough investigation and proposed 
a remedy which included a new management. He induced 
the members of the newly organized official board to as-. 
siune the debt as individuals, and later, after exhausting 
the proceeds of a fair, he persuaded each person to pay 



A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 297 

the balance of what he had assumed, and so the debt was 
blotted out. It seems to us that it disappeared as if by 
magic. New plans for meeting current expenses led to a 
new order of things, and the church in Salem dates another 
epoch from the ministry of Gershom F. Cox. His idea 
was to manage the finances of the church as the business 
of the world is done — settle the accounts of each year in 
full at the close of the year. 

The ministry of Loranus Crowell, D.D., for three years 
from 1864 was a marked success. Everybody loved him. 
His family was a blessing to the people. He enjoyed his 
pastorate. Members were constantly added to the church, 
and during his pastorate the church at Beverly was organ- 
ized from the loins of the Lafayette Street society. Crow- 
ell became very popular in the city and was elected a 
member of the school committee. 

S. F. Chase followed Crowell and was pastor for two 
years. 

Daniel Dorchester, D. D., was appointed in 1869 and re- 
mained three years. Under his pastorate the church at- 
tained the strongest position in her history. He was a 
popular preacher and a far-seeing manager. There were 
accessions to the church by conversions and by letter. The 
congregations were large. Dr. Dorchester received the 
largest salary ever paid by the church, which was raised 
easily, for the right man was in the right place. 

During this prosperity the conviction came upon the 
church that Methodism had never had a fair chance in Sa- 
lem, and something ought to be clone to give it play. La- 
fayette Street Church was well enough and would always 
exert a powerful influence, but another enterprise must be 
started in a central location. After investigation the lo- 
cation of the old church in Sewall street was found to be 
the centre of population. 

HIST. COLL. XXIV 19* 



298 A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 

Ah ! Jesse Fillmore, if the Lord had only given you 
wisdom to plan your enterprise as wisely as you selected 
your location, this history would be illuminated like " ap- 
ples of gold in pictures of silver." 

That spot and the contiguous location upon North street, 
about to be utilized for a beautiful, new Methodist church 
is the aorta of Salem. The group of streets within two 
hundred feet of it are thoroughfares through which one- 
half the population passes to reach the depot, and the busi- 
ness portion of the town, and through which the other half 
must pass in the common intercourse of society. 

The old Sewall street church, with all the rights and 
privileges under Fillmore's iron-clad act of legislature was 
purchased of him by the descendants and successors of 
those who swam ashore from the drifting wreck in 1840. 

The Lord shall comfort Zion, her places waste restore, 
And of her silent wilderness, make Eden bloom once more. 
His garden she shall then become and worthy of his choice, 
Gladness and thanks in all her smiles and music in her voice. 

Salem Methodism intended to be conservative in the 
new enterprise and proposed only to establish a Sunday 
school and chapel in connection with the pastorate at Lafay- 
ette street, but the interposition of Providence changed the 
plan and a church was at once organized. Thirty-five mem- 
bers of the home society were sent forth to colonize the 
new location. They were, indeed, of the very best and 
most influential members of the church which sent them 
forth, following them with its sympathy, prayers and ma- 
terial aid as they went to reestablish Methodism in her 
ancient seat. It was a sundering of tender ties, a going 
forth of those whose years from youth to middle age had 
been given to the cause of God in the mother church. 

The closing: memoranda of Methodism in Salem will 
have interlocking connections. 






A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 299 

Among other to-be-remembered things accomplished un- 
der Dorchester's pastorate was an arrangement he made 
to pay the debt on the Lafayette Street Church, which 
would have been fully carried out but for the funds re- 
quired to inaugurate the new enterprise. 

Rev. Joshua Gill was the first pastor at Sewall street. 
A revival began, the work grew, and a successful Sunday 
school progressed under Matthew Robson, who had proved 
the ablest superintendent ever in charge at the mother 
church. 

J. S. Whedon's pastorate at Lafayette Street was a 
marked success. His able sermons were attributed to his 
father. The young man relished the joke. A revival con- 
tinued during the pastorate resulting in large accessions. 
The church was also enlarged, remodelled and refurnished, 
including anew organ, at a total cost of more than $9,000. 
A fair held at the time under the management of Mr. Cox, 
who lived and died in Salem, netted $2,000. It was opened 
and closed with prayer. [No lotteries.] 

Rev. George L. Collyer at Lafayette Street for three 
years from 1875 to 1877 inclusive, was a successful and 
popular minister. Large attendance and revival interest. 
The thank-offering system introduced at this time was very 
popular and successful. 

Rev. Daniel Steele, D.D., the ripe scholar and man of 
God, did a work in Salem which no preceding pastor had 
done. He taught the people the wonderful and beautiful 
things of the gospel, the rich culture of religion. There 
were many conversions during his pastorate. Though a 
sick man for part of the last year, he did a work which 
still has an influence. During Dr. Steele's pastorate, an- 
other change in the management of the Naumkeag Mills, 
and the hard times of those years, caused a loss to the 
church of over forty families. 



300 A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM, 






George W. Mansfield followed Dr. Steele in 1880. He 
entered with great zeal upon the work. There were con- 
versions, and some of the present influential members of 
the church were among the number. Mansfield retired by 
reason of nervous prostration near the close of his second 
year. He proposed that the church receive a new pastor 
from the conference of '82, but the society preferred to 1 
supply the pulpit. He was unable to resume his duties 
and Rev. C. L. Eastman was engaged in September to 
finish the year. 

During the absence of Mansfield the people determined 
to pay the debt of $7,000 on the church. Pledges amount- 
ing to nearly $6,000 were obtained, strictly within the 
church and congregation. The balance was assumed by 
the Sunday school and the Mutual Aid Society. The 
money was all paid except $400 within two years, and a 
jubilee held to which all former pastors were invited. 

The pastorate of W. P. Ray began in 1883 and closed 
in 1885. 

S. L. Gracey, D.D., is the present popular and success- 
ful pastor in his second year. 

The pastorates of W. J. Hambleton, W. H. Meredith, 
Charles F. Rice and W. P. Odell in Wesley Chapel, now 
Wesley Church, were happy, and seasons of great spiritual 
prosperity and material growth. The brief struggle of the 
early days has long been over. There is no more popular 
church in our city and its condition may be noted from 
the following recently-published item. 

Wesley Church is very prosperous. In the last three 
months it has received into church relations 24, and in the 
same period 40 have been added to the Sunday school, 
19 in the last month. Both church and Sunday school 
were never so large as now. The church has some 350 
members, and the Sunday school 375. Large congrega- 
tions attend the church services. The choir is to be reor- 



A HISTORY OF METHODISM IN SALEM. 301 

ofanized and enlarged to the number of 25 under the clirec- 
tion of Mr. George Robie, the present chorister, and a 
new book introduced for use in the praise services only. 
The new church structure will be begun early in spring. 
It is to be of brick with terra cotta trimmings. 

Rev. T. W. Bishop is the present popular pastor in his 
second year. 

The mother church closely approaches her offspring in 
membership, and in some respects is stronger. 

Salem has always been a conservative city and of slow 
growth. Population in 1776, 5,337 ; 1790, 7,421 ; 1820, 
12,730; 1840, 15,082; 1850, 18,000, with about 30,000 
at present. Methodism has gained, since 1840, 700 per 
cent on its membership in 1843, and in the same ratio on 
the population. Methodism is in the front rank of the 
Protestant denominations of the city in influence and mem- 
bership. 

Conversions in the Methodist church in Salem have been 
many and continuous, and exceed 3,000 since 1843 ; her 
membership represents a sincere and progressive body of 
Christian people, and includes men by no means behind 
their associates in the principal departments of business 
and social position. They are among the leaders as mer- 
chants, manufacturers and artisans. 

Salem has begun to realize her importance as a central 
distributing and radiating point, and when she becomes a 
large city, as she surely will, Methodism may be reckoned 
as no mean factor in stimulating her growth. 

The writer has satisfied himself, and tried to record that 
the work begun by Jesse Lee in 1790 joins that of 1887 
and the fabric is without a seam. 



GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY OF MANCHESTER, 

MASS., FROM THE EARLIEST SETTLEMENT TO 

THE YEAR 1886. 



BY JOHN PRICE. 



( Continued from page 240.) 

40 Azariah 5 (Azariah? Jonathan? Samuel,' 2 Wil- 
liam 1 ) baptized May 24, 1741 ; married Sarah Leach, 
published Dec. 27, 1760. She was born — , 1737, d. Apr. 

18, 1831, aged 94. He was lost at sea with Captain Col- 
Ion, 1777. 

Children : 

i Sarah, b. Dec. 26, 1761 ; m. Samuel Quimby of Essex. 
ii Azariah, b. May 12, 1763. 

iii Patty, b. June 8, 1765; m. JohnAyres, Oct., 1787; d. Apr. 14, 
1849, se. 83. 

56 iv Abner, b. Oct. 9, 1767. 

v Lydia, b. — , 1769; m. Thomas Low, Aug. 19, 1792; d. Dec. 

28, 1853, se. 84. 
vi Molly, b. Sept. 20, 1771; d. July 8, 1856, se. 85, uum. 

57 vii Richard, b. Apr. 8, 1774. 

58 viii John, b. Jan. 1, 1776. 

ix Isaac, b. Nov. 17, 1777 ; d. Jan. 5, 1803, at sea. 

41 Malachi 5 (Malachi? Jonathan? Samuel? Wil- 
liam 1 ) born Mar. 10, 1740-1 ; married Kuth Edwards, 
Jan. 12, 1762. She was born Jan. 22, 1740-1 ; d. Sept. 

19, 1823, as. 83. He died Dec. 9, 1829, se. 89. 
Children, (all born in Manchester) : 

i Malachi, bapt. Oct. 31, 1762; d. Nov. 16, 1762. 
ii Malachi, b. Mar. 4, 1764; d. June 17, 1787, at sea. 

59 iii Aaron, b. Aug. 28, 1765. 

60 iv William, b. Dec. 3, 1766. 

v Ruth, b. July 25, 1769; m. Thomas Lee, Apr. 21, 1791. 
vi Priscilla, b. Oct. 5, 1772 ; m. David Crafts, Nov. 29, 1792. 
vii Anne, b. May 4, 1775 ; m. Joseph Day, Aug. 12, 1798. 
(302) 



GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 303 

viii Lucy, bapt. Nov. 5, 1776 ; d. Sept. 12, 1777. 
61 ix Simeon, b. Dec. 27, 1778. 

x Daniel, b. June 17, 1781 ; d. Feb. 9, 1783. 

xi Lucy, b. Apr. 28, 1783; d. Nov. 21, 1850; unm. 

42 Jacob 5 {Jacob? Jonathan? Samuel? William 1 ) 
born Apr. 23, 1749 ; married Elizabeth Norton, May 3, 
1772. She was born Apr. 27, 1750. 

Children : 

i Elizabeth, b. Aug. 24, 1772 ; m. George Martin, June 16, 1797. 

ii Annis, b. May 3, 1774; d. Sept. 24, 1775. 

iii Annis, b. Jan. 12, 1776; m. Daniel Low, Aug. 19, 1792. 

iv Jacob, b. Aug. 4, 1777; d. Aug. 21, 1777. 

v Patty, b. Apr. 6, 1779 ; cl. Sept. 16, 1844. 

vi Jacob, b. Apr. 7, 1781; m. Polly Batchelder, Aug. 3, 1807; 
d. Aug. 1, 1812. 

Jacob 5 was lost at sea in 1780. 

43 Isaac 5 (Jacob? Jonathan? Samuel? William 1 ) 
born Feb. 6, 1758 ; married Eebecca Tewksbury, Mar. 
30, 1779. She was born Oct. 6, 1758; died Sept. 10, 
1807. He died Sept. 26, 1841, aged 84. 

Children : 

i Rebecca, b. Feb. 24, 1780; m. Wm. Tuck, Apr. 28, 1805. 

ii Sarah, b. Oct. 16, 1781; m. John Woodbury of Lynn, Sept. 

14, 1802; d. May 6, 1835. 
iii Elizabeth, b. Oct. 14, 1783; m. Seth Dodge, Sept. 10, 1810. 
iv Annis, b. Dec. 25, 1785; m. Isaac Galloup of Beverly, Oct 4, 

1807; d. Nov. 23, 1844. 
v Isaac, b. Peb. 28, 1788; d. March 9, 1790. 
62 vi Jacob, b. Aug. 20, 1789 ; m. Lucy G. Galloup, Jan. 29, 1809 ; 

d. Aug. 2, 1852. 
vii Amos, b. Aug. 18, 1792; d. Aug. 19, 1795. 
viii Lucy, b. Apr. 28, 1795; d. June 1, 1797. 
ix Lucy, b. June 27, 1797; m. James Austin, Nov. 26, 1829. 

He married, second, Mary Foster, widow of Thomas 
Wells, Jan. 12, 1808. She died Feb. 1, 1843, a>. 82. s. p. 

44 Deacon Nathan 5 (Jacob? Jonathan? Samuel? 
William 1 ) born July 25, 1768 ; married Elizabeth Perry, 



304 GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 

July 5, 1792. She was born November 10, 1768; died 
Feb. 26, 1856, ae. 77. He died July 21, 1837. 
Children : 

63 i Nathan, b. Jan. 13, 1794. 

64 ii John P., b. Apr. 12, 1795. 

65 iii Enoch, b. May 24, 1797. 

iv Mehitable, b. May 30, 1799; m. Daniel Allen, Dec. 23, 1824; 

2d husband, Joseph Allen, July 4, 1832. 
v Elizabeth, b. Feb. 28, 1801; m. John Peabody of Bradford, 

Jan. 14, 1840; d. Mar. 25, 1876. 
vi Foster, b. Apr. 26, 1803; m. Sally Dodge, Dec. 2,1824. 

They had no children. She d. May 24, 1838. He d. Mar. 

21, 1839. 
vii Mary, b. Oct. 6, 1806 ; m. Obed Carter, 2d, Nov. 17, 1825. 

No children. She died Aug. 7, 1876. 
viii Jacob, b. Sept. 11, 1808; m. Hannah Marsters, Nov. 17, 1831. 

Had no children. Shed. Feb. 19, 1851. He d. Mar. 1, 1835. 
ix Naomi, b. Nov. 10, 1810; d. Nov. 18, 1810. 

66 x Israel, b. Aug. 14, 1812. 

Nathan was chosen Deacon before 1809, and served un- 
till his death, July 21, 1837. 

45 Nehemiah 5 (John, 4 Jonathan* Samuel, 2 Wil- 
liam 1 ) born Nov. 24, 1753 ; married Ruth Allen, Dec. 8, 
1774. She was born July 25, 1755. 

Children : 

i Nehemiah, b. Oct. 8, 1775. 

67 ii John, b. Feb. 14, 1777. 

iii Euth, b. June 13, 1779; m. John Cheever; 2d wife, April 13, 
1802; cl. Dec. 5, 1824. 

46 David 5 {John* Jonathan* Samuel, 2 William 1 ) 
born Feb. 10, 1755; married Elizabeth Edwards, Mar. 
6, 1777. She was born June 30, 1758; died Dec. 13, 
1832. He died May 15, 1794. 

Children : 

i Elizabeth, b. Jan. 6, 1778 ; m. Asa Richardson, May 29, 1809. 

68 ii David, b. June 8, 1780. 

iii Lydia, b. July 12, 1782; m. George Hall, Sept. 16, 1802. 

iv Nabby, b. Oct. 20, 1784; m. Joseph Godfrey of Boston. 

v John, bapt. Sept. 9, 1787; d. Sept. 29, 1789. 

vi Ruth, bapt. Sept. 15, 1794; m. Prescott Batchelder. 



GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 305 



SIXTH GENERATION. 

47 Ambrose 6 (Ambrose, 5 Samuel, 4 " Samuel, 3 Sam- 
uel, 2 William 1 ) born May 17, 1749 ; married Hannah 
Lee, Dec. 24, 1767. She was born Jan. 18, 1750. 

Children : 

i Ambrose, b. Oct. 25, 1768. 

ii Hannah, b. Aug. 17, 1770; m. Ezekiel Leach, June 24, 1793. 

48 Samuel 6 (Ambrose, 5 Samuel? Samuel, 3 Samuel? 
William 1 ) born Mar. 9, 1750 ; married Sarah Masterson 
about 1766. 

Children : 

69 i Nathaniel M., b. Nov. 3, 1767. 
ii Ruth, b.— ; d. Nov. 14, 1772. 
iii Benjamin, b. — . 

iv Samuel, b. — . 

49 William 6 (William, 5 Samuel? Samuel, 3 Samuel? 
William 1 ) born Dec. 3, 1752 ; married Anna Lee of 
Gloucester, published July 7, 1776. 

Children : 

i Anna, b. , 1777; d. , 1778. 

ii Anne, b. July 10, 1779 ; m. Sam'l Driver, Dec. 9, 1800. 

iii Polly, b. July 5, 1781 ; m. Daniel Appleton of Beverly, , 

1814. 
iv Nabby, bapt. July 20, 1783 ; m. Maloon of Salem. 

70 v Billy or Wm, b. Sept. 11, 1785. 

vi Charlotte, b. May 11, 1787; m. Humphrey Proctor, Jan. 25, 

1806. 
vii Susanna, b. Aug. 16, 1789; d. Mar. 8, 1792. 
viii Nabby, b. July 10, 1790; d. May 8, 1811. 

71 ix Thomas L., b. June 13, 1791. 

His first wife dying, he married, second, Sally Ed- 
wards, Mar. 29, 1795. She was born Jan. 21, 1767; 
died Oct. 15, 1827. He died Oct. 24, 1827. 

Children : 

x Mahala, b. June 19, 1796 ; d. Oct. 12, 1825. 

xi Woodbury, b. Oct. 11, 1802 ; m. Sally F. Tappan, Mar. 4, 1828. 

HIST. COLL. XXIV 20 



306 GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 

50 Capt. John 6 ( William, 5 Samuel,* Samuel? Sam- 
uel, 2 William 1 ) born Aug. 5, 1757 ; married Hannah Ed- 
wards, Nov. 22, 1779. She was born Nov. 13, 1762; 
died July 25, 1819. He died Oct. 20, 1822. 

Children, (all born in Manchester) : 

72 i John W., b. Aug. 5, 1781. 

ii Hannah, b. July 3, 1784; ra. Dea. Andrew Brown, Dec. 16, 
1804. She died Nov. 28, 1857, 3e. 73. 

73 iii James, b. Sept. 18, 1786. 

iv Nancy, b. Nov. 17, 1788; d. Mar. 19, 1794. 

74 v Samuel, b. Mar. 20, 1791. 

vi Fanny, b. Jan. 28, 1794 ; m. Sam'l Cheever, as his second wife, 
Sept. 3, 1815; d. Mar. 6, 1819. 

75 vii Daniel, ) twins . < b. May 27, 1796. 

viii Nancy, 5 ' c b. May 27, 1796; m. Abial Burgess, jr., 

July 15, 1818; d. May 20, 1857. Wid. 

The three sons of Capt. John were noted shipmasters, 

having followed the sea for the most of their lives and 

were always very successful. 

51 Hooper 8 ( William, 5 Samuel? Samuel, 3 Samuel, 2 
William 1 ) born Jan. 4, 1763 ; married Sarah Kitfield 
Dec. 18, 1788. She was born Aug. 30, 1767 ; died Aug. 
15, 1854, aged 87. He died Nov. 11, 1815. 

Children : 

i Hooper, b. Dec. 25, 1791; d. Sept. 30, 1811. 

ii Sarah, b. April 17, 1794; d. June 11, 1812. 

iii Harriet, b. Aug. 29, 1800; m. Sam'l L. Tuck, Mar. 29, 1825. 

iv Elizabeth, b. Jan. 2, 1805; d. Feb. 28, 1826. 

52 Jeremiah 6 (Jeremiah, 5 Jeremiah? Samuel? Sam- 
uel? William 1 ) born April 6, 1749 ; married Abigail 
Allen of Gloucester about 1769. 

Children : 

i Moses, b. May 25, 1770. 
ii Elisha, b. Oct. 14, 1771. 
iii Aaron, b. May 30, 1773. 

53 Stephen 6 (Stephen? Stephen? Benjamin? Sam- 
uel? William 1 ) born May 13, 1797 ; married Nanc 



GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 307 

Cross, April 5, 1827. She was born June 24, 1805 ; died 
Mar. 10, 1864. He died Mar. 29, 1880, aged 83. 
Children, (all born in Manchester) : 

i Caroline, b. May 28, 1827; m. Rufus C. Gault, Jan. 6, 1848. 

76 ii Stephen B., b. July 7, 1828. 

77 iii John R., b. Aug. 31, 1829. 

iv Nancy M., b. June 21, 1831; m. Wm. Somes of Gloucester, 
Feb. 28, 1854. 

78 v George, b. June 20, 1833. 

79 vi Elbridge, b. April 5, 1835. 

vii Emoline, b. June 28, 1838 ; d. Feb. 12, 1865. 

viii Louisa F., b. Oct. 18, 1840; m. John B. Knowlton, Oct. — , 

1869. 
ix Lucy D., b. Oct. 4, 1842; m. Jason Edgerly. 
x Infant, b. Dec. 1, 1844; d. soon. 

80 xi Rodney C, b. Feb. 17, 1847. 

54 Jonathan 6 (Jonathan? Jonathan? Jonathan? 
Samuel? William 1 ) born Oct. 23, 1766; married Anna 
Edwards, Dec. 26, 1786. She was born Mar. 10, 1766; 
died Oct. 11, 1840, aged 73. He died Dec. 5, 1849, 
aged 84. 

Children : 

i Daniel, b. Apr. 16, 1787; m. Lydia — — , of Hopkinton, 
N. H. 

81 ii Joseph, b. Dec. 16, 1789. 

• iii Anna, b. in Hopkinton, N. H., July 30, 1790; m. Asa Proctor 

of Londonderry, N. H., Feb. 14, 1819. 
iv Saloma, b. Aug. 27, 1792; m. Benj. Kitfleld, Apr. 3, 1851. 
v Nabby, b. Aug. 18, 1796; m. Winslow Dustan, Apr. 3, 1817. 
vi Elizabeth E., b. Mar. 1, 1798; ra. Varnura Dunton, Sept. 20, 

1817. 
vii Holton, b. Jan. 1, 1799 ; d. Mar. 30, 1871 ; unm. 
viii Jonathan M., b. Feb. 5, 1809 ; d. Jan. 31, 1851 ; unm. 

Jonathan after his marriage removed to Hopkinton, 
N. H., where he resided for a number of years, and where 
several of his children were born, and then returned to 
Manchester where the remainder of his family were born, 
and where he ended his long life. 



308 GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 

55 Daniel 6 (Jonathan? Jonathan? Jonathan? Sam- 
uel? William 1 ) born July 16, 1768; married Nancy Weir 
of Beverly about 1790. 

Children : 

i Nancy W\, b. Nov. 7, 1791; m. John B. Lord of Ipswich, 
Oct. 7, 1817; d, in Somervillle, April 27, 1874, se. 82. 

ii Arthur, b. in Hopkinton, N. H., July 29, 1793. Lost at sea. 

iii John or Jonathan, b. in Hopkinton, N. H., Feb. 3, 1796; lost 
at sea, Feb. 6, 1813. 

iv Luther, b. Apr. 4, 1798. Lost at sea. 

v Daniel, b. June 10, 1800; lost at sea, 1824. 

vi Calvin, b. — 1802; d. Oct. 13, 1832. 

vii Miranda, b. , 1812; d. Aug. 13, 1847. 

viii John Arthur, b. Oct. 5, 1817; m. Mary A. Crafts, Feb. 29, 
1844. She d. Nov. 29, 1845. He d. June 29, 1884. 

Daniel's first wife deceased, he married, second, Eliza- 
beth Lurvey, of Gloucester. 
Child : 
ix Elizabeth, b. . 

Daniel was quite a noted singer ; he left Manchester for 
Hopkinton, N. H. ; and after residing there a while, re- 
turned to Manchester, and spent the remainder of his days. 

56 Abner 6 (Azariah? Azariah? Jonathan? Samuel? 
William 1 ) born Oct. 9, 1767 ; married Lydia Lee, Mar. 
30, 1790. She was born Aug. 9, 1764; died Aug. 19, 
1852, aged 87. He died Mar. 6, 1830. 

Children : 

83 i Abner, b. Aug. 24, 1792. 

84 ii Azariah, b. Aug. 25, 1796. 

iii Isaac, b. Oct. 15, 1798; ra. Mary Burnham, Feb. 28, 1833; he 

d. Dec. 8, 1833. 
iv Charles, b. May 26, 1801 ; d. Jan. 25, 1879, se. 77; unm. 

57 Richard. 6 (Azariah? Azariah? Jonathan? Sam- 
uel? William 1 ) born Apr. 8, 1774; married Polly Prince 
of Salem, Dec. 6, 1796. She was born Sept. 4, 1779; 



GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 309 

died May 24, 1820. He died Mar. 15, 1837. He was a 

very enterprising shipmaster. 

Children : 

Richard, b. Sept. 27, 1797 ; d. Aug. 5, 1832 ; unm. 
ii Jonathan P., b. Sept. 13, 1799. 
iii Polly, b. Sept. 11, 1801; m. Charles Johnson, June 25, 1823; 

she d. Mar. 15, 1872, ae. 71. 
iv Irene, b. Aug. 10, 1803; m. Tyler Parsons, jr., Apr. 14, 1824. 
v John Prince, b. Oct. 2, 1805 ; d. Nov. 16, 1868, unm. 

85 vi Henry P., b. Nov. 14, 1807. 

86 vii Samuel P., b. Oct. 19, 1811. 

viii Augustus P., b. June 10, 1813; d. Aug. 23, 1815. 

ix Caroline, b. , 1815; m. George Proctor, Dec. 15, 1835. 

x Augustus P., b. Mar. — , 1820; d. , 1821. 

He married, second, Bethia Driver, Sept. 18, 1823. 
She died July 14, 1833. 
Child : 
xi Solomon D., b. Apr. 1, 1826. 

He married, third, Rebecca Girdler, Dec. 22, 1833, 
who died Apr. 18, 1845. 

58 John 6 (Azariah? Azariah? Jonathan? Samuel? 
Williayn 1 ) born Jan. 1, 1776 ; married Ruth Leach, Dec. 
26, 1797. She was born Apr. 17, 1778 ; died Oct. 13, 
1843. He died Aug. 27, 1834. He was a noted ship- 
master. 

Children : 

i Ruth, b. Sept. 4, 1798; m. John P. Allen, Nov. 28, 1816; 

d. June 13, 1875. 
ii John, b. May 23, 1801 ; killed on the beach, June 6, 1814. 

87 iii Benjamin L., b. Mar. 8, 1803; d. Sept. 24, 1865. 

88 iv Isaac, b. Nov. 11, 1805; d. Apr. 27, 1879. 

59 Aaron 6 {Malachi? Malachi? Jonathan? Samuel? 
William 1 ), born Aug. 28, 1765; married Lucy Story, 
Dec. 3, 1789. She was born Sept. 5, 1771; died Mar. 
24, 1794. He married, second, Sally Crafts, Oct., 1795. 



310 GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 

She was born Sept. 8, 1773; died June 15, 1857, aged 
84. He died Mar. 31, 1839, aged 74. 
Children : 

i Lucy S., b. Jan. 1, 1797; m. Nathan Allen, Feb. 8, 1817; 

m. 2d, Benj. Leach, Jan. 7, 1830. 
ii Aaron, b. Sept. 4, 1799; cl. at Buenos Ayres, S. A., Sept. 26, 

1824. 
iii Sally, Nov. 4, 1801; m. Samuel Edwards, Jan. 8, 1823; she 

d. Jan. 27, 1863. 

89 iv William H., b. Sept. 21, 1803. 

v Child, d. Feb. 11, 1808. 

vi Elizabeth, b. Dec. 28, 1808; m. William Young of Lanesville, 

Gloucester, Apr. 20, 1842; d. Apr. 26, 1883, in Manchester, 
vii Kuth Ann, b. Apr. 18, 1813; m. John Lothrop of Augusta, 

Me., Aug. 20, 1839; m. second, Capt. David Carter, Nov. 

8, 1844. 

60 William 6 (Malachi, 5 Malachi* Jonathan? Sam- 
uel? William 1 ) born Dec. 3, 1766; married Hannah Ed- 
wards, Nov. 9, 1789. She was born Oct. 5, 1770. Mar- 
ried, second, Feb. 12, 1804, Mary Hunt. 

Children by Hannah Edwards : 

90 i Hannah, b. Sept. 19, 1791; m. Henry Allen of Salem, 
ii Priscilla, b. Dec. 6, 1795; d. Feb. — , 1806. 

iii Evelina, b. Dec. 1, 1797; m. Capt. Thomas M. Saunders of Sa- 
lem, May — , 1823; she d. Oct. 19, 1879. 

Children by Mary Hunt : 

91 iv William E., b. July 10, 1806 in Salem. 

v Joseph A., b. Feb. 10, 1808; d. Nov., 1810; unm. 

92 vi Charles H., b. July 31, 1810. 

93 vii George F., b. Jan. 2, 1813. 

viii Frederick F., b. May 6, 1816; d. Sept. 22, 1818. 

61 Simeon 6 (Malachi, 5 Malachi*, Jonathan 3 , Sam- 
uel 2 , William 1 ), born Dec. 27, 1778; married Elizabeth 
Brown, Oct. 13, 1803. 

Child : 
i Laura Matilda, bapt. July 19, 1807. 



GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 311 

He died Sept. 16, 1816 ; she married, second, Josiah 
Ober of Beverly. 

62 Jacob 6 (Isaac, 5 Jacob,* Jonathan, 3 Samuel, 2 Wil- 
liam 1 ) born Aug. 26, 1789 ; married Lucy G. Galloup of 
Wenham, Jan. 29, 1809. She was born April 28, 1790 ; 
died April 9, 1871, aged 81. He died Aug. 2, 1852. 

Children : 

94 i Jacob A., b. in Beverly, Mar. 5, 1810. 

ii Lucy Rebecca, b. in Wenham, Jan. 6, 1814; m. Benjamin 
Severance, Feb. 15, 1842. She d. May 15, 1880. 

95 ill Enos G., b. in Wenham, Nov. 16, 1815. 

iv Aaron H., b. in Lynn, Dec. 23, 1817; in. July 20, 1848. 

v Isaac S., b. in Cavendish, Vt., Jan. 29, 1819 ; m. Jan. 14, 1847. 

vi Salome M., b. in Cavendish, Vt., Mar. 17, 1821; m. A. Fer- 
ris, Dec. 31, 1840; d. June 22, 1847. 

vii JohnL., ) ^ b. in Ticonderoga, N. Y., Mar. 24, 

? twins ; 5 1823 ; m. Oct. 13, 1842 ; d. Aug. 11, 1852 . 

viii Samuel H., ) ( b# in Ticonderoga, N. Y., Mar. 24, 

1823; d. July 6, 1829. 

ix Charles W., b. in Ticonderoga, N. Y., June 19, 1824; d. July 
11, 1825. 

x Susan T., b. in Ticonderoga, N. Y., Oct. 16, 1825; d. Oct. 9, 
1828. 

xi Elizabeth D., b. in Ticonderoga, N. Y., Nov. 11, 1826; m. 
June 26, 1845; d. Nov. 29, 1877. 

xii Hannah R., b. in Ticonderoga, N. Y., Feb. 27, 1828; m. Aug. 

29, 1850. 

xiii Susan T., b. in Ticonderoga, N. Y., May 20, 1829; m. Oct. 

31, 1848. 
xiv Pyra W., b. in Elizabethtown, N. Y., Aug. 15, 1831; d. Aug. 

30, 1831. 

63 Nathan, jr. 6 (Nathan 5 Jacob* Jonathan, 3 Sam- 
uel, 2 William 1 ) born Jan. 13, 1794; married Lucy S. 
Allen, Feb. 8, 1817. She was born Jan. 1, 1797. 

Children : 

i Nathan S., b. Nov. 18, 1818; d. April 21, 1824. 

ii Nancy C, b. Aug. 3, 1820 ; d. April 26, 1824. 

iii Lucy M., b. Oct. 18, 1822; d. April 27, 1824. 

iv Nathan, b. June 28, 1824; cl. June 12, 1811. 

96 v George F., b. Sept. 10, 1826. 



312 GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY. 

Nathan, jr., died Nov. 10, 1826, and she married, 
second, Capt. Benjamin Leach, Jan. 7, 1830, and she is 
still living at the ripe age of 91 years (1888). 

64 John P.6 (Nathan? Jacob? Jonathan? Samuel? 
William 1 ) born April 12, 1795; married Ruth Allen, 
Nov. 28, 1816. She was born Sept. 4, 1798 ; died June 
13, 1875. He died Jan. 30, 1875, se. about 80. 

Children : 

i Eliza P., b. Sept. 25, 1820; m. Charles Lee, Nov. 25, 1846. 
She d. Mar. 5, 1883. 

97 ii John P., jr., b. Feb. 11, 1823. 

98 iii Edward F., b. Jan. 30, 1827. 

iv Ruth L., b. May 15, 1831 ; d. June 1, 1839. 

v Ruthelia, b. Oct. 18, 1810; m. David Preston of Gloucester. 

John P. was one of the selectmen in 1828 and 1829, 

and always took a very active interest in all parish and 

town affairs. 

65 Enoch 6 (Nathan? Jacob? Jonathan? Samuel? 
William 1 ) born May 24, 1797 ; married Susan Marsters 

June 10, 1824. She was born Mar. 11, 1805 ; died Nov. 

4, 1826. He died July 8, 1842. 

Child : 

i Susan M., b. in Salem, Mar. 22, 1825 ; m. Moses P. Green- 
leaf, Oct. 27, 1846. 

He married, second, Eliza Peabody of Bradford, who 

died July 16, 1833. 

Children : 

ii Infant, b. , 1830; d. same year. 

iii Charlotte E., b. April 13, 1831 ; d. Nov. 13, 1861 ; unm. 

He married, third, Abigail W. Kogers of Maine, June 
17, 1834. He was chosen deacon of the Congregational 
Church, April 15, 1829, and served till his death. 

[To be continued.] 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



PUTNAM FAMILY. 

A genealogical record of the descendants of John Put- 
nam of Danvers (1640) is being prepared by Mr. Eben 
Putnam of Cambridge with the cooperation of the Rev. 
A. P. Putnam of Concord. 

Any information relating to the various branches of this 
family will be gratefully acknowledged by Eben Putnam. 

Box 2713, Boston. 

In Vol. xvni of these Collections, page 309, allusion 
is made in an extract from the diary of John Adams, 
there quoted, to the pleasure-house of Judge Lynde 
standing, in 1766, on Castle Hill, and of which no trace 
has survived. Chief Justice Benjamin Lynde, Junior, in- 
herited the Castle Hill farm, through his mother, from 
Major William Browne, his grandfather, who died 1716. 
Both he aud his father, who was also chief justice of the 
province, made additions to the estate by purchase from 
Colonel Turner and others. The second chief justice built 
what he called an "Arbor" there Aug. 6, 1724, and seems 
to have planned a "Villa" there in 1732. "My Castle Hill 
New House" was raised Oct. 4, 1748, and is described as 
" Judge Lynde's Pleasure-house" by John Adams in his 
diary, Aug. 14, 1766. Judge Lynde devised it, by will 
dated May 10, 1776, and in 1799 Dr. Bentley describes 
the farm as still in the possession of the Lynde family, 
adding, "but the spacious building on the hill is suffered 
to decay." 

Dr. Bentley alludes again to this locality on June 1, 
1809. "Walked in at Woods' Gate to Holmes' Neck and 

HIST. COLL. XXIV 20* (313) 



314 NOTES AND QUERIES. 

found the neck enclosed and the fields planted for the first 
time in the memory of this generation. Passed to Castle 
Hill upon which Mr. E. H. Derby has erected a small sum- 
mer house of two small and square stories, the upper of 
smaller dimensions, in the Italian style. It wants the 
grandeur of the former house which occupied this space. 
The old farm house at the foot of Castle Hill is in a state 
of decay." Felt says it blew down in a gale, Sept. 23, 1815. 



A question is also raised in Vol. xvni about the 
origin and significance of the name "Naugus Head," and 
a conjecture stated that it may have been a corrupt form 
of "Knockers' Head," or perhaps, like Saugus, an Indian 
word, since we find the syllable Nau in Naushaun and pos- 
sibly in our own Naumkeag, and also find the two towns 
of Naugatuck and Saugatuck near each other on the Con- 
necticut shore of Long Island Sound. 

We have now to add another to the list of conjectures. 
In a " Plan of Salem in Massachusetts, Lat. 42° 35' N. : 
Keduced by a pentagraph from a plan drawn in 1758, by 
James Ford, in possession of the late Dr. Winthrop's 
Executrix; Cambridge, 26 Oct., 1787," the locality in 
question is designated as "Nogg's Head." If this settles 
one question it opens another. If this breezy elevation 
was Nogg's head, who was Nogg orNoggs? The plan 
contains other features of great interest, and is among the 
Collections of the Essex Institute. 



In the present volume, page 246, reasons are given 
for the conjecture that Emanuel Downing may have been 
living at as late a date as 1658. In point of fact he was 
living at Edinborough, Feb. 2, 1657, and as late as Dec. 
9, 1658, and writing letters which will be found in Mass. 
Hist. Collections, Fourth Series, Vol. vi, pp. 84-7. 



INDEX OF NAMES 



Abbot, 183, 185, 187, 188, 
199, 201, 202, 203, 204. 

Abbott, 126. 

Abercrombie, 144. 

Aborn, 146, 147. 

Acy, 56, 57. 

Adams, 3. 123, 129, 131, 147, 
268, 278, 294, 313. 

Agge, 1(50. 

Albamarlea, 27. 

Albemarle, 10, 21, 22, 35. 

Alfred, 16. 

Allen, 160, 223, 224, 225, 226, 
227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 
233, 234, 235,-236, 237, 238, 
239, 240, 302, 304, 306, 309, 
310, 311. 

Allerton, 167. 

A I my, 275. 

Andreas, 67. 

Andreas, 159. 

Andrew, 41, 160, 184, 187, 

193, 242. 

Andrews, 64, 183, 184, 185, 
186, 187, IS9, 190, 193, 194. 
Apes, 181. 

Appleton, 67, 104, 305. 
Atherton, 96. 
Atwood, 44, 128. 
Austin, 98, 303. 
Averel, 195. 
Averell, 189, 190, 191, 192, 

194, 195, 196, 198, 203. 
Averil, 193, 194, 196, 199, 

202. 
Averill, 187, 188, 193, 194, 

195, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 
205. 

Avery, 94, 98, 191. 
Ayres, 302. 



Babington, 10. 

Babson, 3. 

Bailey, 44, 46, 52, 53, 56, 58. 

59, 61, 124, 177. 
Baker, 73, 158, 181, 183, 185, 

187, 199, 201, 202, 203, 204, 

240, 294. 
Balch, 198, 200, 202, 224. 
Baldwin, 26. 
Bancroft, 143, 147, 148, 149, 

150. 
Barker, 44,59,60. 
Barnard, 104, 275. 
Barnes, 19, 78. 
Bartlet, 40. 
Eartleft. 123, 124, 125, 126, 

127, 128, 129, 130, 132, 133, 

134, 136, 138 139,206,209, 

214,215. 

Bartole, 248. 
Barton, 252. 



Bassett, 177. 
Batchelder, 4, 39, 303, 
Batcbiler, 254. 
Beadle, 249. 
Beale, 65. 
Bear, 237. 
Beecher, 293. 
Benedict, 3. 
Benezet, 104. 
Bennett, 48, 229, 231, 

291. 
Bennit, 202. 
Bentley, 160, 275, 313. 
Berry, 277, 278, 280, 

283, 28t, 287, 288, 289. 

291, 293, 295, 296. 
Birmingham, 278. 
Bishop, 190, 301. 
Bixby, 181, 183, 184, 

186, 187, 188, 190, 191, 
193, 194, 195, 197, 203. 

Blanchard, 4, 76. 
Blighe, 177. 
Blodgette, 43. 
Bond. 3. 
Bondfield. 65. 
Bonvill, 27,28. 
Bonville, 18, 28. 
Booth, 11. . 
Borman, 183, 187, 192, 

199. 
Bosworth, 5. 
Bowdish, 252, 25S, 261. 
Bowditch, 97, 160, 249, 

256, 258. 
Bowdoin, 107. 
Bo wen, 97. 
Bowker, 241. 
Bovd, 203. 
Boyden, 288, 289,290, 

292, 293, 294, 296. 
Boynton, 44,50,59, 61. 
Bracken b ury , 223. 
Bradley, 224, 283. 
Bradstreet, 48, 49, 64, 

66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 184, 

187, 188, 197, 198, 200, 
202,203, 204,205,242, 
249, 250, 251, 253, 255, 
271. 

Brads troete, 249. 
Breed, 177. . 
Brewer, 18, 177. 
Bridgmnn, 224. 
Broadstreet, 6*-. 
Brocklebank, 48. 
Brooks, 3. 
Brown, 3, 72.119,149, 

160, 23i, 306, 310. 
Browne, 241,249, 252, 

256, 313. 
Buckmun, 186. 
Buffum, 180. 



304. 






282, 
290, 



185, 
192, 



196. 



252 



21)1 



159, 

25:), 



Burgess, 306. 

Burke, 160. 

Burlescombe, 36. 

Burnham, 159, 308. 

Burpee, 63. 

Burr, 261. 

Burrill, 177. 

Burton, 191, 194, 195, 197, 

201, 204. 
Busell, 181. 
Busk, 160. 
Bussel, 191. 
Butler, 198, 200, 294. 
Buttolph, 252, 25 , 272. 
Buzzell, 197. 
Byrne, 160. 



Caesar, 15. 

Caldwell, 294. 

Calf, 229. 

Camden, 6, 10, 11, 15. 

Candige, 63. 

Capen, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 

186, 189, 196, 199,201,205. 
Capman, 157. 
Carbonell, 27. 
Carew, 32. 
Carlton, 51, 64. 
Carnes, 257. 
Carpenter, 158. 
Carrel, 49. 
Carrell, 66, 69. 
Carter, 232, 304, 310. 
Cates, 160. 
Caves, 194. 
Center, 48. 
Chadbourn, 98. 
Chaplin, 63, 69. 
Chapman, 191, 192, 194, 202, 

203. 
Charles I, 11, 31. 
Charles II, 19,31. 
Chase, 297. 
Cheever, 230, 234, 257, 304, 

306. 
Cheney, 45. 
Chester, 30. 
Chipman, 97. 
Choate, 97. 122. 
Church, 221, 254. 
Chute, 146. 

Clark, 59, 188, 190, 195. 
Clarke, 185, 186, 1S7, 192, 

193, 198, 200. 
Cleaveland, 140, 141, 142, 

143, 144, 145. 
Cleaves, 119. 
Cleves, 116. 
Coburn, 70. 71. 
Cochrane, 3. 
Codman, 119, 120, 121. 
Coffin, 49, 52, 67. 



(315) 



316 



INDEX OF NAMES, 



Cogswell, 3, 159, 163, 164, 

180. 
Coldam, 177. 
Cole, 45. 
Coleman, 158. 
Collins, 257. 
Collon,302. 
Collyer, 299. 
Conant, 3, 26, 39, 78, 159, 

202, 224. 
Constantine, 15. 
Coombs, 100. 
Cooper, 277. 
Copley, 33. 
Corey, 255. 

Cox, 153, 273, 296, 297, 299. 
Crafts, 234, 302, 308, 309. 
Crandall, 288. 
Cressee, 232, 233. 
Cressey, 44. 
Cromwell, 172. 
Crosby, GO, 67. 
Cross, 64,228, 307. 
Crow, 227. 

Crowell, 140, 237, 240, 297. 
Cumins, 183. 
Cummings, 160, 202. 
Cummins, 183, 184, 185, 186, 

188, 189, 190, 193, 194, 198, 
200, 201, 202, 203, 205. 

Curtic, 188. 

Curtis, 184, 186, 187, 188, 

189, 190, 191, 192, 193. 194, 
195, 196, 197, 198, 201, 203, 
204. 

Curtiss, 184. 
Cushing, 97, 98. 
Cutler, 269, 270. 
Cutts, 123, 206, 215, 220. 



Dalton, 128. 

Damarell, 1, 10, 27, 28, 35, 

Dammerle, 28. 

Dammorys, 9. 

Dan forth, 60, 149, 150. 

Daumarl, 10. 

Daumarle, 22. 

Daumerle, 10, 27, 35. 

Daunay, 33. 

Dauney, 33. 

Davenport, 251. 

Davis, 61, 80, 159, 160. 

Dawson, 160. 

Day, 158, 302. 

Deland, 273. 

Delves, 11. 

Dennis, 127. 

Derby, 314. 

Dewing, 257. 

Dickinson, 62. 

Dinant, 30. 

Dinham, 28, 29, 30. 

Dinsmoore, 216, 217, 218. 

Doak, 278. 

Dodge, 39, 75, 76, 109, 110 

111,112,113,114, 115, 116. 

117, 118,119, 120, 121, 122. 

150. 157, 158, 159, 205, 234i 

210, 303. 304. 
Dole, 49, 50. 
Donaldson, 160. 
Donnell, 49. 
Dorchester, 297, 299. 



Dorman, 183, 184, 185, 186, 
187, 188, 190, 192, 194, 195, 
196, 197, 198, 201, 204, 205. 

Dow, 158. 

Downing, 11, 242, 243, 244, 
245, 246, 247, 249, 251, 253, 
255, 272, 274, 282, 314. 

Downinge, 244. 

Downynge, 246. 

Drake, 29, 32, 33. 

Dresser, 47, 57, 64. 

Driver, 230, 235, 305, 309. 

Dudley, 251. 

Dugdale, 6. 26. 

Dummer, 66, 67. 

Duncan, 128, 215. 

Dun lap, 160. 

Dunnel, 184, 189, 189, 190, 
191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 
197,199,201,203. 

Dunnell, 202. 

Dunnels, 183. 

Dunton, 307. 

Dustan, 307. 

Duty, 44. 

Dwight, 3. 

Dwinel, 159. 

Dynam, 29. 

Dynham, 29. 



Eames, 187. 

Eastman, 260, 300. 

Easty, 182. 

Eaton, 150. 

Edgerly, 307. 

Edward, 33. 

Edward I, 2, 10, 11, 21, 22, 

38 
Edward II, 10,28, 37. 
Edward III, 21,;27, 28, 30. 
Edward IV, 28,30.31. 
Edwards, 114, 116, 117, 118, 

119, 121, 122, 160, 231. 236, 

302, 304, 305, 306, 307, 310. 
Eliutt, 32. 
Elithorp, 61, 62. 
Elizabeth, 8, 9, 11, 32, 36. 
Ellis, 23. 
Ellsworth, 44. 
Emerson, 154. 
Endecot,244. 
Endecott, 3. 8, 223, 224, 247. 
Endicot, 185, 186. 
Endicott, 2. 
English, 250. 
Epes, 117. 
Este, 181. 
Estey, 182. 
Estie, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 

188, 189, 194, 199. 
Esty, 190, 191, 192, 194, 195, 

196, 197, 198, 202, 204, 205. 
Estvs, 201. 
Everett, 3. 
Eyton, 23. 



Fairfax. 30. 
Fairfield, 160. 
Fal staff, 250. 
F;irley, 157. 
Farnham, 160. 
Farrar, 177, 263. 



Farrington, 177. 

Felt,62, 243, 247, 248, 249, 286. 

Fen by, 278. 

Ferris, 311. 

Field, 160. 

Fillmore, 277, 278, 279, 280, 

281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 

298. 
Finney, 44. 

Fisher, 98, 268, 269, 276. 
Fiske, 3, 253, 282. 
Fitch, 269, 270. 
Fitzpatrick, 97. 
Flanders, 160. 
Flint, 205. 
Ford, 31, 160, 314. 
Foster, 53, 57, 157, 159, 160, 

184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 

190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 

196, 197, 198, 199, 201, 203, 

204, 231, 303. . 
Fowle. 244, 245. 
Fowler, 53. 
Freeman, 13, 26, 159. 
French, 183, 188, 190, 193, 

194, 196. 
Friend, 73, 74, 75, 122. 
Frinks, 160. 
Frothingham, 3. 
Frye, 160. 
Fuller, 177. 
Fulton, 268, 269. 



Gage, 51, 53, 54, 58, 63, 105, 
257. 

Gallop, 158. 

Galloup, 303, 310. 

Gallup, 157. 

Gardner, 76, 160, 238, 241, 
243,244,246,249, 251, 252, 
253, 254, 258, 272, 273, 274. 

Garland, 160. 

Gault, 307. 

Gedney, 249, 272, 273, 274. 

Gentle, 119. 

Gentlee, 224. 

George II, 32, 117. 

George III, 23. 

Gerrish, 80, 157. 

Gibson, 292. 

Gill, 98, 185, 299. 

Gilman, 160. 

Girdler, 236, 309. 

Glendower, 11. 

Godfrey, 304. 

Goff. 246. 

Goldsmith, 114. 

Gonzales, 88. 

Goodhall,201. 

Goodhue, 48, 57, 264. 

Goodridge, 77. 

Goold, 181. 

Goolsmith, 114. 

Gorges, 36. 

Gough, 11. 

Gould, 157, 159,181,1*2,183, 
181, 185,187,189,190.191, 
193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 
19!), 200, 201,202, 203, 204, 
205. 

Gowing, 150. 

Gracey, 300. 

Grant, 47, 48,59,158,273. 



INDEX OF NAMES. 



317 



Graves, 292. 

Gray, 2. 241. 266, 267. 

Green, lttO, 248, 250. 

Greene, 260. 

Green leaf, 69, 98, 160,312, 

Grey, 28. 

Guptil, 160. 



Haberfield, 177. 

Hackley, 133, 134. 

Hail, 187. 

Haile, 186. 

Hale, 59, 71, 189, 190. 

Hall, 101, 107, 108, 152, 238, 

304. 
Hambleton. 300. 
Hamilton, 129, 281. 
Hammond, 63, 70. 
Hancock, 94. 123, 131. 
Hanscom, 160. 
Hardy, 43, 47, 59. 
Harper, 4. 
Harradean, 157. 
Harraden, 159. 
Harriman, 63. 
Harris, 64, 65. 
Harrod, 134. 
Hart. 163. 
Haseltine, 61. 
Hatkell, 55, 233. 
Hassam, 226. 231, 237. 
Hatliorn, 243. 
Hathorne, 3, 160. 
Haven, 177. ' 
Havvkes, 152, 161,162, 163, 

164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 

170, 171, 172, 178, 174, 175, 

176, 177, 178, 179, 180. 
Hawks, 151, 152, 162, 163, 

164, 179. 
Hawthorne, 286. 
Hazen, 58, 59, 60, 61,121, 

185. 186, 187, 189, 190. 
Heathfield, 32, 33. 
Heintzelmann, 219. 
Henchman, 178. 
Henfield, 272. 
Henry 1, 21. 
Henry II. 27, 28. 
Henry III, 9,21,22,27, 33, 

36. 
Henry IV, 12, 33. 
Henry VI. 31. 
Henry VII, 29, 34. 
Henry VIII, 8, 15. 
Herrick, 39, 73, 234, 236, 

294. 
Herron, 160. 
Hibbard, 234. 
Hibbert, 51. 
Hickes, 13. 
Hidden, 43, 44. 
Higgins, 119. 
Hill, 228, 233. 
Hilton, 227, 230, 231. 
Hitch ings, 180. 
Hobard, 181. 
Hobbard. 182. 
Hobbes, 185, 190. 
Hobbs, 78, 191, 195, 197. 

199, 201. 
Hodges, 4, 160. 
H,rlgkins, 157,158. 



Hodgman, 146. 

Holland, 158. 

Holten, 98. 

Holyoke, 127, 260. 

Homer, 85. 

Hood, 158, 177. 

Hooker, 119. 

Hooper, 228, 229, 234, 235, 

237, 257. 
Hopkins, 98, 276, 277. 
Hopkinson, 48, 50, 55. 
Horn, 246. 
Hovey. 160. 183, 186, 188, 

190, 192, 195, 196, 197, 198, 

199, 201, 202. 
How, 63, 181, 182, 183, 184. 

185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 

192, 194, 195, 197, 198, 199 

200,201, 202,203,204, 205. 
Howard, 123, 160, 206. 
Howlet, 184, 186. 
Howlett, 183, 189, 191, 193 

199, 205. 
Hubbard, 181, 254. 
Huchisson, 163. 
Hudson, 177. 
Humffreys, 38. 
Humphrey, 247, 254. 
Humphreys, 212. 
Hunkins,'l97. 
Hunt, 3, 47, 48, 60, 61, 219 

222, 310. 
Hutchinson, 104, 160, 164. 
Hyler, 283. 



Ties, 202, 204. 
Ingersoll, 257. 
Isherwood, 264. 
Isles, 203. 



Jackson, 4, 41, 56, 57, 184, 
188,286. 

Jacob, 11. 

James, 36. 

Jaques, 160. 

Jarvis, 60, 123,124,125,126, 
127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 
133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 
139, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 
211,212,213,214,215, 216, 
217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222. 

Jaynes, 160. 

Jefferson, 129, 136, 261, 264, 
265. 

Jeffors, 199. 

Jeffrey, 258, 261. 

Jetton, 201. 

Jewett, 44, 49. 50, 51, 53,54, 
55,59,61, 69,71. 

John, 21, 22. 

Johnson, 43, 47, 49, 50, 57, 
58, 59, 69, 124, 160, 177, 309. 

Josselyn, 91, 92. 



Kehow, 160. 
Kelham,23, 26. 
Kemble, 13. 
Kenney, 190, 192. 
Kent, 97. 
Kibby, 281. 
Kilborn, 50, 55, 56. 



Kill«m,239. 
Killock, 227. 
Ki Hum, 200. 
Kimball, 58, 59, 65, 217, 220, 

222. 
Kitfield, 306, 307. 
Knap, 160. 

Kneeland, 141, 160, 280. 
Knight, 185, 186, 187, 188, 

197, 198, 199, 200, 203, 224, 

234. 
Knolton, 202. 
Knowlton, 118, 119, 158, 159, 

228, 236, 240, 307. 
Kymball, 203, 204. 
Kymballs, 191. 



Lake, 200, 202, 204. 

Lakeman, 158. 

Lambert, 43, 45, 78. 

Lancaster, 10. 

Lane, 159. 

Langdall, 116. 

Langdell. 118, 119, 120, 121, 

122. 
Langmaid, 79. 
Lappenberg, 13. 
Leach, 3, 227, 228, 233, 302, 

305, 309, 310, 311 . 
Lee, 19, 51, 119, 226, 227, 

229, 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 

235, 238, 239, 275, 276, 31)1, 

302, 305, 308, 312. 
Lemot, 160. 
Leslie, 10. 
L'Ktombe, 94. 
Lewis, 16, 169, 177, 272, 278. 
Lincoln, 270, 295. 
Linton, 157. 
Livingston, 269, 270. 
Longley.219,220. 
Lord, 164, 308. 
Loring, 4. 
Lothrop, 310. 
Lovejoy, 84. 
Love'll. 263. 
Low, 157, 159, 302, 303. 
Lowndes, 22. 
Lunt, 49, 50,68, 234. 
Lurvey, 308. 
Lurvy, 157. 
Luscomb. 160. 
Lynde, 313. 
Lvsons, 10,11,12,14,16,28, 

29,31,33,34. 



Macaulay, 174. 
Macclesfield, 11. 
Maeintire, 258. 
McLaughlin, 239. 
McReading, 281. 
Madison, 132, 133, 136. 
Maloon, 305. 
Mandeville, 27. 
Manning, 68. 160. 241, 295. 
Mansfield, 117,160,295, 300. 
Marshall, 18. 

Marsters, 232, 236, 304, 312. 
Marston, 246. 
Martin, 303. 
Masterson, 305. 
Masury,79. 



318 



INDEX OF NAMES. 



Maunsdevill, 27. 

Maverick, 91, 167, 175, 180. 

Mavericke, 162, 164. 

May, 158. 

Mayo, 281. 

Meredith, 300. 

Merrifield, 202. 

Merrill,3.78,240, 287, 288, 294 

Merritt, 277, 278. 

Micklefield, 277, 283. 

Mitfhill, 43. 

Mildram,80. 

Miller, 46. 

Millet, 157. 

Mills, 27. 

Mingo, 40. 

Minot, 4, 67. 

Monk, 34. 172. 

Moody, 55, 69. 

More, 157. 

Morgan, 118, 120, 121, 157, 

2.55, 239. 
Morris, 207. 
Motley, 152, 153. 
Moulton, 146, 157, 288. 
Mount, 160. 
Mozley, 34. 
Mudge, 282. 



Nalam, 58. 
Nealan, 200. 
Nealand, 199, 201, 203. 
Needham, 153. 
Nelson, 48, 52, 53, 56. 64. 
Newell, 128. 
Newhall, 153, 165, 176. 
Newman, 49,50,53. 
Nicholls, 61,63. 
Nichols, 183, 184, 186, 188 
197, 198, 199, 200, 202, 201 
Noble, 160. 
Nogg, 314. 
Noggs, 314. 
Norman, 223. 
Northend, 67, 68, 70. 
Norton, 243, 303. 



Ober, 77, 310. 
Odell, 300. 
Odlin, 249, 250. 

Ogden, 269. 
Oliver, Is, 97. 
Orne, 76, 153, 154, 246. 
Osbern, 12, 13. 
Osbert, 12. 
Osborne, 236. 
Osgood, 128. 
Osinent, 236. 
Ovid, 30. 



Pabody, 183. 
Paine, 142. 
Palfray, 168, 245. 
Palfrey, 224. 
Palmer. 51. 
Parish, 144. 
Parker, 67, 68, 129. 

Parsons, 49, 51, 155, 260, 309. 
Patch, 36. 
Payson, 50. 



Peabody, 158, 201, 204, 205, 
241, 247, 257, 258, 259, 272, 
273, 304, 312. 

Peach, 65. 

Pearson, 46, 51, 70, 71, 155. 

Pearsons, 160. 

Pebody, 181, 184, 185, 186, 
187, 188, 190, 191, 192, 193, 
194, 195, 198, 199, 200, 201, 
202, 203, 204. 

Peele, 160. 

Peirce, 66, 68. 

Pemberton, 67. 

Pepperell, 125, 131. 

Pepperrell, 221. 

Perkins, 52. 76, 77, 121,154. 
155, 157, 158, 160, 181, 183, 
184, 185, 18>, 187, 188, lh9. 
190. 191,192,193, 191, 195, 
196, 197, 198. 199, 200, 201, 
202,203.201.205, 288. 

Perley, 50, 56, 183, 189, 190. 
192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 198, 
199,201,202. 

Perly, 187. 

Perry, 231, 303. 

Persons, 157. 

Peter, 245. 

Peters, 30, 242, 253. 

Peterson, 294. 

Peverell, 9. 

Phillips, 98. 

Phips, 39. 

Phippen, 160. 

Pickard, 51,55,66, 67,70. 

Pickering. 3, 246, 266, 267, 
268, 269, 282. 

Pickman, 134, 247, 218, 252, 
258, 2/2. 

Pierce, 4, 79, 228, 229, 266. 

Pike, 68, 283. 

Pike worth, 254. 

Pingree, 242. 292. 

Pitman, 236. 

Pitt, 29. 

Plats, 58. 

Plaits, 65, 66, 70. 

Plainer, 70, 71. 

PIu miner, 60, 135. 

Poland, 158. 

Pole, 26.27, 28,29,31,33,3 1,35. 

Pollexfen, 32. 

Polwhele, 1, 10,17, 18, 19, 
27, 29, 34. 

Pool, 109, 159. 

Poole, 155. 

Popham. 35. 

Porter, 189, 190, 191, 192, 
19 J >, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 
201,202,201. 

Potter, 78, 177, 194, 196, 198, 
199,200,201,202, 203,201, 
205. 

Powell, 98. 

Powers, 4. 

Prescott,241, 258, 259. 

Preston, 79, 312. 

Price, 223, 302. 

Prideanx, 28, 29, 30, 31. 

Prime, 46, 66. 

Prinee, 29, 31, 160, 252, 253, 
286, 2t»7, 270, 275, 308, 309. 

Pritchet, 193 194. 

Pritchett, 191, 196. 



Proctor, 238, 254, 305, 307, 

309. 
Ptolemy, 15. 
Putnam, 39, 187, 188, 252, 

257, 259, 270, 278, 313. 

©nimby, 302. 
Quincy, 132. 

Ramsrlel, 200. 

Ramsdell, 201, 202, 203, 204. 

Rand, 177, 292. 

Rantoul, 1, 4, 81. 

Raveimas, 15. 

Ray, 121, 300. 

Rea, 39. 

Read, 242, 252, 253, 258, 259, 

262, 263, 264, 265, 266. 367, 

268, 269, 271. 
Reddington, 183, 184, 185, 

186, 187, 189, 190, 191, 192, 

204. 
Redington, 181, 182, 184, 

203, 204. 
Reith, 160. 
Remsen, 264. 
Reynolds, 33. 
Rhodes, 79, 177. 
Rice, 160, 254, 300. 
Richard I, 2, 27. 
Richard II, 29, 36. 
Richards, 215, 222, 294. 
Richardson, 304. 
Ringe, 237. 

Risdon, 1,16,17, 27,29. 
Roapes, 249, 250, 251. 
Robie,301. 
Robinson, 158, 188, 192, 194, 

196, 198, 199, 202. 
Robson, 299. 
Roby, 178. 
Role, 65. 
Rogers, 312. 
Robe, 65. 
Rolle, 15. 
Ropes, 97, 160, 248, 249, 250, 

256, 258. 
Row, 157, 159. 
Rumsey, 264, 270. 
Rush, 104. 
Russell, 15, 19. 
Rust, 237. 



Sage, 160. 

Saltonstall, 128. 

Samples, 234. 

Sanborn, 282. 

Sargent, 68, 283. 

Saunders, 51, 310. 

Savage, 3, 56. 

Sawyer, 44, 54. 

Sayward, 69. 

Scott, 54. 

Searl, 160. 

Searle, 54, 55. 

Sedgwick. 217. 

■Serjeant, 158. 

Sever, 98. 

Severance, 311. 

Sewall, 67, 70, 98, 100, 221, 

260, 261. 
Shakespeare, 6, 13, 174, 274. 
Shaplcy, 194. 



INDEX OF NAMES. 



319 



Shatswell, 70. 

Shattuck, 79. 

Shay, 107. 

Sheffield, 11. 

Sliepard, ICO. 

Shepherd, 44. 

Shepley. 193. 

Sher\vin,190. 

Shillaber, 160. 

Shortt, 14, 15. 

Shumwa, 195, 197. 

Shumway, 190, 191, 193, 195, 

196. l'JS. 
Shurwin, 192. 
Siblev, 11. 
Silsbee, 177. 
Simons, 183. 
Slew, 96, 97. 
Slocum, 160. 

Smith, 23, 53,55. 56,57,58, 
121, 155, 157, 160, 183, 184, 
185,187,188,189, 190, 191, 
192, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 
19!), 201, 203, 204, 239, 291, 
295. 

Smyth, 92. 

Somes, 307. 

Sparhuwk, 125, 131, 133, 155, 
156. 

Spaulding, 275. 281, 287, 288. 

Spofford, 61, 69. 

Sprague, 134, 160, 206, 214, 
219, 220. 

Squire, 196. 

Stafford, 18. 

Standley, 119. 

Stanley, 160. 184, 185, 186, 
187,189,192, 193, 194, 195, 

197, 198, 199, 201, 202, 203. 
Stark, 3. 

Starrett, 79, 80. 
Steel, 157. 
Steele, 299, 30$. 
Stephens, 157. 
Stevens, 204, 236, 270. 
Stewart, 278. 
Stickney, 43. 45, 60. 
Stiles, 183, 184,187, 189. 
Stockton, 268, 269. 
Stone, 3. 
Story, 4, 309, 
Strong, 57, 261. 
Stuart. 167. 172, 274. 
Sumner, 160. 
Swan, 56, 104. 
Sweasey, 52. 
Swett, 193. 
Sweyen, 165. 
Swinerton, 156. 
Symonds, 245. 



Talbot, 6. 
Tappan, 305. 
Tarbell, 180. 
Tair, 157, 159. 
Tarrimr, 235. 
Taylard, 10. 
Taylor, 5, 7,22,98. 
Tenney, 43. 44, 45, 46, 59. 
Tewksburv, 158, 238, 303. 
Thorley. 47. 
Thorndike, 39, 233. 
Thornton, 11. 



Thoroton, 2, 9. 

Thorpe, 5, 13. 

Thurlow, 47. 

Thurston, 282. 

Tibbets, 160. 

Ticknor, 259. 

Tillison,47. 

Todd, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 
54, 55, 60, 69. 

Toppen, 49, 52. 

Torrey, 208. _J 

Towgel, 235. 

Town, 183, 185. 

Towne, 182, 183, 184, 185, 
187,188, 190, 191,192,193, 
194,195,196,197, 198,199, 
200,201,202,203,204, 205. 

Townsend, 156, 180. 

Trask, 39, 160. 

Treadwell, 160. 

Trevethick, 266. 

Trowbridge, 97. 

Trumbl, 57. 

Trumble, 55, 56, 57. 

Trumbull, 57. 

Tuck, 226, 227, 228, 230, 303. 
306. 

Tucker, 157. 

Tufts, 68. 

Turner, 13, 313. 

Tuttle, 77. 



Upham, 187,253,254. 
Upton, 156, 160. 



Vincent, 160. 
Vincentini, c 
Voltaire, 21. 



Wainwright, 249. 
Wait, 282. 
Walker, 229. 
Wall is, 65, 185, 303. 
Ward, 100, 257,258. 
Warner, 50. 
Warren, 98. 
Warren ne, 10. 
Washington, 257, 265, 270. 
Waters, 65, 186, 190, 193, 194, 

195, 196, 197, 261. 
Watson, 183. 
Wauban, 32. 
Webb, 160. 
Webster, 32, 63. 
Weir, 308. 
Wellington, 133. 
Wellman, 160. 
Wells, 240. 
Wentworth,30. 
Wesley, 276. 
West, 46, 47. 
Westcote, 12. 
Wheaton, '270. 
Whedon, 299. 
Wheeler, 67, 69, 215. 
Whipple, 96, 97. 
Whiteomb, 98. 
White, 8, 53, 78,98,124, 128, 

242 
Whiting, 176. 
Whittiugham, 205. 



Whittredge, 78. 

Wicom, 56, 58. 59. 

Widebergh, 37. 

Wild, 60, 192,193. 

Wildes, 158. 

Wilds, 181, 183, 185, 186, 
188, 189, 191, 195, 196, 197, 
198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 
204. 

Wilkins, 119, 121, 122. 

Willard, 191, 200. 

Williams, 92, 160, 227, 242, 
257. 

Willis, 187. 

Willit, 189, 

Wilson, 160. 

Winn, 142. 

Win slow, 288. 

Winthrop, 11, 91, 161, 166, 
242.243,244,245,251, 253, 
274, 314. 

Winthrope, 245. 

Wise, 287. 

Witham, 157. 

Wittle, 160. 

Woddebur, 2. 

Wodebere, 35, 36. 

Wodeberie. 6, 23, 24. 

Wodebur, 2, 36. 

Wodeburg, 1, 2, 9, 11. 

Wodeburgh, 9. 

Wodeburghe, 37. 

Wodebury, 36, 37. 

Wodyaber'a, 36. 

Wolfe, 40. 

Wood. 47, 48, 60, 61,62, 67, 
68, 69, 184, 185, 186, 188, 
190, 193, 195, 196. 

Woodbayre, 36. 

Woodbear, 33. 

Woodbeare, 33, 35, 36. 

Woodberg, 27. 

Wood berry, 122. 

Woodbery, 1, 2. 

Woodbeiye, 35, 38. 

Woodbirre, 36. 

Woodbry, 39. 

Woodbury, 1, 2, 3, 4,5, 6, 7, 
8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 
16, 17,18, 19,20,21,22,23, 
24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31, 
32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 
40, 41, 42. 43, 46, 122, 224, 
238, 303. 

Woodman, 45, 46, 59, 104. 

Woods, 195. 

Worcester, 53. 

Wormahill, 64. 

Wormwell, 64. 

Wudber, 37. 

Wudeberg, 9. 

Wudebirig, 6. 

Wudeburc, 2, 9. 

Wudeburg, 6. 

Wudeburge, 6. 

Wydebyrre, 37. 



York, 157. 
Young, 310. 



ESSEX INSTITUTE 



HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS. 



JAN., FEB., and MAR., 1887 



VOLUME XXIV. 



SALEM, MASS. : 

PRINTED FOR THE ESSEX INSTITUTE. 

1887. 



ESSEX INSTITUTE 



HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS. 



APEIL, MAY, and JUNE, 1887, 



VOLUME XXIV. 



SALEM, MASS. : 

PRINTED FOR THE ESSEX INSTITUTE. 
1887. 



ESSEX INSTITUTE 



HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS 



JULY, AUGUST, and SEPTEMBER, 1887 



VOLUME XXIV 



SALEM, MASS. 

PRINTED FOR THE ESSEX INSTITUTE 

1888 



ESSEX INSTITUTE 



HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS 



OCT., NOV. and DECEMBER, 1887 



VOLUME XXIV 



SALEM, MASS. 

PRINTED FOR THE ESSEX INSTITUTE 

1888 



3737